How do you dry your brass


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jbradley
January 15, 2012, 09:21 PM
Leaving the brass out after taking it out of the rotary tumbler and rinsing it off, the get water spots really bad.
Rolling them on paper towels works ok, bt not the inside.
How do you dry your brass if you use a wet method of tumbling/cleaning?

John Bradley
Sanger, TX

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Shrinkmd
January 15, 2012, 09:25 PM
Very simple. Go to Walmart, buy one large fluffy towel. After you shake out the brass in a media sorter as dry as you can, dump the brass on one end of the towel. Fold over enough towel to cover the brass and rub back and forth a bit, rolling the cases. Then pick up that end of the towel and let the whole pile of brass go to the completely dry end of the towel. Then repeat the fold and roll action, and then leave to dry.

I have had spotless brass (well, maybe a minor discoloration inside a primer pocket but oh well) with this method. I could make a video and post it next time I dry a batch...

osprey176
January 15, 2012, 09:57 PM
Why not put them in a mesh bag or pillowcase,and run them in the clothes dryer for a while with a couple old towels?Just wait till the little woman goes to the store.

918v
January 15, 2012, 10:12 PM
I roll them on a towel and let them air dry.

rondog
January 15, 2012, 10:24 PM
I use an old cookie sheet and either put 'em in the oven or on the gas grill, on very low temp. Just enough heat to evaporate the water. Cookie sheet in the sun works too. If I'm feeling particularly anal that day, I'll stand 'em all up first. Air compressor works good too, blow 'em out first then apply a little heat to finish dry. I've even set the cookie sheet on top of a kerosene heater for a few minutes, that works good too.

cfullgraf
January 15, 2012, 10:25 PM
I spread the cases out on a thick towel. I turn them once or twice during the drying process so that any water gets drained out.

NeuseRvrRat
January 15, 2012, 10:35 PM
i put them in a mesh dryer bag like my old lady uses to wash her bras and stuff. then i sandwich the corner of the bag with the zipper in the top of the clothes dryer door. run it on the delicate cycle (lower temps) for about 30 mins.

no banging around, no overnight waiting, and no water spots.

Hondo 60
January 15, 2012, 10:40 PM
Don't get it wet in the first place.

cfullgraf
January 15, 2012, 10:43 PM
Don't get it wet in the first place.

It is the trade off for getting cases to like new clean!:)

NeuseRvrRat
January 15, 2012, 10:52 PM
mine come out cleaner and shinier than a lot of brand new brass i have bought.

38riverrat
January 16, 2012, 12:14 AM
I don't tumble, I just wash my brass in Cascade, rinse, and soak in vinegar. After a good rinse, I drain as well as I can and put in stainless steel bowl. I heat oven to 350 degrees. I use a paper towel to remove any water remaining in the bowl.
Then I turn the oven off and remove the knob. The bowl of brass goes on the rack after the oven has a little time to even out. In the morning, it is nice and dry. The brass is not polished, but clean. My brother in law once put his plastic framed glasses in the oven to set epoxy he was using for a repair. He just had the light on. His wife turned up the oven to about 350 degrees to preheat it for dinner without looking, with predictable results!

rat

788Ham
January 16, 2012, 12:21 AM
After I take mine out of the tumbler { walnut grit }, I dump it into the tumbler again with corn cob to remove any walnut dust, works every time. I know some will say that its double duty to corn cob afterward, but this is done a couple of days before I sit down to reload, I never get in a hurry at reloading time!

CMV
January 16, 2012, 12:45 AM
If i want something dry RFN out of the US cleaner, I use compressed air. I don't have one of those OSHA 30 psi nozzles so as long as the tank is staying above 80 or so, a quick blast at each end has it dry. Might be a tiny bit of moisture left, but by the time I get everything ready to start putting in primers its all bone dry.

Would that work for removing the dust without getting them wet after tumbling - just blast them with air?

788Ham
January 16, 2012, 12:54 AM
I reckin' so. After the corn cob tumble, 5 min. longest, I take them out and they're ready, I don't quibble about a gnats sized piece of grit. If there is a tiny piece, I just blow it off and go on.

NeuseRvrRat
January 16, 2012, 01:17 AM
also forgot to mention that i do my final rinse of the brass in distilled water. seems to help as well.

777TRUTH
January 16, 2012, 05:36 AM
I roll them on a towel and let them air dry.

Same here.

Constrictor
January 16, 2012, 08:37 AM
my brass comes out of the tumbler looking better than new, why would one want to get it wet?

Master Blaster
January 16, 2012, 09:19 AM
I'm old fashioned I dry tumble mine in corn cob with polish in it, about 2 hours and they are shiney, 4 hours and they look like new. No water or stains to deal with. I just bought a 25lb bag of 20/40 for $27 delivered so I'm good for a few years.

cfullgraf
January 16, 2012, 09:54 AM
I use, and like, wet tumbling with stainless pins but agree it is labor and time intensive.

Most of the time, I dry tumble, the outsides of the cases look bright and shiny.

But when the interior of the cases get real dirty, I wet tumble them and get all of the crud out of them. The cases look like new again.

Since my cases are very dirty when they get wet tumbled, it is probably why I find they need to be tumbled 4 to 6 hours. Cases cleaner to start from would clean faster.

medalguy
January 16, 2012, 12:34 PM
Use either deionized water or distilled water. The spotting you are seeing is minerals dissolved in the water, and when the water evaporates the salts are left behind. Distilled or deionized water contains no such minerals and should dry leaving no spots. You can also put the wet brass, after shaking out most of the water, back into dry clean media and tumble for a few minutes. Cob will absorb any water. Then spread the cob out in a pan to dry in the sun.

gamestalker
January 16, 2012, 01:22 PM
I don't ever expose my brass to water. I've been known to rinse them with acetone or denatured alcohol, but never water or water based solutions. If you are that bothered by the media dust, and acetone isn't an option for you, use a Q tip to remove most of the inside media dust.

JohnM
January 16, 2012, 01:26 PM
Yeah, don't get it wet in the first place. :D

ArchAngelCD
January 16, 2012, 03:09 PM
If you really must, a 150 degree oven will do quite well...

oldandslow
January 16, 2012, 05:56 PM
jb, 1/17/12

I'm with many of the other posters who don't get their brass wet in the first place. There are many dry ways to clean brass.

However, I have lately been using the Stainless steel media-wet cleaning method which gives clean brass and primer pockets. I dry my brass in the oven, mouth upwards, on an old cookie sheet with 300-500 cases at a time. Since brass anneals at over 600 degrees most low temp settings are OK as long as it is not too close to the oven elements. I have used settings of 200 and 300 degrees. I checked the cases every ten minutes to determine the drying time needed. Turned out to be 50 minutes for 200 degrees and 20 minutes at 300 degrees. Good luck.

best wishes- oldandslow

Arkansas Paul
January 16, 2012, 06:07 PM
I'm with Hondo 60.

unknwn
January 16, 2012, 07:16 PM
After rolling them back and forth in the large towel I dump them into a brass sorting plastic strainer and hang it above the exhaust side of the dehumidifier that dries out my basement. The air blowing out of the dehumidfier is both warm and dry. After a few hours or so,they are as dry as you could expect. I also use the water that comes out of the dehumidifier to clean them with the tumbler/stainless pins. No salts or mineral spot stains either.

rumblebee1967
January 16, 2012, 07:29 PM
an old or even new food dryer works great. Can be had cheap at 2nd hand stores.

jmorris
January 16, 2012, 08:18 PM
Heated blower with a tray I built for drying dip lubed bullets.

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/reloading/SST/7.jpg

LBEE
January 17, 2012, 07:19 AM
I take my Brass & put on a thick towel, roll them around then let dry, no water spots on mine, However, the water I use to clean the Brass also Has Lemi-shine in it which stops the spotting. I have used a Hair dryer one time to dry when in a hurry which also works good & takes no time at all to dry.

quartermaster
January 17, 2012, 07:27 AM
I clean my brass with an ultra sonic cleaner. When I'm done I blow them off with my compressor after rolling them on a towel. I do the outside, then blow through the flash hole and then the neck. I can load them up right away.

Shrinkmd
January 17, 2012, 07:29 AM
I was worried about getting it wet and then drying it well, but unless you are in a super hurry to use brass the same day you clean it, you really don't need to mess with the oven and possibly damage the brass. Plus wasting the time and energy to add yet another step to the process.

I should make up some cool towels with a picture of brass casings and the thumbler's tumbler and sell it for $40 bucks as a "special brass drying towel."

Muddydogs
January 17, 2012, 10:19 AM
mine come out cleaner and shinier than a lot of brand new brass i have bought.

So? As soon as the brass is removed from what ever cleaning method it starts to tarnish, thats the way brass is. Tarnished brass doesn't hurt a thing, shoots just fine and is going to get dirty once its fired and need cleaned again. I have loaded and prepped brass from 20 + years ago and the color just doesn't effect it in any way. I did clean a few rounds of 7MM once after it had been loaded for 20 years but that was because they were left in a leather belt ammo carrier for probably 10 years and had the nasty green tarnish on them.

Pistol brass gets cleaned before loaded to remove shooting and range grime, dirty rifle mostly from an auto will get tumbled before loading to remove range grime and after sizing to remove lube and brass out of the bolt guns only get tumbled to clean off lube after sizing.

blarby
January 17, 2012, 11:16 AM
I use a wet method too.

At the end of that wet step, they go back in my tumbler for about 15 mins.

I'm sure this wont work in a pin tumbler, but I'm assuming you may still have an old "organic" media tumbler layin around.

NeuseRvrRat
January 17, 2012, 11:33 AM
So?

you do it your way and i'll keep doing it my way. i like shinier brass and that's what i will have. i haven't had problems with tarnishing. i rinse in distilled water, dry them immediately, and wear latex gloves when loading them. i don't think anyone has tried to claim that the shine makes them shoot better. if i was in a hurry to get some ammo loaded immediately for a hunting or range trip and all i had was dirty brass, i would skip cleaning. however, i enjoy my time spent farting around cleaning brass and reloading, so i take my time and do it how i want. i expect all other handloaders to reload how they want as well and i will not criticize their methods as long as they are safe. however, when someone asks my opinion or how i do something, as the OP did, i am glad to share what does and does not work for me.

HJ857
January 17, 2012, 12:07 PM
I wet tumble.

I used to use the actual oven but it does produce an odd smell that I didn't like and my wife liked a great deal less.

To solve the drying issue I bought a used toaster oven at a pawn shop. 15 or 20 bucks I think. I have a sheet of foil over the oven rack and pile wet brass on that foil and bake at 150 degrees for 45 minutes. Works every time. I do towel off the brass before putting them into the oven, but it's probably not necessary. My typical brass prep run is around 250 cases and they all fit in the toaster oven just fine.

whubbard
January 17, 2012, 12:22 PM
I'm new to reloading, but I'll share what I do.
After I tumble them in corn cob / case polish I use my air compressor to knock loose any media that is stuck in the case or primer pocket. If you don't have one, you can find them for around $50-100 and you'll soon find it's a fantastic tool to have around. This also avoids getting the cases wet.

cfullgraf
January 17, 2012, 12:34 PM
i don't think anyone has tried to claim that the shine makes them shoot better.

I will make that claim.

With shiny brass, I feel better about my hand loads so i shoot better!:)

(otherwise known as a self fulfilling prophecy)

CraigC
January 17, 2012, 01:18 PM
Don't get it wet in the first place.

IMHO, you should probably be doing more shooting if you're stressing over how clean your brass is and washing it in distilled water. Silly waste of time, I'd rather be making it dirty again. :rolleyes:

NeuseRvrRat
January 17, 2012, 01:24 PM
it's my time and i'll waste it as i see fit. crappy weather days are perfect for wet tumbling some brass.

i think some folks are just jealous of our shiny brass :neener:

CraigC
January 17, 2012, 01:56 PM
You guys just hiding from your wives or what? ;)

TonyT
January 17, 2012, 02:03 PM
Why bother rinsing off the brass after tumblong?

NeuseRvrRat
January 17, 2012, 02:05 PM
some folks, myself included, wet tumble in various types of medias. i use 5 lbs of tiny stainless steel pins with dish soap and lemi-shine in a gallon of water in a thumler's model B. you have to rinse the soap off after wet tumbling.

popper
January 17, 2012, 02:31 PM
U.S. with Lemishine/detergent and water, dry in toaster oven on alum foil at low heat. Or leave them in the sun on a towel on a sunny day. Or leave them in a collander inside for a few days. Rolling around in a towel seems to remove that hard water gunk, then just let em dry. Most of these newer dryers won't take 100 rifle cases in a sock bouncing around, the tub isn't strong enough and WILL dent.

mott
January 17, 2012, 02:39 PM
in a large stainless bowl with a hand held hair dryer.
I have tried every thing else, air. tumbling, shakin,bakin,sun dry. this works fast for me.

W.E.G.
January 17, 2012, 02:47 PM
Reloading 101

Fire cartridge
Recover spent cartridge
Inspect spent cartridge for defects
Place spent cartridge in tumbler with walnut media
Remove dusty, tumbled cartridge from tumbler
Place dusty, tumbled cartridge on towel
Rub dusty, tumbled cartridge on towel
Squirt case lube on hands
Rub hands on clean, spent cartridge
Place lubricated cartridge in shellholder on reloading press
Lower arm on press to resize and de-prime case
Raise arm on press to remove resized case
Inspect case for defects
Use case gage or other measuring tool to confirm correct dimension of resized case
Place resized case in bucket
Place bucket under bathtub spigot
Run hot water into bucket.
Swish case around in the hot water
Repeat rinses as necessary to remove all case lube
Dump resized case from bucket onto dry towel
Shuffle resized case around on towel to remove most of the water
Leave resized case to air-dry in horizontal position, and somewhere the cat won't pee on it, for ~24 hours
Trim resized case to correct length
Chamfer case mouth
Swage or chamfer primer pocket if necessary
Seat new primer to correct depth in resized case
Expand case mouth if necessary
Pour correct amount of powder into resized case
Seat new bullet to correct depth in case containing correct gunpowder
Crimp case mouth if necessary
Inspect loaded cartridge for defects
Use cartridge gage to confirm correct dimensions

.
.
.
.
.

jl1288
January 17, 2012, 03:41 PM
Wow, some guys get there tighty whities in a bunch fast around here, if someone wants to clean THEIR brass wet, dry, or somewhere in-between what sweat is it off anyone elses brow? The OP was simply asking for a method of drying his cases. For me I use compressed air after a soaking in warm vinegar, and a warm water and dawn rinse. Very simple don't have to deal with dust or media stuck in the cases primer pocket. Good luck op.

Muddydogs
January 17, 2012, 03:46 PM
Reloading 101

Fire cartridge
Recover spent cartridge
Inspect spent cartridge for defects
Place spent cartridge in tumbler with walnut media
Remove dusty, tumbled cartridge from tumbler
Place dusty, tumbled cartridge on towel
Rub dusty, tumbled cartridge on towel
Squirt case lube on hands
Rub hands on clean, spent cartridge
Place lubricated cartridge in shellholder on reloading press
Lower arm on press to resize and de-prime case
Raise arm on press to remove resized case
Inspect case for defects
Use case gage or other measuring tool to confirm correct dimension of resized case
Place resized case in bucket
Place bucket under bathtub spigot
Run hot water into bucket.
Swish case around in the hot water
Repeat rinses as necessary to remove all case lube
Dump resized case from bucket onto dry towel
Shuffle resized case around on towel to remove most of the water
Leave resized case to air-dry in horizontal position, and somewhere the cat won't pee on it, for ~24 hours
Trim resized case to correct length
Chamfer case mouth
Swage or chamfer primer pocket if necessary
Seat new primer to correct depth in resized case
Expand case mouth if necessary
Pour correct amount of powder into resized case
Seat new bullet to correct depth in case containing correct gunpowder
Crimp case mouth if necessary
Inspect loaded cartridge for defects
Use cartridge gage to confirm correct dimensions

.
.
.
.
.
Way to many extra steps here.

tightgroup tiger
January 17, 2012, 04:17 PM
I use a sonic cleaner to clean mine. I let it air dry for a day and put it in tumbler with corncob douced with liquid polishing compound. In a couple hours they have a mirror finish on them. Any crackes in the brass I think are easier to see when they are this clean.
If you use some kind of liquid polishing compound with your corncob media, their is very little dust or debri left in the cases when you take them out.
My tumbler does the work of taking water spots off the cases, not me. I run them in it for a couple hours and go do something else in the mean time.
I have a lot of brass so I don't need to be in a hurry about waiting a day to for my brass to air dry.

280shooter
January 18, 2012, 12:01 AM
I use a old towel. and hair dryer,,,,

jim8115
January 18, 2012, 12:59 AM
I dry them in the oven , set at 220 degrees.........30 or 40 minutes

CraigC
January 18, 2012, 08:31 AM
Wow, some guys get there tighty whities in a bunch fast around here...
No one's drawers are in a bunch here. :rolleyes:

Make a post on the internet and be prepared for reponses to come from every direction. We cannot assume or infer much from a question. I never knew people washed their tumbled brass until I heard it on the internet. Likewise, I'm sure some folks didn't hear that others did NOT wash their brass until they heard it on the internet. Opinions, preferences and perspectives from every direction is a good thing. Sometimes the best solution is the one not asked for. Sometimes you have to know enough to ask the right question.

SlamFire1
January 18, 2012, 11:19 AM
I wash my brass in the sink, rinse it off, and put it in the oven, or toaster oven, in a stainless colander.


Handloader’s Manual
Early Naramore, Major Ordnance Dept Reserve, Small Arms Publishing , 1937

“The best and surest way of drying cases is with the use of artificial heat, but care must be taken not to overheat them, as too much heat will soften the brass and may render it incapable of withstanding normal pressures. Most modern stoves, whether electric, gas, or coal, have oven thermometers that are, at least, fairly accurate. For stoves sold in the United States, these thermometers register degrees Fahrenheit and brass can be heated up to 428 degrees Fahrenheit without undergoing any change in its grain structure. For drying cases it is best to keep the temperature as low as 300 degrees. This heat is amply high for the purpose and offers a liberal allowance for any inaccuracy of the thermometer. If you oven has no thermometer, one can be purchased at small expense in almost any department or five and ten cent store. The thermometer should be placed near the cases as the temperature will not be the same in all parts of the oven. It is also well to place the cases on one of the sliding shelves or racks, away from the bottom of the oven, or the heating element if it is an electric stove.”
I doubt anyone has coal fired ovens anymore; this was written in 1937.

From reading Major Naramore’s book, it is obvious that the gentleman had a technical education in materials or materials engineering. He also worked in an era when the Army actually made rifles, cannons, cartridges and had research labs. Today everything is contracted out and data sharing just does not exist between contractors or anyone else. But then, he could call up an Army buddy and find out who and whom had material data on cartridge cases.

I am surprised that brass will anneal at 428 F, I would have thought, based on the diagram I have, that it is much higher. Still, I put my oven on low, and in a half hour or so, my “five and dime” store thermometers read 212F, and don’t go any higher. Since water boils at 212F (at sea level) I know my brass is dry. I don’t set the oven any higher than warm because all the grease in the oven evaporates on my brass, if the oven temperature increases by much.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/BrassAnnealDiagram.bmp

Nappers
January 19, 2012, 04:26 AM
I have that red media, name escapes me at the moment and the brass comes out reddish, I wash in water with dawn and place in wood shell holder upside down overnight as the holes have a slight hole in the bottom and the wood soaks some water. This after a good shaking in a terry cloth.

Works for me anyways.....

ChefJeff1
January 19, 2012, 11:13 AM
After ultrasonic cleaning, I put mine on a cookie sheet with a wire mesh rack. I light the oven for a few minutes and turn it off. Leave the brass in the oven with the light on overnight. Works everytime.

Ps, I love my Lyman untrasonic!

M2BC2001
November 25, 2012, 12:49 AM
OK here's my problem. I was drying my 223 brass in the oven about 250 degrees. Had to go to work and asked my son to watch them and take them out in about a half hour. 8 hours later, I get home and the brass is still in the oven and dark orange. Are they any good or should I dump them?

Thanks

P.S. He's on my **** list now.

GLOOB
November 25, 2012, 01:34 AM
^Probably just fine. BTDT, down to the awful discoloration, the caliber, the exact temperature setting, and the approx time frame! Wow!

Crush a piece with pliers. Repeat with one that didn't go through the oven. I'm sure they're the same hardness. I've reloaded said cases maybe 3-5 times since then, and not a single issue. Except maybe a couple cracked necks. So no, even the necks aren't annealed!

Crashbox
November 25, 2012, 02:22 AM
I have a convection oven in my basement in which I bake my brass at 250 degrees Fahrenheit for about 30 to 60 minutes, the longer time is planned for bottleneck cases when I get to rreloading 'em.

SlamFire1
November 25, 2012, 10:10 AM
OK here's my problem. I was drying my 223 brass in the oven about 250 degrees. Had to go to work and asked my son to watch them and take them out in about a half hour. 8 hours later, I get home and the brass is still in the oven and dark orange. Are they any good or should I dump them?

Thanks

P.S. He's on my **** list now.

That temperature should not anneal brass no matter how long the soak temperature. A soak for infinity and beyond might cause issues.

What the heck made them orange?

the count
November 25, 2012, 10:17 AM
I roll them on a towel and let them air dry.
+1
In a couple hours or overnight they will be dry.

hdbiker
November 25, 2012, 02:10 PM
I used to use Birchwood Casys Case Bright consentrate with good results.I mixed it in a tall pickel jar.After about ten minuts soaking, rinse in sink,shake out as much liquid as I could,blow the primer pockets out with compressed air and pop them in a pre heated oven,250 degrees or lower,for ten minuts.They always came out dry and very clean,but not polished.The pickel jar was good to save solution for next time.If trimming was needed,I'd hit them with 0000 steel wool to shine them up.After getting my SA 1911 dark stainless Target modle I've gone to a Hornady Tumbler and walnut media.Its all good.biker

mdi
November 25, 2012, 02:33 PM
Wow! Some fellers get real O.C. (Obsessive Compulsive) about attaining ultra shiny brass (intricate formulas for washing, distilled water, and other labor intensive methods). All that's fine, but often new reloaders get the wrong idea about case prep. thinking tubling/polishing is a must do right from the start. Tumbling/polishing brass is largely cosmetic, not a necessity. They may even believe a tumbler is part of a beginner's kit. Just ain't so. No, dies don't wear out any faster with "brown" brass as long as there is no grit/dirt on them. No, defects aren't any easier to spot if you just look. Reload or shoot easier/better, nope. "Pride of workmanship", mebbe, but 99.9% of the time I am the only one to see my reloads and I know how good they are.

FWIW; I reloaded for over 12 years before I found it "necessary" to get a tumbler. I wiped each case with a lightly dampened rag (mineral spirits) as I inspected it before any other prep./reloading. If I wanted "BBQ" brass, I polished each case by hand on a hardwood mandrel chucked in a drill, using very fine steel wool/brass polish (and no, the polish didn't corrode/weaken the brass). I can remember going to the range and I could tell which shooters reloaded their own ammo; those that shot dull, brown brass. The only shooters using shiny, virgin brass were cops and new shooters...

C'mon, water spots on the inside of the cases? Ya gotta be kidding...

straight-shooter
November 25, 2012, 03:19 PM
I just towel dry and then put them in a mesh laundry bag and hang them over the dryer door and close it. I run the dryer on medium heat for 30 minutes and lay them out over night. Ready to load.

murf
November 25, 2012, 06:34 PM
slamfire1,

be careful! that graph shows temp in celsius, not fahrenheit. your brass anneals at 428 degrees celsius. about 750 degrees fahrenheit.

the stress relief temp for brass is about 500 degrees fahrenheit. 300 degrees farenheit should be no problem for cartridge brass.

murf

hubcap
November 25, 2012, 06:58 PM
Use some citric acid (Lemi shine) and a few drops of Dawn. Makes brass super shiny and spot free. Shiny won't make it shoot any better. You only need it clean to reduce wear and tear on your dies.

Coldfinger
November 26, 2012, 12:49 AM
After I pull them outta the sonic cleaner I let them air dry for about an hour, then they get tossed in the walnut for a couple hours to polish and finish drying. Any remaining moisture evaps surfing that time.

Spitzer224
November 26, 2012, 05:35 PM
after the sonic cleaner I wrap them into a towel and use a nylon wire tie to secure them into the center 'bulge'. Then they go into the tumble drier set low with other non-sensitive washing. they come out dry and polished in quick time. Keep the temperature LOW.:D

RustyFN
November 26, 2012, 05:58 PM
I dry tumble mine. They come out dry, dust free, clean as new on the outside and nothing stuck in the flash holes. Tumbling wet is just too much extra work for me.

KevinR
November 26, 2012, 06:36 PM
Soak the cases in Rubbing Alcohol, The water is absorbed by the alcahol and it evaporates in minutes. Then just to be safe I blow each case out with a can of that de-duster air.

oneounceload
November 26, 2012, 08:15 PM
Originally Posted by Hondo 60 View Post
Don't get it wet in the first place.
It is the trade off for getting cases to like new clean!

nope, dry media with some Nu finish and clean as new

M2BC2001
November 28, 2012, 01:48 PM
I thought because of the long time in the heat is why the turned a drak color. Almost orange in color. But you don't think 8 hours in 250 degree heat would effect them?

AABEN
November 28, 2012, 04:35 PM
Leaving the brass out after taking it out of the rotary tumbler and rinsing it off, the get water spots really bad.
Rolling them on paper towels works ok, bt not the inside.
How do you dry your brass if you use a wet method of tumbling/cleaning?

John Bradley
Sanger, TX
Why do you put water on them when they are clean?? I use the corn cob and did not need to clean them with water. I know use the ultrasonic cleaner now. I use a blow drier one the wife did have. Then I let them set over night that way they will cool good and not draw moister!

Hacker15E
November 28, 2012, 07:07 PM
I blow them out with an air compressor nozzle after wet tumbling.

Springfield0612
January 15, 2013, 04:37 PM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7365573#post7365573

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