Long term firearm storage?


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LY
January 12, 2012, 05:59 PM
I will be heading to college in 5-6 months, and I will only get to my guns a couple times a year until I am graduated. I will be storing them at my parent's house, and I need a solution for long term storage. If possible, is there some type of device that can fit under a bed and be safely locked so my curious niece and nephew can't get in to them? If not, I am open to other suggestions.

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LY
January 12, 2012, 06:13 PM
Also, I have some soft gun cases, but from what I hear they are not good for long term storage because they can hold moisture. My mom is stubborn about using the A/C in the summer, and it gets pretty humid here.

marktx
January 12, 2012, 07:30 PM
How many are there? Anything particularly bulky?

The large size pelican case for rifles could probably hold 5-6 if you took the foam out and put them in gun socks to prevent dings. Put some dessicant in and it should be fine.

LY
January 12, 2012, 07:49 PM
Nothing too bulky, largest most likely being a 12 gauge pump. About 4 guns probably, shotguns and rifles

Yukonstorm
January 12, 2012, 08:16 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=storage+bags

Sauer Grapes
January 12, 2012, 09:44 PM
I would store them under the bed or in a closet out of a case. I would just disable them from being functional. Remove bolt, trigger group...etc
Maybe Mom could explain to the kids, THESE AREN'T TOYS! DON'T TOUCH THEM!

I grew up in a house full of firearms. I knew my butt would get "whacked" if I put my hands on them. I never touched them until I was allowed.

LY
January 12, 2012, 09:51 PM
Unfortunately, my niece and nephew live in a household where nobody owns firearms, so they have no idea. I need to lock them up or disable them. prefer to lock them up, though

Pacsd
January 12, 2012, 10:04 PM
get a half way decent gun cabinet with locks. Disable the pieces and store those items in another locked case/cabinet, etc.

OARNGESI
January 12, 2012, 10:52 PM
you can get a locking cabinet for around a 100 that should keep them out

natman
January 13, 2012, 03:56 AM
Get a cabinet for $120 or better still a proper safe.

Coat the guns and their bores with Breakfree COLLECTOR (http://www.break-free.com/products/products_collectorliquid.asp).

Put the gun in a VCI bag (http://www.polygunbag.com/). The 6 mil bags are plenty thick enough for storage.

LY
January 14, 2012, 12:51 AM
I looked and some locking cabinets, and I really like some of them. I will order one of those to keep them in, in regards to the Break-free collector coating, is that something I will have to clean off after every use and reapply? Although I will only be home a few times a year, I will use them when I return.

PastorAaron
January 14, 2012, 12:59 AM
+1 on the breakfree collector coat. Great for guns that aren't seeing much action...or being stashed in 6 inch PVC and stuck in the ground LOL

natman
January 14, 2012, 04:47 AM
I looked and some locking cabinets, and I really like some of them. I will order one of those to keep them in, in regards to the Break-free collector coating, is that something I will have to clean off after every use and reapply? Although I will only be home a few times a year, I will use them when I return.
The nice thing about Collector is that it's the least obtrusive of any coating I'd recommend to prevent long term rust. It's an oil, but it's just slightly waxy so it stays in place and doesn't evaporate. But you can leave it on the gun or easily wipe it off.

It's easier to remove than LPS3 or RIG grease, the other two things I'd recommend and far, far easier to remove than cosmoline, which I wouldn't recommend unless you plan to store them untouched for decades.

Odd Job
January 14, 2012, 06:33 AM
The longest I have stored guns (three handguns) and unpacked them afterward, is 4 years.
The three guns were stripped of non-metallic items as far as possible (such as grips, plastic mag components etc) and then submerged completely in a tupperware container filled with motor oil.
After 4 years in that container it took quite a while to "de-oil" them and assemble them back to working condition, but all three guns were fine.
They were returned to that same container about three years ago and may possibly be confined to that container for many years to come.
Not saying that was the ideal way to do it, but the guns are in a very humid area of South Africa on the coast, and I didn't want them to rust at all. The oil did its job on that count, I didn't see any damage to the guns from the oil.

berettaprofessor
January 14, 2012, 08:21 AM
Well, if you're rolling in it, there's this:

http://www.bedgunsafe.com/bedsafes.html

Or, slightly more affordable, this:http://www.amazon.com/Amsec-Defense-Vault-DV652-Under/dp/B0063263R8

marktx
January 14, 2012, 09:35 AM
Nothing too bulky, largest most likely being a 12 gauge pump. About 4 guns probably, shotguns and rifles

Since it's somebody else's house and a safe/storage locker probably isn't an option I would definitely say that you should go for a large rifle case (Pelican, etc) that you can lock. The big Pelican case is around $200 and is very sturdy / tight sealing but you could probably get a cheaper one that would work just fine. Pull the foam out and put the weapons in gun socks to avoid getting them dinged up against each other. Get yourself some desiccant packs to toss in and as others have mentioned some VCI thingies. My local WalMart has them in the firearms section and they are supposed to be good for about 4 months depending on how often you open the container. My guess is that a sealed case would keep the VCI useful longer than that but it's only my speculation.

xfyrfiter
January 14, 2012, 12:01 PM
Go to your nearest surplus store and look into some of the military storage cases. Some of these are very secure and are made to be nearly impervious to moisture. Add some large dessicant packs, and recondition them when ever you visit your collection.

t32bt32b
January 14, 2012, 11:51 PM
I would place each in one of these preserving bags, head to the nearest bank and rent a safe deposit box. Leave them there. Controlled environment, away from prying eyes and hands, accessible during business hours. That is how I treat my 'safe queens'. I have a safe for guns I use, but for long-term keepers, there are better safes to rent.

ball3006
January 15, 2012, 10:18 AM
Good advice posted above. Get a Stack-on cabinet, around 120 bucks, and use Breakfree collector to wipe your guns down with. Also, I use LPS2 as my gun wipe, similar to Breakfree, and I have never had a rust problem, ever. Some of my guns have been stored in the safe for 10+ years. Another thing you might consider, is to install a locking doorknob on your closet. I have them on all of my closets and bedroom doors. Cost less than 10 bucks. It cost a little more to have them all keyed alike though. Don't forget to pin the hinges so the door cannot be removed by removing the hinge pin. To do this, remove one of the screws holding the door hinge to the door frame. Then screw in a 3 inch deck screw until the screw is about 1/4 inch above the surface of the hinge. Then take a hack saw and cut off the screw flush with the hinge...chris3

floorit76
January 15, 2012, 10:25 AM
I have one that I put away a few years ago that I wanted to keep rust free. I cleaned it well, then oiled it, and vacuum sealed it in a foodsaver bag. Looks fine so far.

rbernie
January 15, 2012, 10:29 AM
Put them in a vapor (VCI) bag and put the vapor bag into a locking case/cabinet. ZCorr bags are reprted to be very good VCI bags; I have been using the StackOn brand for the last couple of years and they are working as advertised.

http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=vci

pistolero guy
January 15, 2012, 10:47 AM
If you dont have a lot of money you can always go this way. taking advantage of some of the excellent advise you have gotten from the guys above:

1) coat with the break free collector
2) buy some good cable gun locks. the kind that go through the receiver and out the mag well with auto pistols or out the ejection port on rifles and shotguns.
3) store in the z-cor bags under the bed.

BeerSleeper
January 15, 2012, 11:05 AM
If you have children unpacking boxes from underneath beds in their aunt/uncle's house, it doesn't sound like you need locked firearms. It sounds like these children need discipline and supervision.

Op didn't mention cost, but being a college student, I will make the assumption the low/lowest cost options are preferred.

A firearm stored separately from ammo is effectively disabled. The drawback to this is you absolutely cannot miss a single round. *IF* you can be certain to get every round, this is an effective method.

Mechanically disabled or locked firearms is a more foolproof method. Firing pins come out, for free. Many guns come with some sort of trigger lock, or a cable you can put through the action and lock. This is free if the gun came with it, or cheap if you have to get a lock or two.

If you still have the cases or boxes they came it, I'd put them back in those, thoroughly oiled, ammo separate, and mechanically disabled or locked. That's how they come from the factory, and they come out of the box rust free after sometimes months to a year on the shelf. Environmental humidity is really only a concern if there are rapid temperature changes sufficient to produce condensation. Humidity in the air only causes rusting if it can condense.

Paulus
January 15, 2012, 11:06 PM
I was out of the country for a couple years and put my pistols into paint cans filled with motor oil. Worked just fine.

Just make sure that the homeowner knows not to through out the old paint cans!

Paulus

LY
January 16, 2012, 03:42 AM
There are many great suggestions coming in, thank you everyone! I do have locks for my guns, the ones that come from the factory. They are very secure locks, but even so I do not want anyone tampering with my property. I will buy a safe/cabinet to store them in, along with either Break-Free Collector or VCI bags. Maybe even toss in a few desiccant packs, it wouldn't hurt

ZCORR Jay
February 28, 2012, 10:46 AM
I may be a bit biased on this topic but the VCI products offer the same protection as greases and oils but with out all the mess. Plus VCI bags are safe on all the other non metal surfaces like optic lenses, stocks, electronics, and even ammo powder and primers.

For the most part VCI bags are all the same, except some will only work with certain types of metals and not others, and it is what the manufacturer adds to the bags to make them better. Most VCI bags will protect for a year or two however our bags also have an exterior barrier layer that locks in the VCI molecules so they can last 5-20 years depending on how often your in and out of them. We also install reusable closures into our bags for added convenience and protection.

Hope this shed some light on the VCI technology.

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