Teenagers and handguns


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Gizards'n'Gravy
January 24, 2012, 08:03 PM
Hello everyone, I have been wondering about this for a while now and I would like to get some opinions on this issue. So, teenagers and handguns, do you trust your son or daughter alone with a handgun?

Say for example a father worked nights, and the mother adamently refused to have anything to do with guns. Your teenager, say 14-17, was the only one there who knows guns. This teenager is absolutely reliable and trustworthy NOT do do something stupid with this handgun and is rock-solid when it comes to gun safety. Would you allow your child to have un-restricted access to his/her bedside gun while you were away?

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Telekinesis
January 24, 2012, 08:11 PM
Haha when I was 18 I had 3 handguns and 2 CCW permits, so I guess I'm a little biased... But I would say that as long as you're responsible you should be allowed to have a gun. The law doesn't always agree with that as far as minors go, but in my opinion, once someone is 18, they should be able to purchase, own, and carry any gun they like (to include NFA weapons).

As far as "protection of the castle" falling to you, I'm pretty sure your mom would have something to say about that. Most mothers I know (even those who don't like guns) are very protective of their kids and don't like the idea of them being put in harms way, which is what you are essentially telling her by saying you're the first line of defense - that you are the first one to face any danger that happens to come into the house.

Edit: I see she is your step-mom, that probably changes some things, so my last paragraph may not completely apply.

Robert
January 24, 2012, 08:13 PM
I take it on a case by case, person by person basis. In my expereince many teenagers are far too immature to drive let alone handle a firearm. Course that could be said for many adults as well. So I make my judgments based on the young man or woman at hand.

22-rimfire
January 24, 2012, 08:21 PM
I never shot a handgun until I was 21. Dad didn't own any. I would not buy a pre-18 year old a handgun for any reason.

As far as handguns in the house, I support the concept of training and trust. Betray that trust and you do it with peril. Long guns are different. I had unrestricted access to rifles from about age 12 on, but we lived in the country and you could safely shoot in the back yard. It was mostly a money thing... we had to buy our own ammo.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
January 24, 2012, 08:42 PM
I never shot a handgun until I was 21. Dad didn't own any. I would not buy a pre-18 year old a handgun for any reason.

All of my kids were shooting regularly at the ripe old age of 5. Handguns, rifles, shotguns, muzzle loaders, you name it. The traditional 8th birthday present for every one of my kids (5) has been the firearm of their choice. 2 of the boys picked handguns, the other 3 picked rifles. The 2 that picked handguns primarily hunt with handguns. They are also very proficient bow hunters as well. I personally believe that any child can be very responsible as long as they were taught that responsibility at a young age. As soon as mine were walking, they were learning how to shoot and shoot safely. They NEVER laid hands on ANY guns (even their own) without my express permission and supervision or their mothers. At 16-17, yep I would have complete faith in them and did have. I would also have expected them to act with complete confidence had someone broke into the home with one of them there. They all knew exactly where the loaded handguns were (every room, hidden).

4 of them are grown now with kids of their own and I have a "surprise" one to raise now. Another 8th BDay present coming Feb 27th. She already got one for her Xmas but I guess I have to spoil the little princess :rolleyes: She loves her little Pink TC hotshot so much. But now she wants to experiment more with her own handgun. Probably getting another Sig P238 like her moms except it will "HAVE" to be the rainbow one :rolleyes: (Damn kids)

Shadow 7D
January 24, 2012, 08:42 PM
depends on the kid
I had my very own personal gun at the age of 17
issued to me by Uncle Sam
cared for and fired by yours truly

REALLY depends on the kid
like others have mentioned, it's responsibility, and that tends to come from maturity.

3KillerBs
January 24, 2012, 08:47 PM
For several years I've felt better about my now-18yo daughter being home alone (or in charge of her younger brothers), knowing that she had access to the gun storage where she could, if need be, protect herself with any of our handguns that we might not have with us and her own .22 revolver.

Though not old enough to be a certified, NRA range officer she has taken the training course -- in conjunction with the youth air rifle team she used to shoot on.

Swichblade
January 24, 2012, 08:58 PM
I started shooting handguns at fifteen years old. I am now seventeen, and I just received my first handgun for Christmas . When I tell some people I shoot handguns, I sometimes get people who act like I am too young to handle a handgun, so I explain to them that I can safely operate a pistol.

Gizards'n'Gravy
January 24, 2012, 09:00 PM
Telekinesis, my mother carries a gun and think it is a great idea(not the idea of me being in danger). She would MUCH rather me be the one with a gun, and know that I am safe and competent, than have to worry that my safety would be left in the hands of my step-mom, who would likely get us both killed if there was ever a hostile situation in the home and it was left to her to use a firearm...it was actually her idea to uh, get herself a gun so I could use it.

22-rimfire, why would you not let a pre-18 year old have a handgun? If they show to be exceptionally safe and responsible, abd the situation called for it, then why not? they are no more dangerous than rifles or shotguns.

Leathermarshmallow
January 24, 2012, 09:04 PM
My dad bought me a Ruger Single Six when I was 14 years old. He knew he could trust me to be safe with it or any firearm. My oldest two children were raised with guns in the house and were taught at a young age to respect them and how to act with them. We had guns all over the house. Then I re-married. Her children had never been around firearms and were extremely curious. I went right out and bought a safe. I kept all of my firearms unloaded and locked up. As time has passed, and I have had the opportunity to teach them the way of the gun, I have gone back to having some available for emergency use. In fact, my oldest step son has purchased two rifles and a pistol of his own.

Gizards'n'Gravy
January 24, 2012, 09:14 PM
Swichblade I know exactly what you mean, I tend not to tell anyone but close friends that I have guns at all, but occasionally, if I tell an adult they tend to flip out maybe 40% of the time. I have been around men and women that have never even fired a weapon,much less have experience in being safe with one. Yet it never fails, they assume that because they are older that they are special and magicly know everything about how to operate a firearm safely. My dad's shooting buddies are one thing,they have experience and if they tell me something, I listen. My Algebra teacher who is honestly to old to be playing Halo is another...

Noah
January 24, 2012, 09:19 PM
I am 16, and my twin brother and I are the prime defenders of the household when our Dad is not home, which is often. We have earned the privilege (years of responsible use of .22s and 12 gauge with our Dad, years of responsible use of an air rifle or four before that) to keep "our" long guns in our room. Only ever used with supervision and permission, but we have a key due to the fact that we sleep downstairs near the back door, while he and his guns are upstairs... still think that's a bad idea? My cousin was raped and almost kidnapped when she was sleeping in the basement while her parents were home, upstairs. Not gonna be a victim!! I would give my life for my mom and little sister before that happened... We also know perfectly well how to access and use the handguns and shotgun in our parents' room.

We don't "have" any handguns, although I'd accept any as a gift haha, and I might "get" one eventually, shoot it a lot and keep it for SD, leave it at home when I leave, and pick it up at my 21st Birthday party... But probably not.

I feel that either of us have the mindset, skillset,and toolset to defend or home if we ever had to. My parents and myself are very happy with that when my Dad is away during the day, or we are home alone.

That said, I don't even really know any other teens that are into guns, but I wouldn't trust 95% of the other ones I have met with an airsoft gun. The only one I know is a 12 year old Boy Scout that we taught to shoot, and shoot with, every few weeks.

That said, we NEED to get my mother competent on the various firearms in the house.

buck460XVR
January 24, 2012, 09:21 PM
So, back to my question. What are your opinions on kids my age having handguns? Do you think it is a bad idea?


Federal law generally prohibits the possession of handguns by persons under the age of 18. So does my State law. That said, both my sons started to shoot my handguns at a young age, with my supervision. They could not open carry them or hunt with them until they were 18, at which time they both received one of their choice from my collection. This was in addition to matching Buckmarks with consecutive serial numbers. My sons were/are responsible and safety conscientious. Not all 18 year olds are. Not only does a parent need to know the maturity level of their child before giving them a handgun, they also need to know the law in their jurisdiction, and at least imply that they obey said laws.........;)

mljdeckard
January 24, 2012, 09:25 PM
My oldest (step) son is 13, and honestly, he's not very focused, and shows little inclination to learn how to shoot. I don't think I will be encouraging him to be using guns extensively by himself any time soon. My next one however, who is ten, is very sharp and intuitive, and I will be mentoring him with high expectations.

22-rimfire
January 24, 2012, 09:25 PM
22-rimfire, why would you not let a pre-18 year old have a handgun? If they show to be exceptionally safe and responsible, abd the situation called for it, then why not? they are no more dangerous than rifles or shotguns.

You will notice I said I would not buy a handgun for them. That doesn't mean that I would not allow a 12 year old to shoot my handguns. It is something that I would have to judge on a case by case basis, but generally speaking I would provide rifles and shotguns but not handguns prior to age 18.

There are a lot of what if's. But I strongly favor kids learning to shoot as soon as they are big enough to handle the firearm safely. So my absolute sounding statement is probably a little strong.

"Dangerous" is relative. It all would depend on the kid. If they domonstrate that they are safe and responsible, I would probably give them a lot of rope. I would ask others their impressions (say at the range) rather than just judging when they are around me. In your case, I would favor what you are doing at home, but I would probably provide you with a shotgun to do it with rather than a handgun.

The problem is often not the son or daughter, it is their friends who might be inside the house.

Noah
January 24, 2012, 09:39 PM
but generally speaking I would provide rifles and shotguns but not handguns prior to age 18.

The problem is often not the son or daughter, it is their friends who might be inside the house.


I agree with both statements quite a bit. Shotguns and rifles have more clear cut sporting purposes, and are safer to use. (muzzle control, I feel) Also the parent can just keep the keys or whatever until they are 18, and then the teen can just take "their" guns with them.

On the second, I am VERY glad that my 11 year old brother is mostly responsible and rather disinterested in the family's guns for now. I don't have to worry about him finding the keys and showing off the guns to his friends. Otherwise that would be a *very* big concern. I'm sure you and the gun control crowd are well aware of how that often turns out.

The one aforementioned friend of both of us looks up to my twin brother and I, and respects every thing we say to him, and is very responsible and safe. He treats everything we do as the coolest thing ever and puts a lot of value in our opinion of him, so I don't ever have to worry about him doing something dumb while he's around. He hangs on to every bit of gun safety that we tell him.

Gizards'n'Gravy
January 24, 2012, 10:04 PM
I absolutely agree 22-rimfire, that it would be a bad idea for there to be an unsecured firearm in the house while all of my friends are over. Thats why when they are at my house, the gun goes to a "safe" place.I have 1 friend that I trust enough to go shooting with (and his dad shoots with my dad) who occassionally get to peek in the safe, as long as dad permits it of course. The rest of my friends have zero access to our firearms, they don't even get to look.

My father and I were teaching his friend and son (who both had never used a gun) about guns at our little range one day. After the regular first timer safety lecture, how to handle, and all that good stuff, everything was going great. Everyone was having a blast and after graduating from .22 pistols, the man
s son wanted to shoot the 9mm. I was behind him on his left and my dad was behind him on his right, talking him through.

He fired a few rounds and then stopped, said he didn't want to shoot it anymore. My dad told him to lower the gun and use the decocker to lower the hammer, and make sure he kept his finger off the trigger. Now keep in mind we showed him twice how to use the decocker and where it was, so you can imagine my suprise when he turned the gun to the left and started to bring it up to his face where he could see it. He was saying "that's this thing ri..." right about the time he pointed the muzzle right at my face, hammer back, finger on the trigger.

I jumped away about as fast as a human possibly can, and my dad had the gun re-directed in about a nano-second. Needless to say I have not ever brought him to the range again. I don't blame him really though, we should have known better than to let him try out a fulll size pistol on the first day. But, he had been shooting .22 pistols for several hours with great results. I take firearm safely very serious :)

22-rimfire
January 24, 2012, 10:18 PM
I think most of us have had experiences we would rather not put down in writing for the world to read. It sounds like you and your Dad are doing things right.

gc70
January 24, 2012, 10:21 PM
What are your opinions on kids my age having handguns?

Absent laws to the contrary, it depends on the maturity and responsibility of the individual rather than calendar age.

My father and I were teaching his friend and son (who both had never used a gun) about guns at our little range one day.

Again, maturity and responsibility are more important than age. My brother-in-law pulled the same stunt on me ... and he is retired.

spazzymcgee
January 24, 2012, 10:26 PM
I strongly believe that responsible minors should be permitted firearms. I'm 15 years old, and have already bought and sold a Romanian WASR, own a Bersa thunder 9, A Del-Ton AR, numerous other firearms, and have never had any kind of firearm related incident, for the ten years that I've been shooting. I also know more gun stuff than most Adults I know. My mother and Stepfather actually brag about it.

Owen Sparks
January 24, 2012, 10:30 PM
If you are old enough (and responsible enough) to be trusted with a car you should be responsible enough to be trusted with a gun.

Hunter125
January 24, 2012, 10:34 PM
I think that totally depends on the kid's temperament and maturity level. I have known teenagers that I wouldn't trust as far as I could throw them, and have also known a few that are the kind of people you want by your side when it hits the fan.

roadliner
January 24, 2012, 10:48 PM
I didn't shoot a handgun until I was around 18. I've known young kids who could handle the responsibilities that come with shooting or just being around handguns. I also know a few that after 50 years should never touch a gun. Some people never mature.

Noah
January 24, 2012, 10:50 PM
If you are old enough (and responsible enough) to be trusted with a car you should be responsible enough to be trusted with a gun.

Trouble is, you are most likely to have a car accident at age 16.

A lot (if not most) of gun violence is commited by "underage" people. Laws only ever stop those who abide by them in the first place.

I am 16, I don't think we should be allowed to carry handguns.
I think those 13 and over should be able to buy a long gun with a parent cosigning, and the gun made over to them at 18.

However, I think someone 18 and up with ZERO misdemeanors should be able to buy and CC a handgun. With a few small misdemeanors, especially, DUI and stuff, it should be 21. Sort of a rough gauge of responsibility.

M2 Carbine
January 24, 2012, 11:19 PM
depends on the kid
I say it depends more on the parent.

Some parents are so stupid it make me think there should be a mandatory IQ test before being allowed to have kids (or vote).:rolleyes:


But yes it does depend on the kid. I've taught young kids that were as responsible with guns as any adult.


And personally, I go back to the fact that the Marine Corps trusted me with a M1 Garand when I was 17.

mo841
January 24, 2012, 11:40 PM
the maturity level of the person plays a big part. When I was that age, I would not trust 90% of my buddies with any gun because they had that look at me I'm a gangster mantality to them. I believe alot of that is due to their families not being gun families so they had no access to guns or were taught proper handleing of them. it really comes down to a person to person basis.

22-rimfire
January 24, 2012, 11:42 PM
And personally, I go back to the fact that the Marine Corps trusted me with a M1 Garand when I was 17.

They sure did. But they don't trust you to keep a firearm on base unless it is locked up in the armory.

Harrod
January 25, 2012, 12:11 AM
I'm afraid i would have to be in the same boat of not buying an underage a handgun only because the law states it. My kids are currently 9 and 6mo, I told my 9yo that I would take her out one day and let her shoot. The wife isn't terribly happy about that since she hates guns, but is fine with the kids understanding all things about the guns and safety first.

Now, I will let them fire any gun I have handgun or long. I think that if you know how to handle and fire a gun and have all the safety down, than you are fine with both. If either of them want a gun I would drop whatever on any long gun they want if they are under age. Only because I like to follow the law, its easier that way. Don't get me wrong, I don't agree with it but not agreeing with it doesn't keep the cuffs off you if you get caught.

I love to shoot and hunt, I want my kids to grow up the same way and be as safe as possible. I also want to teach them to respect their elders and the law. So I have to follow the laws if I want them to truly understand, even if I don't completely agree with them.

Ridgerunner665
January 25, 2012, 12:29 AM
I started my first son on 22 rifles very young (5), moved him up to 22 handguns at 12...let him keep his own (a Bersa 45 UC) in his room starting at 16...

He turned out OK

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/Ridgerunner665/0913110937-1-1.jpg

I gave him my Baer stainless Stinger when he graduated boot camp
http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/Ridgerunner665/101_0108.jpg

It does somewhat depend on the kid though...I'm lucky in that he is one of those extremely intelligent individuals and was always willing to listen and learn.

I also believe my young one is gonna be OK too...he's almost 5 now, he had just turned 4 in this pic.
http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/Ridgerunner665/101_0130.jpg

22-rimfire
January 25, 2012, 12:33 AM
Looks good Ridgerunner! I love to see our youth taking a responsible interest in firearms and shooting. It all starts with the parents, but probably mostly Dad.

Serenity
January 25, 2012, 12:41 AM
I am glad that I "got into" guns when my son was 14. I have a couple of years to make sure he is as knowledgeable and respectful as possible, before he flies the nest.

MECHAGODZILLA II
January 25, 2012, 01:01 AM
I'd rather kids handle weaponry under adult guidance but have free access to the same for emergencies. That keeps the 'forbidden fruit'-related mindset from
happening, too.

Noah
January 25, 2012, 10:36 AM
I'd rather kids handle weaponry under adult guidance but have free access to the same for emergencies. That keeps the 'forbidden fruit'-related mindset from
happening, too.


That is how we have it set up in my family. We have had zero issues in years of firearms ownership. The friends we don't trust to be safe/knowledgeable and aren't too interested in guns never see the inside of the safe, and know nothing about the loaded weapons stored elsewhere. The ones we do trust and who are interested look forward to shooting with us every time they come over.

My parents would be perfectly Ok with me keeping a handgun in my room, but, you see, I already have 9 long guns in my room, I am buying my friend's bass guitar, I have a car and driver's ed to pay for, and I had multiple vacations I wanted to take this summer. Add the iffy legality of a minor "having" a handgun, whether it is "Dad's" and he has the keys, and here's no reason. If Ohio was a state where you could "posses" a private transaction handgun at 18, and OC if you really wanted to, I would be more interested.

For now, I just carry a cell phone and 3" folder. I wish I could carry a gun, and of course I feel that "I" (of course not other teens cuz I am much better than them :neener: But really it seems like most of us gun-familiar teens seem to be decent people) am responsible enough to do so, but laws are laws. And that S&W or Glock is like 2 months pay after bills. And my Dad ain't exactly rich. But tax returns are coming soon...

Now if the guy with a hundred guns who gave us a Mosin for free offers me one of his Kimbers next time we shoot with him, I might feel a bit differently :neener:


EDIT: That 3rd Picture is adorable, I can see some Gun Control Liberal having a heart attack at that haha. It reminds me of my 2 year old cousin who can drive my grandfather's 1950s Ford tractor. He is totally obsessed with farm equipment.

Dejavu
January 25, 2012, 10:45 AM
Of course it depends on the person, but as far as the question of being 17... I was in the Marine Corps when I was seventeen. Age itself has not much to do with it.

Also, I want to thank that young man in the dress blues for standing his watch for his country. Semper Fi.

Loosedhorse
January 25, 2012, 11:02 AM
do you trust your son or daughter alone with a handgun?Do you trust him alone with the car keys? With enough cash to get into trouble?

I think there is a serious argument to be made that if your child is prone to suicidal thought or criminal behavior, then the firearms (in the first case) or the child (in the second) should be out of the house.

Otherwise: train them, respect them, and do what seems right to you.

Be aware that some states (like mine) severely limit the legality of a non-hunting, non-licensed minor's unsupervised access to firearms.

Stophel
January 25, 2012, 11:09 AM
I remember when I was in high school, I guess I was about 17, I had been out shooting .22 pistols with a friend of mine, and we were driving around, and I needed to stop at the bank to cash my meager check from working at the grocery store. I ALMOST walked in with a pistol on my hip! :D I stopped to take it off before I went in :D

TwoWheelFiend
January 25, 2012, 12:09 PM
Here is a really good article by the great Massad Ayoob about kids and guns. Give it a read.
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob68.html
Heres a good quote from it:
"Each family has to make their own decision, and it has to be made specifically for each child, with a ruthlessly honest appraisal of the child’s emotional stability, maturity, and ability. My father, and his father before him, were gunfight survivors before I was born. I grew up with firearms. By the age of nine, I had a .22 rifle, a shotgun, and a Winchester 94 deer rifle hanging on a rack in my bedroom. At the age of 12, I had a loaded Colt .45 automatic in the desk drawer in that same bedroom."


IMO It all depends on the person. When it comes to guns, training and responsibility I had the best father in the world. He was teaching me to shoot handguns when i was 7 or 8. I got my first handgun ( Single Six ) when i was 9. I had access to any handgun in the household when i was 13. My father had all the trust in the world in my because he knew he could. He worked nights and being the oldest son Like the OP said i was responsible to guard the home at night, mom was not a shooter.

22-rimfire
January 25, 2012, 12:23 PM
Be aware that some states (like mine) severely limit the legality of a non-hunting, non-licensed minor's unsupervised access to firearms.

I believe in MA you have to have your firearms essentially locked up like Great Britian? Good for the safe business....

smalls
January 25, 2012, 12:37 PM
Harrod, you make it sound like it's illegal to buy a handgun and allow any underage person to shoot it at all.

Zoogster
January 25, 2012, 12:50 PM
I think that handguns are a big temptation for teens and parents should be very cautiously of letting teens have access to them.


The temptation to pocket a handgun and go someplace with it is going to be there.

Access to a long gun and not a handgun still requires a responsible person, but it reduces the temptation to take it someplace.


I would let them shoot it at the range, and keep it from being the forbidden fruit, but access to a handgun is a very risky thing.
It only takes taking it someplace its not supposed to be one time, letting a friend that is immature hold it or check it out, or otherwise getting into trouble with it to put both the kid and parent in some trouble.
That does not even require malicious intent.


A child with a parent that works odd hours can be even worse. That means they could take it out and get away with it and bring it back and nobody would know, on as regular a basis as they wanted. Until caught or they do something stupid.






M2 Carbine said: And personally, I go back to the fact that the Marine Corps trusted me with a M1 Garand when I was 17.

22-rimfire said: But they don't trust you to keep a firearm on base unless it is locked up in the armory.


That is exactly correct. The military trusts its soldiers very little, especially in modern times.
Personal and issued weapons are rarely allowed in the soldier's possession on a base or outside of a war zone.
In fact they are so restrictive of soldiers today that many cannot even possess knives in the barracks. Or they are limited to certain types of knives, specifically sizes or types not seen as posing any real risk of death if used offensively.


The military has also issued mandatory registration orders of all personal owned weapons, even those stored off base, in recent years.
The military does not even trust soldiers to own weapons they don't know about off base.
The military is not in favor of firearm freedoms. They want absolute control over the lives of their soldiers, and ready access and freedom with firearms beyond what is necessary is discouraged.
The military is a dictatorship, and anything that gives individuals control or potential power over themselves or other members of the military outside of the designed hierarchy are obviously seen as a potential threat. Power must be tightly controlled, and this extends to keeping firearms in an armory except and unless needed, and attempts to keep tabs on all possible arms members of the military are likely to have access to (including personal owned weapons off base.)

CelticArmory
January 25, 2012, 01:17 PM
Depends on the teen. One of my step sons who is 14 I would trust implicitly. In fact he has his own .22 rifle that used to hang in a rack in his bedroom, until his older brother moved in. His older brother who is 16 I wouldn't trust with a BB gun. It's all based on behavior.

razorback2003
January 25, 2012, 01:32 PM
I don't see a problem if it is legal in Louisiana. I had a handgun given to me when I was 18 for protection. I started carrying it in the woods and when I traveled.

dannyr3_8
January 25, 2012, 06:44 PM
I take it on a case by case, person by person basis. In my expereince many teenagers are far too immature to drive let alone handle a firearm. Course that could be said for many adults as well. So I make my judgments based on the young man or woman at hand.
you said it all it all depends on the individual

USAF_Vet
January 25, 2012, 07:55 PM
I figure if my step son can handle my 9mm at his age, as long as he progresses nicely, he'll get his own handgun at 16 or so.

hermannr
January 25, 2012, 10:56 PM
all 5 of our daughters had safety training and .22 rifle experience by age 8 (some were as young as 5 when they began)

All 5 had the handgun down pat by age 12, and every one of them liked their mother's High Standard Trophy to anything I had, but every one shot every weapon we had by 12. My guns (many) were never locked up, and the girls knew, if you want to go shoot, ask first. Never had a problem. No mystery, no problems.

Think about the girl that was 17 in TX a couple moths ago that sent some burglers packing by using her fathers pistol. That is what I expected from my girls, and they knew it.

I have a 12 year old granddaughter I would trust with any of my firearms, rifles, pistols or shotguns,,,and I have a 45 year old SIL I wouldn't trust with any of them (too careless)

splithoof
January 26, 2012, 02:51 AM
Ridgerunner, that is awesome! Congrats on having one of America's very best as your own son. Was that pic taken on the "island"?

Ridgerunner665
January 26, 2012, 08:37 PM
The top pic of him in his blues was taken the Monday after he got back from Parris Island...his recruiter wanted to show him off at the high school (thats the school in the background)

The one below it was taken within 5 minutes of walking through the front door upon our return from Parris Island.

I have a bunch from Parris Island too...see below...he is now in Camp Pendleton, almost done with AAV crewman training...then he'll be in Camp Lejune (at least for a while...he has applied to see if he can survive the cut for Recon...he'll go back to Camp Pendleton for that)

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/Ridgerunner665/298304_282151335144257_100000481775110_1174610_1877387709_n.jpg
http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/Ridgerunner665/09081113091.jpg

Dnaltrop
January 26, 2012, 08:50 PM
No, I was never trusted with anything larger than a BB gun alone, even though I was the "good" kid.

This led to my learning to pick padlocks, strip and clean firearms rapidly enough to be done before people returned home, and my being the safest and most knowledgeable of my small circle of friends. (two now ex- friends who've passed rounds near my abdomen after clearing a weapon by pulling the slide, THEN dropping the magazine, THEN arguing with my telling them it's now loaded by pointing the gun near me and pulling the trigger)

I'm big on demystification, My girls don't register my handguns as being any more noticeable than a pocket knife. My eldest is mature enough (and chomping at the bit) to have earned her first .22 pistol for her 10th. ( it will of course be legally mine until she's of age)

sugarmaker
January 27, 2012, 02:15 PM
Depends on the kid. I had free access to all guns in the house at age 12 and shot regularly "out back". We were 2 miles from the nearest neighbor. At my current house, where we're 5oo feet from several houses in numerous directions, i don't think this would be a good idea.

porchdog
January 27, 2012, 05:39 PM
My sons were around guns their entire childhood. One likes to hunt and shoot as an adult and one seems to care less about it. I have 2 grandsons now who have their own guns and shoot and hunt with supervision. Neither my sons or grandsons shoot as much as I did when I was growing up. I think it is a changing of the times. When I was 12-15 years old it would be a common sight to see me with either a rifle or shotgun. Now it someone that age walked through town the National Guard would be called out. I walked through residential neighboorhoods to get to where I was going to hunt. No one sounded the alarm.

biohazurd
January 28, 2012, 01:45 PM
as long as my child had proved that they are responsible and show fantastic gun safety i would say yes. What if me or my wife were not home at the time and someone tried to harm my child? should i expect them to just willingly be a victim? Hell no.

xfyrfiter
January 28, 2012, 04:08 PM
My boys were both schooled thoroughly in the safety aspect of guns, and were allowed to shoot with supervision only, as neither was responsible enough to be on their own till grown. I was shooting at 5 yo, and deer hunting on my own at 9 yo, so it definetly depends on the youngster.

GEM
January 29, 2012, 12:15 PM
"Each family has to make their own decision, and it has to be made specifically for each child, with a ruthlessly honest appraisal of the child’s emotional stability, maturity, and ability.

Mas has it right. To switch gears from a gun guy to my profession, it is astonishing how many parents are completely unaware of the depth of problems a child has or how rapidly their emotional state can change. Also, the influence of friends and peers is supremely powerful in teenagers and can have quick and deleterious influences.

While I certainly understand the need for SD, I say be very careful. I also worry that those who are most confident that they run the house in a strict patriachial fashion and are always obeyed - may be particularly vulnerable to rebellion or other problems. Their own self-image blocks insight as Mas said is needed.

Tough call.

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