Am I the only person who cleans his guns?


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BigShep85
January 9, 2012, 05:58 AM
Not too long ago I traded for a couple pistols one I intended on keeping and one to sale, and when I recieved them while in great shape they were filthy, I mean dirty to the point that I was amazed somebody would let anything they owned get that dirty:uhoh:, (This guy was the original purchaser of both pistols) so I took them home cleaned them really good and they looked like new the one I kept (4506) went by the bed and the other is gone now glad to send it off in cleaned and like new shape.
Now A couple weeks ago I bought a used rifle an AR 15 off a guy and he sent it to me, great looking gun no scratches scuffs on the mags or furniture etc, I took it out to the range and sighted it in and the bolt a time or two didnt go all the way forward. Forward assist fixed that no problem so I took it home to clean it and I was amazed AGAIN at how filthy this gun was I had never seen a gun that dirty before and I see ALOT of guns, even the before mentioned pistols wasnt this dirty I wouldn't be surprised if this gun had never been cleaned.:what:

Am I the only person who cleans their guns at all:scrutiny:? I enjoy cleaning my guns but don't clean them after every range trip or sometimes even after a few range trips (depending on round count) but I have never seen guns this dirty and this was two seperate people on two seperate occasions. Am I the only one this happens too?
I am just looking for fellow high roaders feedback on this, I feel like this kinda wears a gun out quicker and leads to malfunctions or parts to break but thats just my opinion I guess.

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Hunterdad
January 9, 2012, 06:00 AM
No, I clean mine.

BigShep85
January 9, 2012, 06:04 AM
[Merged -- Sam]

spikedzombies
January 9, 2012, 06:13 AM
I clean my ar15 when it stops functioning, my 38spcl when I get bored and almost never for my glock 19, 10/22 and Mosin nagant.

Sent vs Mytouch 4G

AEA
January 9, 2012, 06:21 AM
<Threads Merged>

Oh, I clean mine after every range trip.

wildehond
January 9, 2012, 06:59 AM
My carry gun get a onceover every week. Other guns get cleaned after a good range session.

Hacker15E
January 9, 2012, 07:02 AM
Seems to be a recent trend that I've read about quite a bit on firearms forums.

I was brought up to clean 'em as soon as you're done shooting them.

briansmithwins
January 9, 2012, 07:05 AM
I'm pretty OCD about cleaning firearms. I like to run a brush wet with gun oil down the bore and get any gas fouling wet while I'm at the range, while the guns are still warm from shooting.

I might leave a gun sit wet for a few days until I can get to it, but it will be cleaned. If I'm going to use the same gun again shortly I may just relubricate and wipe the bore before my next shooting session. A wet dirty gun will run a lot longer than a dry dirty one.

BSW

Sam1911
January 9, 2012, 07:14 AM
Some guns get cleaned right away. Definitely if they've been eating corrosive ammo.

Most guns get a wipe-down if they're going to be stored for a while.

My comp & carry guns get cleaned every 500-750 rounds or so, whether they need it or not. I shoot a fair bit and have tested them far enough to know that I stay well within the round count that starts to put me in danger of malfunctions.

One_Jackal
January 9, 2012, 07:19 AM
After shooting my guns I always clean them. All guns function much better when clean and lubricated properly.

Sam1911
January 9, 2012, 07:25 AM
All guns function much better when clean ...Many rifles do not hit their best accuracy potential until they've had a few "fouling shots" down the barrel after a cleaning.

And, as I said, I run many hundreds through my handguns and some rifles without cleaning, and have never detected any operational or performance difference between a mildly dirty gun and a perfectly clean one.

The only time I've actually seen fouling cause a problem was with a 1911 that I shot weekly, uncleaned, and unlubricated, until it actually started to slow down. When it stopped going reliably back into battery -- something around 1,500 rounds, IIRC -- one squirt of the usual auto trans fluid lubed it right back up and it kept on running.

'Course, it also had an old, weak recoil spring so that was part of the problem.

I really wouldn't say "all guns function much better when clean." I've just never seen an example of it in my uses.

beatledog7
January 9, 2012, 07:31 AM
I remember Army armorers admonishing soldiers to turn in their weapons cleaner than when they got them.

Draw a clean and lubed weapon, put 30 rounds through it, scrub the crap out of it with bronze brushes, lube it, turn in it. Repeat daily.

I think that's why they wear out so fast.

flhtcuibyhd
January 9, 2012, 07:48 AM
Hello. My name is flhtcuibyhd and I can't stop cleaning my guns! Please help.

Arkansas Paul
January 9, 2012, 07:51 AM
Pistols get cleaned when the mood strikes me, usually every 2-3 range trips.
Rifles get it at the end of each hunting season.
Obviously BP gets cleaned ASAP.
The .22s get cleaned when they start jamming.

fpgt72
January 9, 2012, 07:53 AM
Depends on the gun....my 10/22 will get cleaned when it will not run any more...same with a few of the bolt guns....others like my PSL, Krag, and other vintage stuff gets cleaned every trip even if only 5 rounds go down them.

I will also say that if I sell something it would be clean...that is just the way things should be done.

Fatelvis
January 9, 2012, 08:22 AM
I like buying a gun used that has barely (if ever) has been cleaned. I think alot of guns get damaged by people "cleaning" them, who don't know what they are doing. Also the uncleaned guns usually have unbuggered screw heads, and you can bet nobody tried to crack it open and "smooth things up", or some other home gunsmithing operations!

Manny
January 9, 2012, 08:36 AM
I truely think it's entirely possible to over do the cleaning, especially bores. Unless you have a rough bore most of the time you should be able to go several hundred rounds at least without cleaning. I thunk a lot of folks are figuring this out, I've read several tests in the last few years about how a freshly cleaned & oiled bore will often shoot to a different POI then a seasoned bore. For the average joe who just goes to the range and runs a box or less through his pet dear rifle and then scrubs the heck out of the bore I think it's overkill by a large margin.

For the action and such, when the crud gets noticable I think a least a cursory leaning and lube are in order, with the lube being the more important of those two steps. Myself, I really don't like cleaning guns and shoot no corrosive ammo. Bore snakes are my friend for a quick clean and lube, clean the crud from the action as indicated and a quick wipe & lube of external parts to prevent corrosion and call it good generally. Only if I find some indication this is not enough do I go into full blown cleaning mode. I'll generally have at least several hundred or more rounds through a weapon before I fee a full cleaning is in order. Then again most of my guns aren't highly polished show pieces but instead are Glocks, stainless Ruger DA's etc... which don't tend to need much babying.

almherdfan
January 9, 2012, 08:36 AM
I've traded/sold a few guns just after a range session, so they were mildly dirty when they changed hands.

I enjoy taking a new to me weapon and cleaning it before taking it out. It's a kind of foreplay.

I'll clean depending on circumstances. I will usually run a few wet/dry patches after a range outing, but only use a brush when I run a few hundred rounds through a gun. If I have a few hours, I'll be more thorough.

Fatelvis
January 9, 2012, 08:42 AM
I enjoy taking a new to me weapon and cleaning it before taking it out. It's a kind of foreplay.
I feel the same way.....But it does give new maning to the term "gun lover"! (rim shot please!) :uhoh:

303tom
January 9, 2012, 08:44 AM
I clean guns just about everyday...........

jblackfish
January 9, 2012, 08:45 AM
No, you're not the only person who cleans his guns. I do a field strip cleaning after every match and periodic detail cleaning as well - it's also a time to check the gun for any issue that might have otherwise go unnoticed....and I make sure any gun that I sell is clean too. No one wants to buy a gun, get it home and find that it's filthy - you proved that.

Batty67
January 9, 2012, 08:49 AM
I too am a bit anal about cleaning my guns. I've learned to only run a bore snake through my Ruger 10-22 every other range trip (though I clean the action after shooting). I'm working on cleaning my guns much faster, which means less intensively. Sometime I won't shoot because I do not feel up to the chore of cleaning them (and that is kind of messed up)...

jblackfish
January 9, 2012, 09:16 AM
I too am a bit anal about cleaning my guns. I've learned to only run a bore snake through my Ruger 10-22 every other range trip (though I clean the action after shooting). I'm working on cleaning my guns much faster, which means less intensively. Sometime I won't shoot because I do not feel up to the chore of cleaning them (and that is kind of messed up)...
I hate to see you NOT shoot because of your cleaning practices. I have had that thought but never let it stop me from going to the range when I can. My advice, shoot anyway and clean later. You don't have to clean it (them) the minute you get home. It'll wait a day or so - guns are "tough" and they can take it. ;)

Tim the student
January 9, 2012, 09:28 AM
I clean them when its time.

PedalBiker
January 9, 2012, 09:29 AM
I hunt with the bore fouled from sighting shots. After the season ends I clean out the bore.

Everything else gets cleaned every trip to the range.

I've noticed some gun shop guns have a bunch of dust quite often. The green bores aren't just dust, though. I'd guess a bunch of used guns haven't been cared for well.

A friend of mine showed me his hunting rifle, it still had mud on the stock. He didn't seem to even notice. But then, I put my cricular saw away coated in saw dust...

Picher
January 9, 2012, 09:35 AM
There's an old saying, coined during the black powder days: "The sun must not set on a dirty gun."

Being a hobby gunsmith and a person who used to keep my varmint bore fouled during season and ruining it because it was stored in an apparently moist environment, I try to clean all my centerfire guns the same day they're shot, or the next at the latest.

There probably isn't going to be much corrosion on guns in the arid states, but here in the East, we have damp basements and very humid summers, so guns not cared for can pretty rusty.

All guns are wiped down that day, but .22LR bores aren't cleaned often, except for handguns, which are always cleaned. They don't really need to be, because the wax on all .22LRs will preserve the bore as well or better than most preservatives. (That doesn't apply to .22 WMR or .17 HMR rounds, since they're jacketed.) The biggest problem with .22 LR handguns is that they shoot really dirty, both revolvers and semi-autos, so they can have FTF or FTE issues if not kept pretty clean in the breech or cylinder areas. Buildup on the bolt and barrel faces are reliablity issues. Dirty cylinders cause extraction problems for DA .22LRs, but single-actions poke 'em out regardless.

wingman
January 9, 2012, 09:35 AM
We tend to live in a throw away society that includes tools, homes, cars, by and large growing numbers don't clean, use it abuse it and toss it, seems to be the motto. For me if I purchase a product with hard earned money I take care of it, but on up side it keeps the consumer based economy running.;)

txgunsuscg
January 9, 2012, 10:02 AM
I don't clean my guns religiously, by any means, but if I sell a gun, it gets cleaned well before I turn it over. If some guy just paid me a couple hundred bucks for a gun, the least I can do is clean it for him.

zonzin
January 9, 2012, 10:11 AM
I clean mine after every use or extended time in the wood. Thats the way my daddy taught me.




.

SharkHat
January 9, 2012, 10:17 AM
I enjoy cleaning my guns. However, I tend to clean after every couple of outings, unless it's gonna be a while before they come out again.

HOOfan_1
January 9, 2012, 10:19 AM
Clean mine after every range trip, except for my hunting rifles, when I check the zero before hunting season I will leave them fouled, but will oil the outside. I just cleaned my deer rifles yesterday, mopped the barrel with Ballistol and then ran a dry patch through to get out the excess.

I can some Hoppes Copper solvent through my 30-06, about 5 soaked patches, all came out blue, then let it sit for 3 hours, when back out and ran a dry patch through, came out as blue as the windows XP task bar at the bottom of my screen. After I had finished cleaning out the Hoppes and went through with a few Ballistol soaked patches, I looked at the bore and saw shiny copper still in the lands.....:banghead: seems like all I did was polish up the copper still in there.

SlamFire1
January 9, 2012, 10:19 AM
It is impossible to fully express my distain for the average gun owner who never seems to clean their firearms.

The number of firearms that I have seen that were never lubricated, never cleaned, put away dirty, exceeds by a large margin those that show obvious signs of care.

This poor pistol, which I bought, if only they had cleaned out the barrel. The previous owners, and I met them, had not. This was owned by a lady in her 70ís and it was her Grandmotherís pistol. The barrel is a sewer pipe.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Pistols%20various/Stevens%20M43%20Single%20Shot/DSCN1326.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Pistols%20various/Stevens%20M43%20Single%20Shot/DSCN1334JStevensSingleShotPistol-1.jpg

jblackfish
January 9, 2012, 10:23 AM
It is impossible to fully express my distain for the average gun owner who never seems to clean their firearms.

The number of firearms that I have seen that were never lubricated, never cleaned, put away dirty, exceeds by a large margin those that show obvious signs of care.

This poor pistol, which I bought, if only they had cleaned out the barrel. The previous owners, and I met them, had not. This was owned by a lady in her 70ís and it was her Grandmotherís pistol. The barrel is a sewer pipe.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Pistols%20various/Stevens%20M43%20Single%20Shot/DSCN1326.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Pistols%20various/Stevens%20M43%20Single%20Shot/DSCN1334JStevensSingleShotPistol-1.jpg
That's too bad but still a very unusual and great looking collector's item.

ball3006
January 9, 2012, 10:37 AM
I am a C&R junkie so therefore, I clean after every shooting session.....chris3

timhernandez
January 9, 2012, 10:51 AM
I clean after every range session. Saw a guy almost lose his life once because he didnt keep his weapon clean and it failed him when he needed it.

MtnSpur
January 9, 2012, 11:09 AM
Recently took possession of a 1976 Colt DS that on the outside looked new and bore was shiny as well as the cylinder chamber walls. Opened the cylinder and it seemed rather stiff but, ok, maybe it wasn't opened that much. Put some snap caps into it and cycled the action. Stiff. Hmmmm says I. Popped the sideplate and it looked like varnish on the internals :cuss:. About and hour or so later and lots of Gun Scrubber, CLP, Q-tips, etc I buttoned her up and the trigger pull is wonderfully smooth, the cylinder opens and closes nicely and all is well. Just because someone cleaned the bore and cylinder chambers doesn't mean the gun is clean. So YES, I clean the weapon stem to stern and then some.

Sam1911
January 9, 2012, 11:23 AM
1976 Colt DS Ok, to be very fair here, the vast majority of revolver owners shouldn't be pulling the side-plates of their wheelguns -- certainly not on an old Colt.

If you have the correct screwdrivers, and a light touch, and have an informed idea of what you're doing -- and you shoot the revolver a lot -- you might want to really clean out the wheel works every year or two ... or three. But those aren't designed and intended to come apart after every single use, and I'd consider it abuse if they did. (Not that I care what you do, per se, but that I wouldn't want to buy a revolver knowing that the owner did that.)

The issue you faced with a 35 year old gun is that the old lubricants had dried out and solidified and did need to be removed and the gun properly lubed. Once. If that had happened once a decade you'd not have had the problems with it you initially had.

chez323
January 9, 2012, 11:26 AM
I clean mine after every trip to the range just like dear old Dad taught me too. And if/when I sell a gun I make sure to give a good cleaning before I hand it over. Common courtesy if you ask me.......... guess it's not that common. :)

Sky
January 9, 2012, 11:27 AM
I am still someone who cleans after shooting because I may not shoot that particular gun for months on end. I am not as concerned as I once was as far as malfunctions go because of the range I go to.

The range has rental guns that are lucky if they get a few squirts of Breakfree CLP through them a couple of times a ????. I have actually cleaned a few of the range guns ( before they were sold) on occasion and like the AR you mentioned you purchased they were beyond dirty. The machine guns do get a squirt of CLP before they go to the range almost every time but even they to my knowledge never get cleaned.

The owner thinks if the weapons are used they tend to be self cleaning; probably some truth in that......His weapons his range so who am I to say otherwise or argue with success. The biggest effect all this had on me was to become a believer in Breakfree and not be paranoid about keeping a military spotless weapon......

Robert
January 9, 2012, 11:28 AM
Depends on what I am shooting and how often. Milsurp corrosive ammo will get a cleaning as soon as I get home. My competition AR will get cleaned at the end of the season. Some 1500 to 2000 rounds later. I don't keep an exact count.

rodregier
January 9, 2012, 11:42 AM
I clean occasionally/as needed. I don't shoot black powder or corrosive ammunition,
nor do I live in a warm, humid climate, so corrosion isn't a big issue.

If I was selling a firearm, I would clean it beforehand. A clean used product is easier to sell too :-)

mgmorden
January 9, 2012, 11:43 AM
Depends.

My competition gun I typically clean the magazines after every match (they get dropped in mud, sand, etc and get pretty gummed up). The gun itself I typically will clean the barrel and give everything a light wipe down every 3 or 4 matches.

My other guns its an as needed thing. If they start developing problems, or if it gets rusty (ie, hunted in the rain or something), then I'll clean it. Other than that - never.

Naturally I make an exception for my black powder gun but it doesn't get out of the safe but maybe once per year.

I think for the most part though a little too much fuss is made over cleaning. I know people who have had guns that they shot for several decades without them ever seeing more than an old sock + WD40 on the outside to get the rust off, and those guns were still working just fine.

postalnut25
January 9, 2012, 11:47 AM
If I shoot something, it gets cleaned soon after. When I take my kids shooting it may take a few days to get all their guns clean, but it will happen. With my duty gun, it gets cleaned immediately after a range trip or qualification. Also, the duty gun gets wiped down and checked every week, or before the end of my shift if it got snowed on.

Rshooter
January 9, 2012, 11:58 AM
After being in the Corps and overcleaning guns for years I am careful to clean my guns after each range session. I do not scrub them and search out all dirt every time though. That's for quiet evenings when I have nothing else to do.

788Ham
January 9, 2012, 12:12 PM
Whats the big deal about cleaning a used firearm? My God, its not like its the same as a root canal. I was always taught to keep it clean, if you're going to use it, clean it. If I'm at the range for a session, soon afterward on my arrival home, I'll run some Hoppes down the barrel, let it set a few minutes, then continue to clean it with bronze brush and more Hoppes, simple as that. As far as taking ownership of a filthy firearm, if the dude can't clean it after buying and shooting it, what else has he subjected it to that you don't know about? Hoppes and cleaning patches are too cheap to not use, don't know about running tranny fluid and CLP through them though, mine never get that bad !

Stophel
January 9, 2012, 12:40 PM
I always figured I was the only one who ever cleaned his guns. I don't think I have ever seen a used gun for sale on a dealer's table at a gun show that was clean. Bores dirty, chambers dirty. Come on, man, you're trying to sell it, at least run a patch through it a few times!!!!

rustedangel
January 9, 2012, 12:51 PM
We tend to live in a throw away society that includes tools, homes, cars, by and large growing numbers don't clean, use it abuse it and toss it, seems to be the motto. For me if I purchase a product with hard earned money I take care of it, but on up side it keeps the consumer based economy running.;)

This is actually false, and a great (and often repeated) example of Frederique Bastiat's broken windows fallacy. In his original example, the argument was that having a stone break your window was good for the economy, because it caused you to give business to the glazier. In reality, if you were not buying a new window because it had been broken, you would have likely spent the money on a new suit, or a steak, or some other thing you wanted, and still had a complete window. So no, destruction of otherwise working goods does not improve the economy.

Now that said, I only clean my guns every 2-4 range trips. I mostly shoot a stainless Ruger Mk III and a Glock, and they just don't seem to me to need to be cleaned every time. In fact I think I could go a lot longer on cleanings for the Glock, but I figure if I already have my kit out I might as well.

Mike OTDP
January 9, 2012, 12:57 PM
I was raised on black powder. Which means that cleaning is reflexive.

That being said, I once owned a Walther GSP that would not cycle reliably until it had 20 rounds through it. Reliable as a brick after that, but it needed the fouling to slow the bolt down enough to pick up the next cartridge.

snakeman
January 9, 2012, 01:01 PM
as a general rule my shoot often guns get cleaned every 100 rounds. My hunting guns every
two months and my safe queens every 3. I do however clean my hunting guns every time they have blood on them or get the slightest bit damp.

dev_null
January 9, 2012, 01:06 PM
Even if it was a gun I didn't clean obsessively, I would certainly clean it before selling it. Not only common courtesy (which is about as 'common' as common sense), it's just good marketing.

Mauser lover
January 9, 2012, 01:19 PM
I clean my Mauser after every time I shoot it. I detail strip all of my other guns after I shoot them (not hard with a Marlin bolt action .22) except revolvers. It is just a question as to how long after I shoot them, meaning how many times I took it out again, that I get to them.

Nushif
January 9, 2012, 01:38 PM
I "mess with" my guns a lot, and because o that I tend not to use the truly "good stuff."

I have seen a lot of military guns with finishes removed because people were beaten into "getting any black off" and have had to clean a lot of guns very harsh-like daily, even though they sat next to me indoors all day.

Cleaning a gun to a certain point is good, no doubt about it. I myself field strip a gun, run some brushed over all of it and a boresnake through the bore until I can see the rifling real well and leave it at that.
Once in a while I will detail strip it, brush it and leave it at that.
Daily brass brush cleanings are not something I'm going to subject my finish to, even though just about every Marine I've eveer talked to will tell you is a failure waiting to happen.
Incidentally all the guns I treat this way run best when dry. Let's just say that I like running my guns dry, and mildly dirty, simply because the specific ones I have perform best like that.
Now, if I had a finicky precision rifle I'm sure I would treat it differently. Seeing as I have a RIA Compact ... no reason to treat it like that.

Ignition Override
January 9, 2012, 02:02 PM
All are cleaned-except for the old .22-within about a week of use. Especially the M-1 Garand.

If you recently installed a Tech Sight on an SKS, after how many rds. do you remove this sight, in order to clean the bolt carrier etc? My interest is to prevent rust and cumulative mechanical wear.

One thing is for certain: if each SKS had been built in the US, not only would they cost much more, but people would neither neglect nor abuse them so much.

Miked7762
January 9, 2012, 04:36 PM
If you recently installed a Tech Sight on an SKS, after how many rds. do you remove this sight, in order to clean the bolt carrier etc? My interest is to prevent rust and cumulative mechanical wear.

Not a Tech Sight, but I had a B-Square scope mount on my Norinco for years which prevented the receiver cover from coming off. I shot about 2000 rounds per year through it for five years (I miss those $50 crates of 7.62x39) without taking it off. Two or three times per year I would remove the trigger group and stock which gives pretty good access to the receiver through the hammer cutout. Compressed air, brake cleaner, and RemOil did a good enough job of cleaning things out. When I finally did remove the mount there was no rust or abnormal wear, just a bit of crud in the recoil spring and inside the bolt carrier.

medalguy
January 9, 2012, 06:40 PM
I clean all of my guns after each and every range trip. I guess I started doing this long before I went into the military, having started shooting at about age 12 or so with surplus rifles using corrosive ammo. This was back around 1960. I always thought a clean gun was a better functioning gun, and nothing I've seen since that time has changed my mind.

Frankly I can't understand letting a gun go until it stops functioning before cleaning it. How often do you change the oil in your car or truck? I change mine every 3,000 miles and I currently have 285,000 miles on my primary vehicle and it still runs like a top.

Sauer Grapes
January 9, 2012, 06:56 PM
All my guns are clean right now. Next weekend something will be dirty. Most times I'll do a quick field strip and just run a patch down the tube. Cursory wipe down and put them away.
If it's only been 50 rounds, I don't bother.

B!ngo
January 9, 2012, 07:14 PM
The best way to address the OP's question is to observe some behavioral and skills trends ongoing, at least as I see it.
Since I was a kid, I was mechanically inclined and motivated (by my father) to engage in all things mechanical. I service and modify my cars, do work around the house, build computers and the like.
I'm also kind of neat an tidy. Was always that way. I think it's in my DNA as well as my fathers Army training washing over me. And being a Navy guy didn't hurt either.
But as I get older, I observe that the number of my contemporaries who are either mechanically willing and able and/or have an attention to detail and cleanliness seems to be waning. Fewer and fewer men and women seem to care as much about these things as our predecessors. They call for a plumber instead of doing it themselves. Or throw something away and buy new instead of fixing it. And it's these two qualities that are needed to take good care of their guns. Both the desire to keep things clean, and the ability to engage mechanically to do so.
So as the number of gun owners increase and the total of people with the skills and desire to maintain them shrink, the OP's observations will grow.
B

GCBurner
January 9, 2012, 07:29 PM
If anyone wants a real Adventure In Gun Cleaning, they should pick up one of the "untouched" Martini-Henry .577-450 rifles from Nepal that IMA has imported. These were stacked in an arsenal in Katmandu before 1900, and haven't been touched or cleaned in 130 years or so. Some of them turn out surprisingly well, once all the grime and yak grease are cleaned off.
http://www.ima-usa.com/militaria/antique-guns/untouched-guns/british-p-1871-martini-henry-mkii-short-lever-rifle-1880-s-dated-untouched.html

GoWolfpack
January 9, 2012, 08:06 PM
Some people are just cleaners. My FIL scrubs his grill down with windex and paper towels every time he uses it. Same with the miter saw and the pressure washer. I've never seen outdoor power tools so immaculately clean. Every hunting rifle he owns (and that's quite a few) gets cleaned at the beginning and end of hunting season, shot or not. I don't think he owns a gun with a spot of rust or fouling on it anywhere. And bully for him.



It is impossible to fully express my distain for the average gun owner who never seems to clean their firearms.


I'm pretty sure the language filter wouldn't let me type my response to that. Guns are machines, not little people. I'm not denying them anything they're due by not cleaning them. Gun cleaning for any purpose other than preventing corrosion is for the benefit of the owner, not the gun. Kinda like a funeral is for the living, not the dead because they don't care anymore.


I clean my guns when the mood strikes me. I carry a Glock so that I don't have to worry if a ball of pocket lint is going to jam it when I need it. I've sold dirty guns before to people who looked them over carefully, saw the dirt, and bought them anyway. Don't like it? Don't buy it.

Sam1911
January 9, 2012, 08:11 PM
But as I get older, I observe that the number of my contemporaries who are either mechanically willing and able and/or have an attention to detail and cleanliness seems to be waning. Fewer and fewer men and women seem to care as much about these things as our predecessors. They call for a plumber instead of doing it themselves. Or throw something away and buy new instead of fixing it. And it's these two qualities that are needed to take good care of their guns. Both the desire to keep things clean, and the ability to engage mechanically to do so.
So as the number of gun owners increase and the total of people with the skills and desire to maintain them shrink, the OP's observations will grow.


I wonder. I've done the gear-head thing since I was young. Disassembled and reassembled engines, transmissions, transfer cases. Serviced every vehicle we've ever owned myself, and upgraded/modified a good many of them, too, including building custom suspension parts. Learned plumbing and electrical work in the field and by the code. Design buildings and run construction projects for a living. Make knives, handload ammo ... hell, I even delivered two of the kids myself here at home (though my wife says she had a hand in it).

And that's lead me to think a lot about efficiency and reliability and the ways things really work. And to test things out and see where the rubber really meets the road.

So when I want to find out how reliable a 1911 might be, I may just run it week after week in practice to see when it really starts to become unreliable. Then I know, or have a pretty good guess, when it would happen again. I run guns and put them away dirty and pick them up next time and check for rust or other problems, and shoot them, taking mental notes of any poor performance or other issues. After years of that kind of testing, I've come to believe that -- now that we're using non-corrosive priming compounds and minimally fouling gunpowders, this habitual cleaning obsession is really pointless, if not counterproductive.

I know, for an absolute FACT (to whatever degree someone can know these things) that I can run my xDM for 1,000 rounds straight without a stoppage or slowing, or even a need for lubrication (under most conditions). I expect I could get nearly twice that out of it without extra lube, but I don't know that for sure. I don't generally do that. Usually I'll clean it at the halfway point or so, knowing I have plenty of reserve reliability in that system before I could reasonably expect any trouble at all.

So what then is the point? I'm a pretty confident type of guy so I don't need to brag to anyone about how clean my gun is, and I know it's going to work through the round count I'm running, so I have no other reason to decrease my maintenance interval.

Jim Watson
January 9, 2012, 08:20 PM
Most of us would rather spend the time it takes to clean a gun on the Internet asking what the cleanest powder is.

Serenity
January 9, 2012, 09:11 PM
This makes me feel a little better. We went to the range yesterday without cleaning since the last trip for the first time since we got the guns. They will get cleaned tonight, though. We put a box through each one on a trip, usually.

Both of my used guns were dirty when I bought them. And they had both been traded in by shooters with excellent reputations in our area. :confused: I suspect that they stopped in at the local LGS after a trip to the range to see what was there and traded in for something they fancied. They were both on consignment so the LGS owner just put them under the counter.

Watching a youtube video and then cleaning the gun, especially the P226, was an excellent way to get acquainted with it. With the Sig I was completely unfamiliar with autoloaders (and a little intimidated) so taking it apart and cleaning and reassembling it took the mystery and uncertainty out of it. (I'm just talking about field stripping and cleaning under the grips; they will get a thorough cleaning at the shop by a pro when the time comes.)

I like cleaning the guns. We sit at the table and the Boy cleans the 38 special and I clean the Sig and we chat. Quality family time :)

B!ngo
January 9, 2012, 10:55 PM
I wonder. I've done the gear-head thing since I was young. Disassembled and reassembled engines, transmissions, transfer cases. Serviced every vehicle we've ever owned myself, and upgraded/modified a good many of them, too, including building custom suspension parts. Learned plumbing and electrical work in the field and by the code. Design buildings and run construction projects for a living. Make knives, handload ammo ... hell, I even delivered two of the kids myself here at home (though my wife says she had a hand in it).

And that's lead me to think a lot about efficiency and reliability and the ways things really work. And to test things out and see where the rubber really meets the road.

So when I want to find out how reliable a 1911 might be, I may just run it week after week in practice to see when it really starts to become unreliable. Then I know, or have a pretty good guess, when it would happen again. I run guns and put them away dirty and pick them up next time and check for rust or other problems, and shoot them, taking mental notes of any poor performance or other issues. After years of that kind of testing, I've come to believe that -- now that we're using non-corrosive priming compounds and minimally fouling gunpowders, this habitual cleaning obsession is really pointless, if not counterproductive.

I know, for an absolute FACT (to whatever degree someone can know these things) that I can run my xDM for 1,000 rounds straight without a stoppage or slowing, or even a need for lubrication (under most conditions). I expect I could get nearly twice that out of it without extra lube, but I don't know that for sure. I don't generally do that. Usually I'll clean it at the halfway point or so, knowing I have plenty of reserve reliability in that system before I could reasonably expect any trouble at all.

So what then is the point? I'm a pretty confident type of guy so I don't need to brag to anyone about how clean my gun is, and I know it's going to work through the round count I'm running, so I have no other reason to decrease my maintenance interval.
So you're the guy who is selling the OP all of those dirty guns! :)
Actually, fair points all. But you may be helping me make my point. You're adept enough in mechanical design, maintenance and quality issues that you are actually testing your knowledge in delaying cleaning on a gun. Somehow, I doubt that most 'non-cleaners' are running similar tests using their experience to calculate the frequency by which they must clean and service their weapons.
OTOH, maybe I'm just hanging around with some lazy and sloppy guys.

VT Deer Hunter
January 9, 2012, 11:17 PM
I clean mine even when i havent shot my guns for months just put put some oil on them. And i should do that soon.

trigga
January 10, 2012, 12:53 AM
I know a lot of people who don't clean their guns, I always try to keep mines clean after each use.

doc2rn
January 10, 2012, 02:51 AM
Most guys dont want to have a spare box of ammo in a caliber they no longer posess, so they take the gun out for one more range trip before it departs. That is usually the reason why IMHO.

Clean the carry bi weekly and the range guns every 500 rds is my usual methodology.

Mick_W
January 10, 2012, 03:08 AM
Clean mine every few hundred rounds. I have bought a used gun from the lgs that was not cleaned even though it was on display. That had surprised me, I would never sell a dirty gun.

Crex39
January 10, 2012, 05:25 AM
I clean mine after each use. Its probably just brainwashing after being in the military. I have much more confidence in the weapon if it has been cleaned and function checked after each use. To me they are too expensive to leave unmaintained. It doesn't matter 5 rounds or 500 rounds. You wipe your butt after you take a dump each time no matter how much comes out.

guyfromohio
January 10, 2012, 05:33 AM
Cleaning is the dessert after a full meal of range time. I enjoy it

Wangmuf
January 10, 2012, 06:28 AM
I have a few fun guns that I'll clean twice a year or so, but they don't get shot much. My daily carry gets cleaned every thousand rounds or so unless for some reason the bore looks particularly bad, which has only happened once with some handloads a friend gave me to burn through after he sold his last .40.

ShawnC
January 10, 2012, 06:49 AM
I clean my ar15 when it stops functioning, my 38spcl when I get bored and almost never for my glock 19, 10/22 and Mosin nagant.


I hope your shooting clean ammo out of that Nagant!

Levan9X19
January 10, 2012, 08:22 AM
2 Topicstarter, now you are not, because after every trip to range my gun room looks like ER surgeon room

however its a fact that due to high tech finishes and clean ammo, modern firearms do not require much cleaning. Also design is evaluating, firearms become more and more reliable.

gp911
January 10, 2012, 08:56 AM
I used to think I was lax about cleaning guns because I let them go for 500 rounds or more, which made them "dirty". After seeing truly dirty guns I think l'm pretty good! I had a friend show me an old airweight he bought that had so much gunk in it l'm amazed it still fired, .22 autos that l had to shake the dirt out of to get them to cycle, etc. If others want to scrub 'em every time they're shot that's fine with me but there's no need to project that belief onto others like it's the one true way to treat a firearm. I've bought dirty guns before (not filthy, but needing cleaned) and l've sold guns with the powder residue still visible. Different strokes & all that...

Probie9
January 10, 2012, 09:27 AM
I'm not OCD about cleaning but they do get wiped down with an oily rag after each use or every 6 months. My carry guns get a visual inspection about twice a week.

I am not nearly as bad as I used to be. New finishes and better ammunition have made a huge difference.

Jonah71
January 10, 2012, 12:19 PM
After shooting my guns I always clean them. All guns function much better when clean and lubricated properly.
same here.

WVRJ
January 10, 2012, 01:45 PM
It depends on the gun.Some of mine lose accuracy after 50 or so rounds and some will shoot who knows how many without any problems.My carry 1911 gets it every two weeks of carry time,but I carry it on the farm a lot and it gets dirty and dusty.The AR gets it about once a month regardless of how many rounds are put through it.Hunting rifles get the outside wiped down every trip afield.Some types need stripped down to get cleaned up good while others don't.I don't like to take any of my better shooting bolt rifles out of the stock until it's neccessary.Any used gun gets taken apart,cleaned and inspected,sometimes before I'll buy it.If the deal doesn't go through,at least the seller to be will get a free cleaning.The last used Bushmaster I bought belonged to a local Deputy,and it was sterile when I popped the pin.To each his(or her) own,but clean means reliable to me.

Migr
January 10, 2012, 01:48 PM
I clean all after every outing except my glocks. They get cleaned, but less frequently.

MuleRyder
January 10, 2012, 01:49 PM
My father taught me not to put a dirty gun away. I'm kinda amazed at some of these responses, I thought everyone cleaned their guns after using them.

Sam1911
January 10, 2012, 02:02 PM
My father taught me not to put a dirty gun away.And lots of dads and grand-dads did.

Remember, all guns used to be wood and blued carbon steel. A few fingerprints would rust the surface quickly. And, even earlier, all ammo would leave salts on the metal that would corrode blued steel overnight. And earlier than that, all guns used black powder and produced lots of corrosive residue and massive fouling so heavy that a dirty gun couldn't even be easily loaded.

There were indeed very good reasons for our ancestors to learn and remember to follow strict cleaning discipline. Kind of like how there were really good reasons to avoid certain foods and observe dietary restrictions back before modern safeguards were put in place and modern medicine identified underlying health risks. Or, brining it back to guns, why revolvers were traditionally loaded, "load one, skip one, load four," so you didn't accidentally shoot your foot. All have legitimate reasons back in history.

But these days, most of us eat pork, and tomatoes, and drink milk, load our modern revolvers with six rounds (or seven, or eight, or nine!) and some of us are starting to see that a "dirty" modern gun will work just as well and last just as long as one that is religiously cleaned after every outing.

788Ham
January 10, 2012, 02:17 PM
I understand your position on this Sam, but there is also a pride in ownership involved here too! If I take a revolver, H&R 922, out and shoot it, along with my 6" Colt Python, they are both going to be cleaned when I get home. Not just because of the Colt being used, but I don't put any of them away without the cleaning first. I've worked hard and long to buy these firearms, just not giving a damn doesn't even enter the equation!

jakk280rem
January 10, 2012, 02:22 PM
Picked up a 10/22 like that at a pawn shop a few years back. Looked to never have been cleaned. The action was so fouled the bolt wouldn't go into battery and the trigger had a 9lb pull. Took the better part of the afternoon to detail strip it and clean it.

Same thing with a blued 5.5" Ruger MKII slabside a year later. It was filthy. And top it off the guy that traded it to me had hose down th bolt to try to give it the appearance of being cared for. It was so sloppy the oil was coming out of the magwell and pooling at the bottom of the case.

Sam1911
January 10, 2012, 02:29 PM
just not giving a damn doesn't even enter the equation! Did I give you the impression that I don't clean mine every time because I don't give a damn?

Surely not.

Do I feel pride about owning them? I'm not sure. I like them, and enjoy shooting them, and like sharing them with others, so I guess that might be a kind of pride of ownership. (In the end, stuff is just stuff.)

If it makes you feel good to clean them that often, and to look at them in the safe lined up shining and beautiful without any fouling on them, then that can be a reason to clean them every time.

But to say that it makes them shoot more accurately or more reliably just isn't true, most of the time.

Many posters here have said, "I clean every time I shoot. And just look at this example of a gun that was never ever cleaned." As though there were two choices -- meticulous, obsessive, religious cleaning, or abject neglect. Surely we don't have to believe that.

Nor do we have to believe that if you care about your guns and value them you will clean them after every session -- without any clear physical need to do so.

It appears to me -- though I won't say it absolutely is the case -- that a lot of the folks who use their guns a lot (competitors, self-defense carriers, and such) tend toward a utilitarian view of cleaning. And that folks who tend toward more casual, occasional uses -- or collectors & military recruits -- tend to more of the "veneration" model, where cleaning is part of the ablution ritual performed by the devotee. And that's fine, but it seems that it is difficult for either side of the question to look on the practices of the other without a raised eyebrow of superiority. And that's not nice.

Skribs
January 10, 2012, 02:36 PM
My floor is covered with dirty clothes. My kitchen is littered with dishes and grocery bags. My desk has an assortment of papers and a collection of Dr Pepper cans. However, even I clean my guns after every range trip.

UKarmourer
January 10, 2012, 03:00 PM
Its probably the armourer in me, a dirty weapon is a sin- that I punish accordingly!

I currently work at a recruit training depot, an I can safely say I have seen it all as regards to dirty weapons!:banghead:

Personally I clean my shotgun after every trip to the range

X-Rap
January 10, 2012, 03:14 PM
Some almost insinuate poor upbringing if one doesn't clean their guns before the sun sets. I agree fully with Sam and I am willing to bet I have a few laying around that haven't seen a cleaning rod in years and maybe since I have owned them. I do keep a rag soaked with some type of oil in each safe so that I can wipe them down when handled but that has little to do with the topic IMO.
My go to hunting guns might get a bore snake and a rubdown after the season but most of them are stainless so that is even a rarity.
Back when I used to fire 100's of rounds on a prarie dog town I would swab a barrel after a couple hundred rounds and still do with my AR's if I shoot hundreds in a weekend but if I miss it I don't worry much.

Hit_Factor
January 10, 2012, 03:22 PM
I shoot too many matches to clean the guns after each.

Usually four or five guns are selected each year as my primary guns. These will get cleaned twice during the year. If I notice them acting up, adding oil is the solution. Anywhere from 3000 to 6000 rounds will have been fired in these guns.

Carry guns get cleaned after a range session.

Safe queens get wiped off if I can't remember the last time they were looked at.

Prophet
January 10, 2012, 04:01 PM
My Dad always made us clean our guns every time we used them. The guns were cleaned or you didn't go to bed. I've never even considered not cleaning my gun when I get home from hunting, etc. I guess it's just habit. Plus, we live in a relatively moist climate so things like to rust. If you don't at least run a snake with some oil on it down the barrel and wipe the outside with a silicon rag, you're gonna be working the rust out on your next serious cleaning.

VT Deer Hunter
January 10, 2012, 04:21 PM
I clean mine after each use. Its probably just brainwashing after being in the military. I have much more confidence in the weapon if it has been cleaned and function checked after each use. To me they are too expensive to leave unmaintained. It doesn't matter 5 rounds or 500 rounds. You wipe your butt after you take a dump each time no matter how much comes out.
Coming from a military man right there! 100% true! I trust a clean gun, i dont want to risk it shooting a unclean gun that may have rust in the bore.

ChCx2744
January 10, 2012, 05:15 PM
There are many people out there that never clean their guns. I'm not exaggerating either, there are gun owners out there that never clean their guns. It worries me sometimes.

Grmlin
January 11, 2012, 01:55 AM
When my father passed I aquired his guns and as I have been going through them I noticed in his later years he didn't clean as often as when I was a kid. I try to clean shortly after I shoot then they go into a gun sock and into the safe. At one time his guns and mine sat in a safe for almost 4 yrs, never touched until I went home and picked them up. Remarkably I haven't found any bad rust or damage. It's been over a year know and I still haven't finished cleaning. I have also noticed that brand new guns always seem to be dirty.

mljdeckard
January 11, 2012, 02:10 AM
The reason Army armorers are picky is because their arms rooms are subject to inspection at any time, or they may need to do a massive turn-in, and if they person in charge doesn't think they are clean enough, the armorer either cleans them himself on the spot or takes them back home. The Army damages weapons from overcleaning.

And no, not all guns function 'much better' when properly cleaned and lubed. I had a Glock I could run hard and dirty and it never made a difference. My SKS is a running abuse experiment. My dad shot a bajillion rounds through his 10/22, which I later inherited, and proudly proclaimed that he even cleaned it once or twice. The only time I ever saw it malfunction was when using a cheap aftermarket magazine. I have a friend who has an AR he built for competition that has seen THOUSANDS of rounds, and he has cleaned it precisely.....NEVER. Just runs it sloppy wet.

This isn't to say I never clean, but I'm much less anal about it than I used to be. My carry gun gets cleaned every few hundred rounds. My .22 conversion gets hosed with gun scrubber every few hundred rounds. My hunting guns get cleaned at the end of the season, my 700 VSSF in 22-250 actually gets cleaned bu a specific process, but really, for the most part, I save redundant maintenence and butt kissing for my wife. (Lest she cease to indulge my hobbies.)

Ignition Override
January 11, 2012, 02:33 AM
Until 2007 my only gun was an ancient 40's Savage .22 rifle. We lived in Jackson, MS, then KC, but were not raised around guns.
The .22 had been seldom used, never cleaned since my grandfather died in '77. Regarding that gun, frankly I was a slob, but then my attitude quickly changed in middle age, as I began to buy about fifteen classic military rifles.

Not only do I clean each of them within days of use, but despite having been very neglectful, I now can not imagine expecting anybody to consider Buying a Dirty Gun, at least one with a Dirty Bore and Chamber/Bolt.

Any potential seller who has time to eat potato chips in front of a game has time to clean a gun when the cheerleaders do their ' Heiny wiggle', unless he decides to disrespect both the gun and a potential seller by willfully ignoring such a simple, minor task, which requires about ten minutes. Many of our decisions are a personal choice.

Why buy a gun from a slob? They even bring them to Memphis-area gun shows, whether on their shoulders, or onto tables. They can clean a bore which has minor/moderate fouling in about five minutes.

OneLiveRound
January 11, 2012, 02:54 AM
AK gets cleaned every 6mos or so (Saiga 12 gets cleaned with it)
AR gets cleaned after every use (gets run wet , lubed with Mobil 1)
PX4 gets cleaned once a month (G19 gets cleaned with it)
Mosin gets cleaned after every 4th or 5th use
336 Marlin gets cleaned after every use
590A1 gets cleaned every 6 mos
Colt 1911 XSE gets cleaned & lubed after every use (does not go into sonic cleaner)

All weapons get cleaned immediately if they have been in the wet or have gone through 2temperature extremes (cold outside to heated home, or AC at home to summer heat) due to condensation.

Pistols are put in a sonic cleaner , BCG from AR is put in a sonic cleaner. Ar gets lubed with mobil 1 , the rest froglube or breakfree CLP.

The frequency of the cleanings have to do with each particular weapons intended use , and type of ammo used.

I'm very anal with the 1911 and AR.

wolf695
January 11, 2012, 03:11 AM
I clean mine too! I admit if I could get someone to do it for me, blackpowder guns, rusts quickly! I clean my hunting guns after every season!

The Sarge
January 11, 2012, 07:19 AM
After shooting or once a year.

GoWolfpack
January 11, 2012, 07:23 AM
At one time his guns and mine sat in a safe for almost 4 yrs, never touched until I went home and picked them up. Remarkably I haven't found any bad rust or damage.

So guns sat for four years untouched with virtually no physical damage, and this means they should be cleaned more often?

I save redundant maintenence and butt kissing for my wife.

There it is, right there. Truth in its purest form.


I've got an old Anschutz smallbore target rifle that so far as I know has never been cleaned. Most competitive shooters I met in college never cleaned their target guns.

Sam1911
January 11, 2012, 07:28 AM
I've got an old Anschutz smallbore target rifle that so far as I know has never been cleaned. Most competitive shooters I met in college never cleaned their target guns.


Yes, that was considered extremely bad ju-ju. Some heretics cleaned between seasons, but most didn't.

Kind of like the sweatshirt you wear under the 3-position jacket. Never wash that! Important layer of magic builds up in the fibers and helps guide the bullets. And, of course, no one will "borrow" it, either. :uhoh:

stonecutter2
January 11, 2012, 07:37 AM
I try to clean when i'm done with a range trip, however i really don't worry about it UNLESS I've shot corrosive ammo through the gun - then it's clean up time ASAP. Sometimes I'll let guns sit (when shot with non-corrosive ammo) for weeks before cleaning. But it stays on my to-do list until I do it.

My home defense Glock 19 gets a good clean frequently, even when i haven't shot it and it's sat around for awhile. I just like keeping it in really good shape in case I need it. I also like getting out my guns periodically to clean because it helps me make sure that no corrosion has occurred, and because i find it kind of fun to make sure a gun is in nice, clean shape.

tnxdshooter
January 11, 2012, 08:57 AM
Nope your not the only person that cleans his guns. I clean mine after every range use or asap there after. On new guns I clean them out real good then shoot them and then clean them again.


Sent from Droid Incredible on Verizon Wireless

Davek1977
January 11, 2012, 10:14 AM
788 Ham Said:
just not giving a damn doesn't even enter the equation!

Disagree if you must, but not cleaning every gun after every outing DOES NOT equate to "not giving a damn" in the slightest. Every gun I own is in perfect working condition. That said, NOT every gun was cleaned before putting it away. Just because someone doesn't follow YOUR cleaning procedure DOES NOT mean they don't give a damn about their guns. I treasure my guns...I take pride in them, and yes, I want them to be reliable. That doesn't mean every time the firing pin hits a primer that I need to clean my gun, however. Its just not necessary, and in some cases, can actually have adverse effects on the gun. Heck, if I cleaned that religiously growing up, the only things I'd have ever accomplished were shooting...and cleaning


At one time his guns and mine sat in a safe for almost 4 yrs, never touched until I went home and picked them up. Remarkably I haven't found any bad rust or damage Four years? I have an Ithaca Lightening X5 22semi auto. The gun belonged to my father, but being mainly utilitarian with his guns, hung it up in the gun rack when he acquired a BL-22 he liked much more. Fast Forward 15 years or so, and suddenly my dad has a son (me) interested in firearms. The Ithaca and also his Western Field .410 and Marlin 336, which had not been shot for a decade, maybe closer to two, were rust free and in perfect operating condition. If stored in a relatively stable environment, one shouldnt EXPECT their guns to become rusty or inoperable due to time alone. While every gun should be checked for rust periodically, I wouldn't EXPECT rust under normal conditions

asia331
January 11, 2012, 10:16 AM
USMC taught me to clean'em when I use'em; still do.

xfyrfiter
January 11, 2012, 11:18 AM
Even stainless steel will corrode if subjected to perspiration or salt spray, so on carry gun, yes, it gets a once over with a silicone treated cloth twice weekly. On all of my others they are in various stages of cleanliness.
I wore 2 rimfires out with over cleaning, pins and screws can only be removed so many times without wearing the threads and holes to an oversize or sloppy fit. At the time I was shooting 1500 to 2000 rounds weekly, tends to wear other moving parts out as well.

MtnSpur
January 11, 2012, 11:41 AM
Ok, to be very fair here, the vast majority of revolver owners shouldn't be pulling the side-plates of their wheelguns -- certainly not on an old Colt.

If you have the correct screwdrivers, and a light touch, and have an informed idea of what you're doing -- and you shoot the revolver a lot -- you might want to really clean out the wheel works every year or two ... or three. But those aren't designed and intended to come apart after every single use, and I'd consider it abuse if they did. (Not that I care what you do, per se, but that I wouldn't want to buy a revolver knowing that the owner did that.)

The issue you faced with a 35 year old gun is that the old lubricants had dried out and solidified and did need to be removed and the gun properly lubed. Once. If that had happened once a decade you'd not have had the problems with it you initially had.

I agree 100% Sam but I do have the correct tools and it's not my first rodeo. I certainly do NOT recommend taking off the sideplate, especially on an old Colt, as they are very tight toleranced and can be a nightmare to correctly put on. Not for the faint of heart. I might add that she won't be apart again :D . This is only the 2nd revolver I've ever had to resort to removing the sideplate after traditional methods failed to correct the problem (she was not a candidate for sitting in a bath BTW)

X-Rap
January 11, 2012, 01:55 PM
After hearing about Glocks in the dish washer I am looking for one that is the size of a safe.

outboard
January 11, 2012, 04:11 PM
I usually clean my hunting rifles 4 or 5 times a year. Several times in the "off season". I try and run at least 100 rounds or so through each rifle prior to September/October. I'll clean them again prior to the first big game hunt I'm using them for. Last cleaning is post hunting season. .22s are cleaned every 200 rounds. I try to clean pistols and revolvers after every use.

Question: several people stated firearms could be damaged by cleaning too often. How exactly does this happen?

Nushif
January 12, 2012, 12:55 AM
Kind of like the sweatshirt you wear under the 3-position jacket. Never wash that! Important layer of magic builds up in the fibers and [...]

Yes! My wife tried washing my Patrol Cap once ... I couldn't believe it. She's trying to get me killed.

But yeah, I have a healthy dose of JuJu injected in my gun cleaning rhythm.
Basicaly none of the nasty harsh, abrasive stuff.

Crex39
January 12, 2012, 01:11 AM
Question: several people stated firearms could be damaged by cleaning too often. How exactly does this happen?

It doesn't. It is a mental crutch some have come up with to justify non maintenance. I am assuming they are talking about brushes wearing chrome, or over scrubbing to the point where the bluing is affected. If you keep them clean you don't have to scrub the you know what out of them when you get some residue on the internals. This is a silly debate. If you feel comfortable leaving residue and deposits in your fire arms go ahead that is your choice. I suppose my 1997 Chevy Pick up has been over cleaned since I wash it after I drive in the rain and snow, but you know what? Its in a lot better condition than a lot of of them I have seen that get cleaned once or twice a year.

Owen Sparks
January 12, 2012, 01:18 AM
Cleaning was much more important back in the days of black powder and corossive primers. Back then people were taught to "never let the sun set on a dirty gun." This is no longer true but the military still operates as if it was.

Davek1977
January 12, 2012, 01:29 AM
It doesn't. It is a mental crutch some have come up with to justify non maintenance.

not even remotely true....guns CAN be damaged by overzealous cleanings....the crown of the barrel is especially suspect on weapons that cannot be cleaned from the chamber end. Overcleaning...especially when failing to use a proper bore guide, and certainly have adverse effects on the crown, resulting in a decline of accuracy. Other parts too can be worn from constant, unnecessarily dissasembly and reassembly. I'm all for regular maintenance and proper cleaning....but I've yet to be convinced by anyone that a through cleaning is needed each and every time a weapon is fired. Sure, you said you wash your pickup after a rain....but do you pull the engine, drop the tranny, and make sure there are no "deposits" anywhere? Do you remove the tires from the rim "just to be sure" everything is OK? Washing a truck is no differnt than simply wiping down a gun with an oily rag...which is something I DO do, whether I feel the need to actually CLEAN them or not

Serenity
January 12, 2012, 01:42 AM
When I think of it, I mean field stripping it, I guess. Removing the magazine and slide and rod and spring and barrel, and cleaning what I can see with cleaner and a toothbrush and careful around the little bits with Q-tips, then wiping the lint from those off and lubricating it. I've taken apart and cleaned the used magazine that came with my gun, but just once. Are you guys talking about opening it up more and cleaning the guts? I'm not going anywhere near that. I figure if I even manage to fire a decent number of rounds through it, I'll take it to the shop for a once-over.

The revolver gets the same treatment; open the cylinder and clean what he can see.

mljdeckard
January 12, 2012, 03:52 AM
Damage from overcleaning occurs when you are so obsessed with cleaning that you start to wear things out. You toothbrush out the trigger and hammer so much that you start to snag springs, and break off bristles in them. Or you bend the disconnnector. And yes, the obvious one is the crown and rifling. Since the army uses the cheapest, worst cleaning rods you can imagine, and don't care about training soldiers to clean correctly, they routinely clean the wrong direction, jam brushes in the bore and try to remove them by tapping them out backwards, and using the crown as leverage for cleaning tasks. This is usually because they are poorly trained, and their supervisors don't care at all about the long-term life of the gun, that's someone else's problem. I've been issued rifles with the last four inches of rifling completely GONE. It is absolutely possible to damage weapons from overzealous cleaning.

Crex39
January 12, 2012, 05:05 AM
Sure, you said you wash your pickup after a rain....but do you pull the engine, drop the tranny, and make sure there are no "deposits" anywhere? Do you remove the tires from the rim "just to be sure" everything is OK? Washing a truck is no differnt than simply wiping down a gun with an oily rag...which is something I DO do, whether I feel the need to actually CLEAN them or not

Why I am even debating this shows I have too much time on my hands. To me the way you are describing cleaning a truck and a weapon would be a complete dis-assembly. I am talking more of a field strip. With my truck I do wash the undercarriage, rinse the wheel wells and the door jambs, as well as the outside panels. I drop the tailgate and clean the area out between there where dirt accumulates. I do not simply wipe it down with a wet nap. When I clean a pistol, I take the slide forward, remove the bolt, rod and spring, wipe those down, check for debris in the barrel, use the proper size brush if needed (usually because my weapon is maintained it takes little more than moving a clp coated Q-tip type swab down it. Some solvent in a patch over the trigger assembly, and back together. Its not that much work. I do not over scrub with wire brushes or completely disassemble the weapon, nor my truck.

Neo-Luddite
January 12, 2012, 06:08 AM
If you were - like me - trained by someone who grew up in the days of corrosive ammo being the norm----it takes *a lot* of de-programming to convince you that nowadays there is usually a 'more harm than good' point to the cleaning of most weapons in terms of servicability, wear and tear, and corrosion/rust risk.

My general thoughts:
1) If your life depends on the weapon, seek expert council on THAT weapon from someone who knows (or keep your own as you might if *you are* THAT person!).

2) Antique/special/heirloom/ (esp. Colt Bluing!) clean gently w/ modern materials and monitor closely for signs of decay in both wood and natural stock materials like wood and real 'hard rubber' and early sythetics like bakelite or vulcanite (although bakelite is one tough customer even when it is near the one-century mark--hurray for Leo!).

3) Or, come to the point (like me) where you just really don't much care OR will select an 'already dirty' weapon to shoot from your rack to continue on your later-life found lazy path. I do always take care to let weapons sweat after shooting and at least wipe down the blued ones.

Davek1977
January 12, 2012, 07:29 AM
One thing that made me kind of smile in this thread....it was asked if you'd trust your life to a dirty gun. My thoughts on that are I'd rather have a gun that I could trust slightly "dirty" than one that had to be immaculately clean in order to be fully trusted.

Sam1911
January 12, 2012, 08:44 AM
it was asked if you'd trsut your life to a dirty gun. My thoughts on that are I'd rather have a gun that I could trust slightly "dirty" than one that had to be immaculately clean in order to be fully trusted.

Yes indeed.

In fact, WHY would you trust a gun that had just been disassembled and reassembled? Would you not be significantly safer with a gun that had been (at least) function fired a few mags' worth to make sure everything went back as it should have and no extra bits of cleaning rag, bristles, debris, etc. got lodged somewhere they shouldn't have?

I don't ever take a freshly-cleaned gun to a match -- that's just begging to find that some pin wasn't seated fully or that I managed to put a spring in backward. I always put at least a week's practice session through the gun before an important shoot.

Why would carrying a defensive gun be any different?

Clean guns are NOT to be trusted!

axeman_g
January 12, 2012, 09:21 AM
i would be embarassed to ship out a dirty gun. I would hate for the new owner to think I was I lazy gun owner. But I have recieved many dirty guns.

Cluster Bomb
January 12, 2012, 09:51 AM
#1 thing I do when I get a gun is clean it. The Colt trooper I got was filthy aswel but all clean now.

Most people dont know how to clean a gun, let alone disassemble it and reassemble it. Theyll just sell it when it "stops" functioning well, blame it on the gun and buy something else and write a bad review online like they know anything about guns....just saying.

GoWolfpack
January 12, 2012, 10:11 AM
Most people dont know how to clean a gun, let alone disassemble it and reassemble it. Theyll just sell it when it "stops" functioning well, blame it on the gun and buy something else and write a bad review online like they know anything about guns....just saying.



I have some serious doubts about that particular scenario actually happening very often. You've got to shoot a modern gun an awful lot before it stops working. Most people just don't shoot their guns that much.

Byrd666
January 12, 2012, 10:28 AM
One round or a thousand rounds, my firearms get cleaned the same day they were shot.

Dr.Zubrato
January 12, 2012, 11:23 AM
HD guns get cleaned as if my life depends on them, because it does. I have not reached a failure point yet in thousands of rounds so I remain cautious about maintenance.
22's get cleaned when they start to malfunction, or every 1-2k rounds.
Every responsible gun owner who cleans their firearms has amuch better and intimate understanding of how their particular design operates, and critical wear parts that need to be inspected or lubricated.

JohnBT
January 12, 2012, 06:10 PM
"Am I the only person who cleans his guns?"

Yes, want to clean all of mine? :)

Strykervet
January 12, 2012, 07:11 PM
Most of us would rather spend the time it takes to clean a gun on the Internet asking what the cleanest powder is.
Ha ha! No joke, it REALLY makes a difference! The H335 powder grimes up my 6.5G AR much worse than an M4 using M855 (and whatever they use in it). You can really tell in an AR, that DI is real fine for simple function and accuracy but really funks up the action.

I like to clean mine after, but when I take several to the range and stay all day, I just don't get around to it. I SHOULD at least wipe them down real good, I can do that pretty fast, and then hit 'em with the dental picks later. Besides, unless you clean them while still hot (fastest way) then wiping them down and "soaking" the action until you get around to it is the best way. Hoppes will soak into the grime and makes the carbon come off much easier if you do this. Running a mop down the bore with a moderate amount of CLP isn't bad either, but too much can actually trap water and make it rust.

As for changing oil in my truck, it gets changed about twice a year. Wife's car too. These are '05's and they run fine, the truck is still like new, but only has about 25,000 miles on it. I use the expensive Mobil 1 full synthetic. If you run this stuff, you can run it for quite awhile before it breaks down. It doesn't seem to go bad near as fast as regular oil. Where regular oil would be BLACK GRIME in 5000 miles, synthetic is only starting to look like 1000 mile regular oil.

I've read more than once that synthetic can be ran for, no joke, up to 15,000 miles. I first changed it at 3000, then that seemed like a waste, then went to 5000, then went to about twice a year. Works out to be average for the car, overkill for the truck, but it needs to be changed at least bi yearly even if you don't use it. I used to be real religous about changing oil until I started using this Mobil 1. If you use their filter, it seems to last even longer. BTW, those KN air filters are pretty nice too; they last much longer and are easy to clean.

When using a weapon for defense, it STAYS clean. I'd wrap my rifle up to keep sand, and worse, dust out. Still, I'd clean it everytime I had down time. We'd wrap the M2's and Mk19's up real good --NOTHING sucks like cleaning a good greased up one of those after a drive through moon dust. My carry pistol, a Glock, it stays clean too, although due to the design it can go much longer than just about anything else, so my target pistols tend to get real quick cleanings. Not having to oil them up a very much really helps. When you depend on it, carrying dirty gear is kind of stupid --it'll never work better dirty than it does clean if it is worth using.

Finally, carrying an M4 or MG during daily downpours or constant moon dust presents a challenge. This one unit of POG's, they did the dumb army stuff. They'd clean their rifles DRY after an exercise, they may have learned to use pressure washers with hot water watching us but didn't do the other stuff afterwards (bad to do, but it works great every once in awhile with a MG). They may have been using shaving cream too, that is another trick (who figured that out and how I don't want to know). The rifles looked real good, real clean and would pass a white glove test. No joke. Then when they actually went to a range to shoot 'em (they shot just enough to qualify, once or twice a year) these BRAND NEW M4's started having parts failures. In at least one, the bolt carrier broke in half. The part had basically rusted from the inside out over time. Never seen anything like it, but it wasn't the only one in that unit to have problems, the barrels were just trashed but brand new. So sometimes over cleaning is bad, especially if you remove ALL of the oil on the metal, cleaning with water, yet keep it dry enough not to rust.

Seen one guy try and armor-all his pro mask for an inspection, but that is another story. Yep, seen it all.

CZguy
January 12, 2012, 07:34 PM
This is just idle curiosity but, I was wondering if there was any correlation between cleaning guns and making beds, or washing cars etc.

BTW, those KN air filters are pretty nice too; they last much longer and are easy to clean.

I really like K&N air filters. I use them in both the car and truck.

7thCavScout
January 12, 2012, 07:45 PM
After all my years in the Army I am a little OCD when it comes to my firearms. The are ALWAYS kept in a high cleanliness.

BearAZ737
January 12, 2012, 09:18 PM
Seriously!!! I traded a crappy garage ar15 for a Glock 23 and it looked to have been used very little but when I got it home and pulled the slide back it was filthy!! It was like a mixture of fine sand, grease and dirt... Weird.. Oh well its nice and shiny now!

mljdeckard
January 13, 2012, 02:50 AM
I use full synthetic too.

And yes, it is a different ball game if you have weapons regularly exposed to the moon dust in Iraq.

AK_Maine_iac
January 13, 2012, 03:13 AM
I must be sick or something. I enjoy cleaning my guns and take pride in doing so. I strip them down to the frame after every range trip, or after every trip out into the field.
I also do the same to my safe queens that don't get fired more then once or twice a year. They get a complete cleaning.

My Dad was old school U.S.M.C. leather neck. He always said if a man did not shine the heels of his boots, clean his weapon, it meant he did not wipe his butt.

GoWolfpack
January 13, 2012, 06:02 AM
I would submit that prior to the point of physical damage to the gun cleaning is entirely up to the owner and has nothing at all to do with how much he "cares" about them.

Beak50
March 7, 2012, 01:37 PM
I'm just curious because my wife says I have O.C.D. when it comes to cleaning my guns.

verge
March 7, 2012, 01:43 PM
Every time I come home from shooting.

Sam1911
March 7, 2012, 01:46 PM
<Threads Merged Again>

GoWolfpack
March 7, 2012, 01:52 PM
Good on ya Sam.

o Unforgiven o
March 7, 2012, 01:52 PM
Always after shooting them, or taking them out. Like hunting, I may be out in the woods for 6-8 hours and not fire a shot. That doesn't mean they aren't covered is sweat, water, and all the other woods debris that comes with pushing through the thick stuff. In that case, they will get cleaned thoroughly.

If I just walk out into the backyard and shoot maybe 5 rounds, they will get a good wiping off and a pass or two with a bore snake. So really it depends but at the very least it will be wiped off, oiled and get a pass with a bore snake if it has been shot, or just wiped off if handled.

gunguy0829
March 7, 2012, 02:17 PM
I hear all the time of people not cleaning them but once in a while, like my buddy says he has been to the range 2-3 times this year and has yet to clean them, makes me growl, For me they get a good cleaning every time I shoot them 1 round or 1000 and if I have not been to the range, They get a good wipe down once a month, my carry gun gets cleaned once a month and oiled even if i didnt shoot it. If i do shoot it the above statement holds, it gets cleaned, sometimes I go to the range once a week

gunguy0829
March 7, 2012, 02:25 PM
i saw one guys post says he cleans them when they malfunction, wow, uh, hope it doesnt malfunction when he really needs the weapon, my drill sergent used to say, a soldier with a dirty weapon, is a dead soldier

Certaindeaf
March 7, 2012, 02:27 PM
Clean those guns.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=XZHqafQpA5g

nofishbob
March 7, 2012, 03:22 PM
The OP purchased guns that had not been cleaned.

This could be a strategy to hide defects, especially in the bore and chambers.

I am an optimist when inspecting used guns to purchase who thinks (hopes) that all that stuff in the bore is just dirt. Most times it is.

With a spotless gun, what you see is what you get, with no uncertainty on what might be easily cleaned off and what may be a flaw or blemish.

Bob

K15997
March 7, 2012, 04:11 PM
I clean after every trip to the range, especially if corrosive ammo is involved!

majortoo
March 7, 2012, 06:44 PM
I clean after every trip to the field or the range. However, I know that not everyone does. Once, as a member of a team from our command's Inspector General, my responsibilities included a check of the small arms. The inspected command included both Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and the armory included several hundred M14 rifles and M1911 pistols. My inspection indicated that the weapons had not been cleaned in some time; dirty bores, and primer marks around the firing pins. A Marine Gunny was in charge of the armory, and I guess that he was not expecting a look at the weapons, even though the inspection had been scheduled several years in advance. I think that he had delegated the task of cleaning to some junior Navy enlisted men. Obviously, they did not perform and he neglected to follow up. Management lesson.

Serenity
March 7, 2012, 06:48 PM
Last month I didn't clean between range visits and then we ran into someone we knew out there and exchanged guns for a few shots and I was SO EMBARRASSED. :o I will never skip cleaning again.

Walking Dead
March 7, 2012, 06:49 PM
I clean my CCW weekly. It's about the only way to keep the lint out of it.

hso
March 7, 2012, 07:28 PM
I just got a P35 LW rebuilt into a Commander style carry gun with all the goodies to make it equivalent to the Cylinder and Slide BHP LW. I've run 250 rounds through it since Saturday without cleaning it. I intend to clean and lubricate it and run another 100-200 through it this weekend before cleaning it again and carrying it.

BIGGBAY90
March 7, 2012, 07:37 PM
A clean gun is a happy gun

exavid
March 7, 2012, 08:56 PM
I clean my .22 target pistol about every 200 rounds. I use it for Bullseye shooting and don't want any misfires or other problems during the 100rd evenings. My other pistols and long guns get cleaned when I think they need it. It varies because different powder and loads make for different fouling and leading rates. I've loaded up a bunch of .40S&W hard cast lead bullets and tend to clean my SR40c after a range session with that pistol. the 10/22 gets cleaned when it looks cruddy because it really doesn't seem to care. Other guns cleaning intervals depend on use and purpose. My LCP and LC9 get the most cleaning right after a range session because these are my primary SD carry weapons.

exbrit49
March 7, 2012, 09:57 PM
Call me stupid , call me whatever, but my guns, without exception get a thorough cleaning after EVERY use. I paid good money for all my firearms and I want them to last and also look good. I am also finicky about accuracy and keep the bores spotless. After the cleaning a light coat of oil is applied and I am ready for the next range session.
Of course I keep my cars, Motorcycle and pretty much ALL my possession are clean. of course the cars dont get cleaned after every drive but as soon as they show signs of looking dirty, they get cleaned.
Its called PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP!

I was at the range today and came back and cleaned 3 pistols and two rifles as well as reloaded 190 rounds. (naturally that was after tumbling and cleaning the brass).
Thats the way I am
Each to his own but I would think that with todays high prices you would want to clean and lube after every session and keep you prized posession looking top notch.

CZguy
March 7, 2012, 10:30 PM
I have different standards. Carry guns get cleaned every time they are shot, which is weekly, but range guns only get a thorough cleaning when accuracy falls off. Everything gets wiped down with an oily rag after use.

Dnaltrop
March 8, 2012, 04:51 AM
I clean my EDC as soon as I get home, Other guns might wait 24 hours, but get at least a brush down the barrel and the external residues wiped off.

GoWolfpack
March 8, 2012, 06:51 AM
who doesn't act like a martyr about how often I clean my guns?

My guns are MINE to clean as often as I want, and nobody is impressed with how often you clean your guns. Your guns are yours, you clean them whenever you want and stop acting like you're a modern day saint for it.

To hear some of you talk cleaning your guns makes you Rosa Parks or something. Get over yourselves.

JRH6856
March 8, 2012, 07:18 AM
On this subject...from American Rifleman (http://www.americanrifleman.org/ArticlePage.aspx?id=1945&cid=3)

And this (http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/properly-clean-handgun/)

pockets
March 8, 2012, 08:31 AM
Am I the only one who doesn't act like a martyr about how often I clean my guns? My guns are MINE to clean as often as I want, and nobody is impressed with how often you clean your guns. Your guns are yours, you clean them whenever you want and stop acting like you're a modern day saint for it. To hear some of you talk cleaning your guns makes you Rosa Parks or something. Get over yourselves.
No sir, you are not the only one.
That doesn't mean I have several dozen rusty firearms laying around on the basement floor.
It just means I maintain those several dozen firearms to my personal specs.
I don't disassemble my vehicle's engine every month and scrub the cylinder bores with a toothbrush either.
But, like Swayze said, 'Opinions vary". ;)

.

CZguy
March 8, 2012, 10:23 AM
Am I the only person

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

who doesn't act like a martyr about how often I clean my guns?

My guns are MINE to clean as often as I want, and nobody is impressed with how often you clean your guns. Your guns are yours, you clean them whenever you want and stop acting like you're a modern day saint for it.

To hear some of you talk cleaning your guns makes you Rosa Parks or something. Get over yourselves.

Perhaps your life would go more easily if we all thought just like you. But in this imperfect world of ours we all have different opinions, and come here to share them. You may wish to review THR rules for posting, as our moderators don't usually tolerate this type of behavior.

gunguy0829
March 8, 2012, 11:40 AM
When people wait to clean their weapons, I agree, its up to you when you do it, however, waiting isnt smart. What if something happens and you need the gun you "waited to clean"? Some guy is harming your family and you take a shot and miss, things go from bad to worse all because you didnt feel cleaning your weapon was important. True you dont clean your cars after you drive, but a gun and a car are two totaly differant things, accuracy of a gun partially depends on a clean bore, clean parts to work correctly. My family's life depends on how well my guns work, and if something bad happens because I didnt clean it, well who's fault is that? When I was in the army on deployment it was a daily life or death situation, trust me if I didnt clean my weapon, I may not be here. Not cleaning your gun is your choice, its a free country, do what you want, mine get cleaned, my opinion, I honestly could care less what other people do, Cleaning it is the right thing to do, proven, tested and true no ifs ands or buts about it.

Sam1911
March 8, 2012, 12:14 PM
I agree, its up to you when you do it, however, waiting isnt smart. What if something happens and you need the gun you "waited to clean"? Some guy is harming your family and you take a shot and miss, things go from bad to worse all because you didnt feel cleaning your weapon was important.

My opinion on that is that there is NO conceivable realistic instance in which you could not defend yourself or your family because your gun wasn't clean. If you take a shot and MISS, it is NOT because your gun was fouled -- and if you're accustomed to making such excuses for poor shots you really need to a) get better training, and b) be more honest with yourself.

As I said before:
In fact, WHY would you trust a gun that had just been disassembled and reassembled? Would you not be significantly safer with a gun that had been (at least) function fired a few mags' worth to make sure everything went back as it should have and no extra bits of cleaning rag, bristles, debris, etc. got lodged somewhere they shouldn't have?

I don't ever take a freshly-cleaned gun to a match -- that's just begging to find that some pin wasn't seated fully or that I managed to put a spring in backward. I always put at least a week's practice session through the gun before an important shoot.

Why would carrying a defensive gun be any different?

Clean guns are NOT to be trusted!


accuracy of a gun partially depends on a clean bore, clean parts to work correctly.Not really. Not in a defensive, close-to-medium range weapon. Not to any conceivable degree that could matter.

I shoot ~ 1,000 round between cleanings of my defensive and competition guns. I see no measurable accuracy loss over that number of shots. None. None AT ALL.

Clean parts to work correctly? No. They require serviceable parts that aren't so gummed up as to become UN-serviceable. Not spotlessly clean so you can eat off of them.

If I shot a gun 200 or 300 times, recently, the chances are very VERY good that it will fire the next time I pull the trigger, too. And, due to my own shooting practices I know that, there is a very high likelihood that it will keep on firing accurately and reliably for at least another 1,000 rounds beyond that.

Pull it all apart, clean it out, and put it back together. Will it fire the next time you pull the trigger? Well, you hope so. You believe so, but you don't know that it went back together just right, no springs are displaced or in backwards, no pins were misplaced, no lint ball is hung up on some critical part that you didn't notice.

Shoot it and you'll KNOW it's right. You can't trust a CLEAN gun.

gunguy0829
March 8, 2012, 01:03 PM
Well, my combat experiance shows, a DIRTY gun can not be trusted, combat is a lot differant than shooting steel stationary targets that dont shoot back, dirty guns jam, miss feed, stove pipe, proven, in combat, case closed. I have had friends die because of jams from a weapon jamed with sand and dirt, sometimes you go through 3 to 4 hundred rds. in a battle or more, in a lul, the first thing we did was clean our life line, what you do is your business, i dont care, this is my opinon, so dont get your g string twisted, i stated, this is what i do, if you do good with a dirty gun than fine, thats your thing, i dont care, i have REAL world shooting experiance and I know what can happen with a dirty gun. That being said, after i clean my hunting rifle i will take it to the field with one round fired from it cause it does better, but that means one round not 1000.

gunguy0829
March 8, 2012, 01:09 PM
oh, and if your argument is that when you clean it and the next time you shoot you are not sure it will work cause you dont know you put it back togeather right, than one you didnt table test it, or do a functions test, therefore you shouldnt own a gun, mine go back togeather perfect every time, I know they work, no doubt in my mind, they will work, they will be accurate and, no i dont miss, no choice, i cant miss, mine and my family depend on me not missing, i know how i shoot under stress, i.e when bullets are flying by your head and your buddy gets hit next to you and oh, look a mortar, what else could happen, i can block that out and make effective shots at moving targets, and when its done, no one sits there and cheers and claps, and hands me a trophy, we just move on to the next mission.

Sam1911
March 8, 2012, 01:10 PM
Heavens! My apologies! I thought you were talking about self- or home-defense with guns that might be dirty from range use. I didn't realize you were talking about combat and weapons jammed with sand and dirt!

My comments apply to guns that might be a little fouled from a few days of competition or practice. Not fighting in the jungles of Vietnam or the dunes of Iraq. All depends on where you call "home," I guess! ;)

X-Rap
March 8, 2012, 01:17 PM
Who has their thong in a knot?
I didn't think this discussion was over cleaning a gun after a combat action. If I were out dragging my rifle through a muddy rice paddy or spent the last 24 hrs in an Iraqi gunfight or sand storm then no doubt that gun would be scrubbed cleaned. If I just went out back to run through a couple mags and test a new hand load or pop a coyote then probably not so much. The same would be true if I was actually looking for the limits of performance from a gun. You are literally talking about a world of difference.


Gosh Sam ya beat me to it but that post involked the same sentiments.

gunguy0829
March 8, 2012, 01:25 PM
well, someone busts into my home and it is combat, may only last 5 seconds, but yes its combat, sand/dirt and burnt powder and other fowling is no differant, dirty parts dont move as well, too many risks for me, would i take a dirty gun over a dirty sock, you bet.

gunguy0829
March 8, 2012, 01:29 PM
but again what other people do is their thing, i will simplify it and bring this all back to earth before it gets out of hand (which it probably is anyway)

I clean everytime i shoot and when the gun has sat for too long, You dont? Thats cool, just got a new 686-5, nice revolver, couldnt wait to clean it, just to take it apart and see how well its made, so far looks great.

:)

LongTimeGone
March 8, 2012, 01:35 PM
Thanks Sam. :D

I put my target .22s away without cleaning today for the 3rd time this week.
I'll probably shoot 'em dirty tomorrow.
My HD weapons have had a mag thru them and stored for quick access.
I did clean my carry pm9 after I shot it last because it was 100 wwb.

GoWolfpack
March 8, 2012, 02:24 PM
Heavens! My apologies! I thought you were talking about self- or home-defense with guns that might be dirty from range use. I didn't realize you were talking about combat and weapons jammed with sand and dirt!

My comments apply to guns that might be a little fouled from a few days of competition or practice. Not fighting in the jungles of Vietnam or the dunes of Iraq. All depends on where you call "home," I guess! ;)


I could be wrong, but I'm detecting subtle notes of sarcasm in your response. Always nice to see somebody go heavy on the subtlty.

The last gun I shot that jammed because it was dirty was a Marlin 60 with probably 8000-10000 rounds through it without cleaning. Jammed on some CCI Blazer junk. I'm currently testing my P99 for endurance; I've come between 400 and 500 rounds with no cleanings and no signs of trouble. Can't wait to see how long I can keep this going. Maybe I'll go 1000 rounds then clean it. Maybe not.

sgtstryker
March 8, 2012, 02:40 PM
Guess there are alot of ideas about cleaning guns, huh? Who woulda thunk it? I went from ammo man to A gunner to gunner to squad leader in the Marine Corps. Cleaned alot of dirty weapons. Moved on to a better job but still had to clean my rifle, guess it's a mantra, of sorts. I clean 'em when I shoot 'em. My wife hates the smells but, I think she understands..I HAVE to clean every new gun I get, another ritual. My EDC is a G23, I disassemble and lube it for peace of mind, regularly. Some foks never clean their guns and never change the oil in their vehicles either. Ain't America Great..

Sam1911
March 8, 2012, 02:54 PM
I could be wrong, but I'm detecting subtle notes of sarcasm in your response. Always nice to see somebody go heavy on the subtlty.


Well, I was actually at least partially serious. It DOES depend on what you're putting your guns through -- or putting through your guns. If I've been on a two-day shoot in a downpour, dropping mags into knee-deep mud puddles (sounds about average for a big match!) there's no way I'm leaving that gun in that condition -- or trusting it to be ready to shoot with mud caked in it.

If I was hunting in inclement weather, I'd be cleaning right away. No interest in abusing my guns.

If I did a prolonged training course with my home-defense shotgun or carbine and the course was high-round-count, using field-expedient positions and realistic scenarios (read: down in the dirt) -- oh, yes! They're getting cleaned.

But if we're talking about my competition and carry guns and the regular use I put them through -- no. I know these guns, know how long they can keep going, know how long it's been since they were lubed, know what makes them malfunction. I have faith that comes through a lot of experience.

gym
March 8, 2012, 03:45 PM
I clean my guns everytime I fire them. Also my pocket gun every month. Anything else is just lazy, and asking for trouble. The only way you find out if there is a crack or metal fatigue is ti dissasemble the gun, if you don't then don't be suprised if it fails one day.
All guns should get at least a once over every 6 months, even if not fired.

CZguy
March 8, 2012, 11:21 PM
Guess there are alot of ideas about cleaning guns, huh? Who woulda thunk it?

You ought to see a cleaning thread over at Rimfire Central. :eek:

Crex39
March 9, 2012, 07:44 AM
Guess there are alot of ideas about cleaning guns, huh? Who woulda thunk it?
You ought to see a cleaning thread over at Rimfire Central.
__________________ I guess this should just about sum up the thread

One_Jackal
March 9, 2012, 08:18 AM
Rimfire semi-auto pistols should be cleaned very often. The firing pin is very short in most rimfire semi-autos to prevent accidental discharges. It doesn't take a lot of gunk in there to cause a lot of "clicks."

If you carry a rimfire pistol for deep concealment you should take the slide off it and brush the cartridge seat each time you do some plinking.

golanglobus
March 9, 2012, 10:14 AM
I do a detail strip when I buy a gun, new or used. Some are dirty, some not. Either way I want to check overall condition, see how it operates, grease contact points (big fan of grease), and just generally get to know my new toy. I know, I know guns aren't toys, but... yes they are. It's fun for me. I also think I use a bit more potent bore solvent than some of the more popular ones(1:1 kroil:shooter's choice), and I always end up pushing black and blue patches out of the shiniest bores. A beautiful sight to MY eyes.

I also detail strip and oil everything once a year whether it's been fired or not. My basement can get pretty dank in the summer and I just have those cheap sheet metal safes down there. I neglected a .22 rifle that I store for a friend one year and it got freckles. So for me this late winter project is a must. I have no experience with sealed, climate controlled safes.

As far as other cleaning, it depends. If I shoot corrosive I clean right away. I learned that the hard way, too. I cleaned the bore and receiver of an SKS but neglected the gas system once after shooting surplus. The next time I took it out it was a single shot rifle. Oops. Kroil saved the day, it works now, but the gas valve will never be the same.

.22 semiautos get field stripped after every outing, for obvious reasons.

Beyond that I keep things only reasonably clean. I'll usually just wipe down exposed bluing with an oily rag and put it away. I don't usually shoot any more than 100 rounds out of any one gun on any one range/plinking session (except for the .22s, read: truckloads) so I don't see the point in cleaning a reasonably clean gun. They will get a field or detail strip every, lets say... 2-8 shooting sessions, based on whim.

I also have to admit - it depends on the gun and how easy it is to strip/assemble. I have two (roughly) Browning-pattern bottom eject pump shotguns (BPS and Ithaca 37). For me, the receiver/bolt assemblies are a major PITA to reassemble (more-so the BPS), so they get their annual detailing only, and they are lucky to get even that much. My DA H&R Sportsman got detail stripped once. Once. Never again. I came this close [holds thumb and forefinger very close together] to taking a loose baggy full of revolver to a gunsmith, throwing it down on the counter and screaming ,"Here! YOU put this GD effing POS back together!" But I took a deep breath, had a beer, and with all five of my hands was able to get her back together again. Great gun, otherwise - seriously.

SharkHat
March 9, 2012, 10:39 AM
I stated, this is what i do, if you do good with a dirty gun than fine, thats your thing, i dont care, i have REAL world shooting experiance and I know what can happen with a dirty gun.

It's probably best to not assume that you're the only one in a forum like this that has "REAL world" experience, or even combat experience. Don't confuse the fact that someone has a different opinion from yours with the fact that they have no experience in the matter at hand.

knoxy
March 9, 2012, 10:43 AM
I like clean guns. I bought my cz82 at a gunshow. It was spotless and well lubed. Nicely taken care of. All of that vendors guns were squeaky clean. Was happy to pay $50 more for it than the other one at the show that was filthy.

If I'm not shooting it, it stays clean.

gunguy0829
March 9, 2012, 05:52 PM
anyone here who has combat experience knows what i am talking about

Tim the student
March 9, 2012, 06:02 PM
anyone here who has combat experience knows what i am talking about

I think SharkHat summed it up well when he said:

It's probably best to not assume that you're the only one in a forum like this that has "REAL world" experience, or even combat experience. Don't confuse the fact that someone has a different opinion from yours with the fact that they have no experience in the matter at hand.

Mikey Idaho
March 9, 2012, 06:13 PM
Think everyone needs to calm down, get off the internet and go shoot some targets out there in the real world to blow off steam...then clean your gun afterwards haha

Sent from my T-Mobile G2 using Tapatalk

gunguy0829
March 9, 2012, 07:32 PM
just did and and when i got home i cleaned them for 2 hrs. 1 hr. per gun I took, Love it, releaves stress just sitting there getting all the liitle crevises and making it shine. Never does another thought cross my mind.

JRH6856
March 9, 2012, 07:48 PM
Sheesh

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