What's This?


PDA






Confederate
February 9, 2012, 12:55 AM
I've seen it on a number of modern revolvers, though not Ruger. My old S&W 686 doesn't have it, but a newer model I have does.

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh198/jriler/AWhatThis.jpg

.
.

If you enjoyed reading about "What's This?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
mnrivrat
February 9, 2012, 02:20 AM
The raised area you refer to is the cylinder stop. It keeps the cylinder from moving rearward when it is out of the frame. ( as in during ejection of the empty brass)

MachIVshooter
February 9, 2012, 02:49 AM
^^^^^^^^^

What he said. S&W cylinders are retained by the crane and frame. When the crane is removed from the gun, they slide right off.

MrBorland
February 9, 2012, 03:56 AM
The raised area you refer to is the cylinder stop. It keeps the cylinder from moving rearward when it is out of the frame. ( as in during ejection of the empty brass)

Correct, but technically, it's called the frame lug. The cylinder stop is the doohickie that keeps the cylinder from rotating.

My old S&W 686 doesn't have it, but a newer model I have does

Older Smiths use a smaller tab that's pressed into the frame. AFAIK, the newer lugs are part of the frame, and non-replaceable. You don't want to damage it. :cuss:

Oro
February 9, 2012, 04:46 AM
AFAIK, the newer lugs are part of the frame, and non-replaceable.

The change was made in 1997 I believe. The prior method of pressing a cylindrical lug into the frame and then machining it to blend into the frame window was stopped, and cnc'ing this much larger piece out of the frame was instituted.

Jim K
February 9, 2012, 06:49 PM
Deleted

Confederate
February 9, 2012, 09:04 PM
Thanks, all, and especially Oro. I'm familiar with the tabs, but didn't know why Smith changed the entire side of the gun. I wonder if it was function or fashion?

.

Thaddeus Jones
February 9, 2012, 09:27 PM
It was done to cut costs. Not to improve the revolver. Just like all the other "innovations". :rolleyes: ;)

9mmepiphany
February 9, 2012, 10:06 PM
I wonder if it was function or fashion?
Cost while retaining function.

It is easier and more accurate to machine it as part of the frame than to drill a hole, press in a separate piece and than hand fit that piece to the cylinder

MachIVshooter
February 10, 2012, 02:35 AM
Cost while retaining function.

It is easier and more accurate to machine it as part of the frame than to drill a hole, press in a separate piece and than hand fit that piece to the cylinder

Spot-on.

One thing we seem to sometimes not think about.......

We all like to look at older guns that were put together with lots of intricately machined parts, and we see this as quality. But........

Modern technology allows many things to be done in ways that are not only simpler and more cost effective, but also stronger and more precise.

Forging processes today can turn out a blank that very closely resembles the finished product, versus the less-precise methods of yesteryear that required tremendous amounts of milling on the rough-forged piece.

If you enjoyed reading about "What's This?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!