Stolen gun accessories, and how shops react


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FadingSwordsman
January 23, 2012, 05:38 PM
So, this morning I woke up to a bit of a surprise: My car was all opened up, and a pair of magazines which I keep in the central console were missing.

Now, I'm a little sad to see the magazines gone, but I had an interesting experience dealing with the gun (and pawn) shops around, when asking them to keep an eye out for magazines:

A couple gave me a lecture about how they couldn't really prove anything belonged to me, so they were just going to look the other way (To me, at least. When my SO called, they were much more pleasant and complaint with her) I wasn't too upset, I had no markings on the magazines (Lesson to the wise: Scrape your name, number, or sign on the inside or outside of magazines), and left my car door unlocked, which was stupid on my part.

One of the pawn shops, and one of the gun shops tried to give me a lecture on how now, if they bought any "dime a dozen" 10mm Glock magazines, it would be illegal. They tried to lambast me over the phone, essentially, and one of them even called me back a couple times to try and continue his rant. I certainly know now which shops I will not be buying from in the future.

On the other hand, all of the other LGSs I called were courteous, pleasant, and helpful. So, if you got a call from me, and took down my name and number, thanks a million. I'll make it a point to get my replacements from those LGSs which weren't condescending on the phone. In fact, I'll make it a point to shop at any of the 12-14 shops that actually were nice enough to take my info down.

TL;DR version:
Today I learned:

Don't leave gun accessories in unsecure places
The police don't care as much as they should, especially if it wasn't a stolen firearm
Make unique markings on your non-SNed gun-related objects, which you would be sad to see go. (And, honestly, I could care less if the mags themselves are returned, I would rather see the person who stole them caught)
Call around with your LGSs, and ask if they can keep an eye out for you. If nothing else, you discover which ones are worth patronizing.


Anyone else had any experience with this? Have you been turned off by stores when they're condescending in your hour of panic, when you've either had something stolen or lost it? Anything you've learned that you would want to add to this?

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medalguy
January 23, 2012, 06:18 PM
Um, just welcome to the real world. Keep everything out of sight and all your doors locked. Fortunately you learned this without losing anything really valuable.

As far as the police go, they are so overworked and stressed that they probably wouldn't do anything more if it were a firearm that were stolen. Take the SN and wait to see if it maybe turns up at a pawn shop, and write up a report and file it.

Really, today a lot of stolen stuff isn't pawned any more. The BGs know that the pawn shop detail is checking numbers and IDs. It's more common to have the BGs go to a gas station and sit around until they see a guy in a truck drive up, then approach him and say they are stuck and have no money for gas, and would he buy a power tool or gun or whatever from them for cash. Quick sale, no one knows anything, unless the unlucky buyer gets stopped at some later date and the SN is run and he discovers it is stolen.

Learn from your mistakes. At least you know who the intersted shops are now. By the way, what city did this happen in?

OARNGESI
January 23, 2012, 06:19 PM
You gotta see were there coming from how many identicle glock mags are there around

FadingSwordsman
January 23, 2012, 08:29 PM
Um, just welcome to the real world. Keep everything out of sight and all your doors locked. Fortunately you learned this without losing anything really valuable.

As far as the police go, they are so overworked and stressed that they probably wouldn't do anything more if it were a firearm that were stolen. Take the SN and wait to see if it maybe turns up at a pawn shop, and write up a report and file it.

Really, today a lot of stolen stuff isn't pawned any more. The BGs know that the pawn shop detail is checking numbers and IDs. It's more common to have the BGs go to a gas station and sit around until they see a guy in a truck drive up, then approach him and say they are stuck and have no money for gas, and would he buy a power tool or gun or whatever from them for cash. Quick sale, no one knows anything, unless the unlucky buyer gets stopped at some later date and the SN is run and he discovers it is stolen.

Learn from your mistakes. At least you know who the intersted shops are now. By the way, what city did this happen in?

This was in Albuquerque.

And I figured when I started it's a pretty much lost cause. I may be in some luck in that 10mm isn't the most popular cartridge, and I can only hope that it gives whoever stole it some sort of trouble while trying to sell it.

I certainly hope to learn from this. I'm kicking myself because this happened while I was living another house here, too. (My car was unlocked, but there was nothing I really valued in it.) Usually, I'm a fast learner, but it didn't catch the first time, apparently. Occasionally we all need reminders. =/

tarosean
January 24, 2012, 12:08 AM
This was in Albuquerque.

they have probably already been used in a drive by and a couple hold ups...

maskedman504
January 24, 2012, 12:19 AM
TL;DR more like:

Lock your car.

I had a GPS in my truck and $200 cash in the center console; one morning I went out- I left it unlocked- everything was still there, along with a note sitting on top of the cash.

"You should keep your trucked locked."

BTW, the stranger locked both my truck doors.

They are always locked now.

I still have the note.

Chopdoktor
January 24, 2012, 12:29 AM
If you're driving an 'easy break-in' vehicle like an older GMC/Chevy truck, just be smart and don't leave valuables in it. I always locked the doors on my old '99 s10 Xtreme, and all that got me was a much more expensive damage list: two ruined door skins, as well as two destroyed door latch bezels... Not to mention the $500 in audio stuff that was stolen.

Basically, don't leave more in your car than you're willing to lose. The ol' pry bar/screwdriver under the door handle bezel works every time, if the target is right. It's better to just keep the car clear of stuff worth stealing, and leave the doors unlocked. Crooks always will usually take the easy way in, sparing you the busted windows and jacked up body panels. They leave empty handed, and your vehicle is unmolested.

To top it all off, I discovered the break-in the morning after I graduated from college... Talk about a buzzkill :-(

maskedman504
January 24, 2012, 12:35 AM
If you're driving an 'easy break-in' vehicle like an older GMC/Chevy truck, just be smart and don't leave valuables in it.

Pfft, who drives Chevy's? I got a Ford, brother. :neener:

iLikeOldgunsIlikeNewGuns
January 24, 2012, 01:39 AM
I put numbers on the base-plate of my mags, with a T for my first initial. Helps identify 'em from anyone elses, but more importantly, if I ever have an issue with a particular mag, I know that it's mag #x, and set it aside for fixin.

Chris-bob
January 24, 2012, 02:44 AM
Yeah, I would definitely avoid frequenting the shops that were condescending to me. No matter what the circumstances, they should have merely stated what you already knew, that there wasn't much they could do without any identifying marks. Lectures are not needed.

TNboy
January 24, 2012, 02:45 AM
Glad you didn't loose the whole gun. I just thought of this... Some people, myself included, may not want to permanently put their name, initials, SSN, or other identifying marks on a magazine, perhaps because they might want to sell that gun one day. However as a buyer I wouldn't be opposed to buying a gun that someone had permanently attached the serial number of the gun onto the magazines. Could engrave, or even use a sharpie. I doubt most thieves would even bother removing the sharpie writing. Just an idea.

Thefabulousfink
January 24, 2012, 06:18 AM
A big +1 on locking the doors and keeping things out of sight. I had my car parked on a side street at night in the U district of Seattle for about 2 hours. I came back and found my window smashed and the gym bag that I had left on the passenger seat was gone. They got some old running shoes and sweaty clothes, I got a $250 bill for the window.

I was lucky, because I often used to leave my CCW or a spare mag in that bag if I was going into a Bar or other restricted place. But I learned to keep my car's interior clean. No valuables are left in the open, and all bags or things that look like they could hold valuables go in the trunk. It costs a theif nothing to smash a window and grab a bag, but it will certainly cost you.

medalguy
January 24, 2012, 12:14 PM
Thought so. Albuquerque is not the city it once was. :scrutiny:

bruzer
January 24, 2012, 01:11 PM
I have to chuckle when told to LOCK YOUR CAR. Had my truck locked and the thieves broke the wind wing to gain access and steal. You know what, the wind wing was the hardest part to replace. If I had left my truck unlocked they would have still stole from me but I would not have had so much trouble fixing the damage they caused.

Thieves are going to steal and we as law abiding citizens should not have to lock everything up just to have more damage caused by them. The thieves are the ones doing wrong NOT the poor guy who did not lock up his stuff.
Mike

rodregier
January 24, 2012, 01:23 PM
Next level advice is to secure valuables in the trunk before travelling to your next stop.

Thieves watch for people putting their valuables in the trunk just before the vehicle owner(s) enter(s) a store.

K1500
January 24, 2012, 02:23 PM
They stole maybe $30 of an undistinguishable product from you and you decide to call 15 or more stores? If someone stole a couple of books from your car, would you call every pawn store in town? I understand your loss, but it does not have a serial number, and is no different than any other petty theft. I would be mad and shaken up, but I wouldn't expect every pawn shop to be on high alert for them. There is no need for an attitude by them, but there is nothing they can or should do.

Mike1234567
January 24, 2012, 02:37 PM
I'm not intending to criticise... and I'm sorry your mags were stolen. But, but other than to report the crime, I wouldn't have bothered to call the police, let alone a bunch of pawn shops. There's not enough property loss to fuss over it. Heck, wait until a building contractor abscounds with abouth $18K worth of materials, labor and shoddy work that has to be redone... happened to me a few months ago.:(

Don't worry about a couple of mags. Remove things of value from your car, lock the doors, keep things of value out of sight in your home and don't talk about them to anyone, lock your doors... yeah, I wrote that twice.:)

breacher
January 24, 2012, 02:38 PM
Hey Swordsman - which LGS gave you the lecture and treated you like crap. I'm in ABQ and would like to avoid them as well. (PM me if you don't want to broadcast it)
btw- I work for your local LE and will keep an eye out for your property.

wannabeagunsmith
January 24, 2012, 02:40 PM
Pfft, who drives Chevy's? I got a Ford, brother.

The answer is Jeep.



Ahem, on topic, how about getting a car alarm installed? should save a whole lotta trouble specially if you keep guns/parts in it.

Mike1234567
January 24, 2012, 02:57 PM
^^^ If you do install a car alarm then do three things.

1. Make darned sure it NEVER false alarms.
2. Install a very DISTINCTIVE and loud siren.
3. Tell your neigbors about it and show them that it is NOT oversensitive so they'll pay attention to it.

DoubleTapDrew
January 24, 2012, 02:59 PM
The answer is Jeep.

All the jeep (wrangler) owners I know leave their doors unlocked rather than buy a new several hundred dollar soft top whenever someone wants to see if there's anything worth stealing inside.

maskedman504
January 24, 2012, 03:14 PM
All the jeep (wrangler) owners I know leave their doors unlocked rather than buy a new several hundred dollar soft top whenever someone wants to see if there's anything worth stealing inside.


That gave me a chuckle... ;)

In all seriousness, it sucks to lose a couple of loaded mags; I learned a harder lesson when my grandfather's .38 special S&W service revolver was stolen from my Tahoe. He was the Sheriff of his county after he sold his farm. I bought an identical one, but it will never be his. :banghead: The vehicle was locked and parked in my lighted driveway- the thief broke the window and took it. Bottom line is I don't leave a gun in the truck anymore, it stays on me or in the home. Anymore I think of my CC like a wallet or phone; I sure never leave the phone or wallet in the car, so why leave something much more valuable in it?

22-rimfire
January 24, 2012, 03:16 PM
I had my pickup broken into about 10 years ago and lost about $3,000 worth of stuff including one firearm. Did I call pawn shops? No. Did I call the police? Yes. Did I report the loss to my insurance company? No.

I take responsibility for what I leave in my vehicle. The world is a crap shoot at times. After that experience, I purposely left valuable things in my vehicle at home baiting potential punk thieves. You don't want to know what I intended to do to one of them if I caught them. I was not going to make their day again... they were going to make mine.

doorman
January 24, 2012, 03:24 PM
Lessons I taught my kids, now adults.

1. The internet is PUBLIC domain.

2. Don't do or say anything that would embarrass you if your grand parents found out. Refer to lesson number 1.

3. Don't leave anything in your car that you would hate to lose.

K1500
January 24, 2012, 03:56 PM
Regarding car alarms, does ANYONE think their neighbors are going to rush out and confront a thief if they hear an alarm? The same goes for home alarms. Are the neighbors going to grab their guns and run out to confront a potential burglar at 2:00 a.m? I think not. The alarm makes it uncomfortable for the thief and wakes the owner. That is all they do.

Mike1234567
January 24, 2012, 04:26 PM
^^^ No but folks will turn outside lights on. Heck, if I saw someone breaking into a car I'd call 911 and walk outside to shine a bright flashlight on them and give them a good yell. Yes, I'm that stoopid but I'm also sick and tired of thieves thinking we're all to cowardly to stand up to them.

mo841
January 24, 2012, 05:02 PM
I had my car broke into about 4 times now. (not so good neighborhood I live in) the first time I had all of my CD's stollen and radio. The second time they couldnt get anything because I learned to leave everything out of my car and they decided to just break things including ripping my license plate off and leaving it all bent in the street. The last two times I just come out to a car that was clearly rifled through but no other damage. After the first two times I got an alarm and that vehical never was broke into after that. The last two times they broke into my new cars without alarms. I know of alot of people that have had their windows broken for nothing more than a radio and change in the counsil in my one friends car. It is not worth locking your door, better to just leave everything out of the car or in the trunk.The red light that an alarm system comes with is usually enought to detur the average kid thats just looking through cars, they will just move on to the neighbors car that doesnt have an alarm. It sucks when things get taken but it is just one of them expensive life lessons,

Bubbles
January 24, 2012, 05:27 PM
All the jeep (wrangler) owners I know leave their doors unlocked rather than buy a new several hundred dollar soft top whenever someone wants to see if there's anything worth stealing inside.
I have a friend with an MGB convertible who also did this - the thieves cut the top anyway. He thinks they did it b/c there was nothing in the car to steal.

I have a Mustang convertible and don't leave anything of value in it either. I'm not that concerned about the car itself getting stolen by joy-riders since thieves today haven't had to learn about things like manual chokes and clutch pedals.

Tygarys
January 24, 2012, 07:05 PM
Hey Swordsman - which LGS gave you the lecture and treated you like crap. I'm in ABQ and would like to avoid them as well. (PM me if you don't want to broadcast it)
btw- I work for your local LE and will keep an eye out for your property.
I'm also in the ABQ area, let us know which store that was.

Arkansas Paul
January 24, 2012, 07:10 PM
I had the opposite experience with pawn shops when our reloading gear was stolen. They were friendly and wished me good luck. A couple even said to check back with them.

Of course reloading equipment is not as common as Glock mags, so that may explain it.

DoubleTapDrew
January 24, 2012, 11:08 PM
I have a friend with an MGB convertible who also did this - the thieves cut the top anyway. He thinks they did it b/c there was nothing in the car to steal.

I have a Mustang convertible and don't leave anything of value in it either. I'm not that concerned about the car itself getting stolen by joy-riders since thieves today haven't had to learn about things like manual chokes and clutch pedals.
If someday I have the means to build myself a factory five cobra (kit car) I'll be leaving it open as well. Luckily they don't even have a soft top to cut. And if they steal the car...well, they can kill themselves (500+hp in a 2400lb car) and the insurance company can buy me a new one :)

Fishslayer
January 25, 2012, 11:19 AM
You gotta see were there coming from how many identicle glock mags are there around

True, but how many people try to sell 10mm Glock mags on their own? Might not be able to prove anything but might let you know who you're dealing with.

mo841
January 25, 2012, 11:43 AM
As far as neighbors or anyone else for that matter coming out when they hear the car alarm, it takes literally seconds to open the car, rip the radio out and run. by the time anyone got outside the criminal would most likly be gone or you would see them down the sreet running. like I said though, the little red light usually keeps them out and they go down the rest of the street shopping.

22-rimfire
January 25, 2012, 12:32 PM
Once your home or car is broken into, things are not the same anymore. You take precautions. But the fact of the matter is that there is little you can legally do short of preventative measures that almost always cost money. Life is not fair.

I leave my metal tool box on my pickup unlocked since they are so easy to open if you don't care about damaging them. Yes, there is good stuff in there.

JustinJ
January 25, 2012, 01:41 PM
I would be highly surprised if one would bother risks associated to selling a pair of stolen glock mags.

BigFatKen
January 25, 2012, 03:55 PM
Anyone reading this thread should watch the TV series "Bait Car". The LEOs leave this tricked out car with the doors wide open, sometimes not, and see who drives off.

The stories told are priceless. The one I almost believe is; BG#1 checks out bait car and removes keys. He offers $20 to a BG #2 who is a poorly dressed man to drive it around the corner as he is in a hurry (this part changes) or something. BG #2 then is caught.

BSA1
January 26, 2012, 10:20 AM
F.S.,

If I was a pawn shop owner and you called me you would have got a not very nice response also.

ring, ring

me: XYZ Pawn Shop

you; I had two gun magazines stolen from my car last night and would like for you to keep a eye out for them.

me; Why do you think they would come to my store?

you; Well they are stolen and I know a lot of stolen items are pawned.

me; Let me get this right you are accusing me of dealing in stolen property!So you think I knowly put my business, myself and my employees at risk for knowly taking stolen property!!! (really pissed by now).

The rest of the conversation is not appropriate other to say you should be very careful what you say to strangers that could be seen as calling them a thief.

bhk
January 26, 2012, 01:08 PM
We had a rash of car break-ins in an entertainment/cultural portion of a nearby large city a couple of years ago. The police recommendation was to not leave valuables in your car and to leave it UNLOCKED when visiting the area. Their outlook was nothing to steal and nothing to vandelize if the car was unlocked. This was a busy area, and I guess most of the car burgleries were quick smash and grabs with few problems related to stereo/attached accessory type thefts.

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