Blood lead levels


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ggood
February 16, 2012, 07:49 PM
Have shot many thousands of rds the last few months in indoor range and also use tumbler to clean cases indoors.Got blood test results as 62 or 64 and wondering if I left lead trails in my car and home.Always washed my hands but not clothes and shoes. I am pretty upset by results of my stupidity as Ive been shooting 35 years.Now have to get my house checked for lead. What made me get tested was thread I read here on tumblers which I did not think about before. Can anyone make me feel better?

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1KPerDay
February 16, 2012, 07:57 PM
Let us know what you find out about your house.

I suppose there's no way of knowing what your lead levels were BEFORE you started shooting indoors? Or have you been tumbling/shooting indoors for many years?

Start taking 1000 or 2000 mg of vitamin C per day, and don't shoot or handle lead for a month if you can help it. See what happens.

ggood
February 16, 2012, 08:07 PM
Tumbling for years shooting heavily indoors about 6 months-Thanks for info

1KPerDay
February 16, 2012, 08:12 PM
Is it a public range? have you been shooting lead or plated rounds?

I need to get my blood tested as well.

Rule3
February 16, 2012, 08:19 PM
Primary source of exposure is inhalation most probably from the indoor shooting. Does your tumbler have a solid cover or one with slots? If it is slotted, tape it over with duct tape. Lots of lead in the primers. Change your media often.

You do not absorb much lead through your skin, so washing your hands before eating, smoking etc will solve that.

Best thing is to find a outside range, stop shooting for a while and see a Doctor.
Lead accumulates and is hard to remove from the body.

ggood
February 16, 2012, 08:30 PM
Thanks,will do. DR says see him in 3 months for another test and stay away from lead for that much time. Tumbler is closed .I must open and dump contents into strainer and shake. Thats no good. Dust must go in my lungs and everywhere else

ggood
February 16, 2012, 08:48 PM
Is it a public range? have you been shooting lead or plated rounds?

I need to get my blood tested as well.
To answer 1KPerDays question-Range is operated by gun shop anyone can go as long as they pay. Mostly shoot lead

gacajun
February 16, 2012, 08:49 PM
Make sure you dump the tumbler contents when you are outside and be upwind if the wind is blowing. Wear gloves...and have a mask on.

ggood
February 16, 2012, 08:58 PM
Make sure you dump the tumbler contents when you are outside and be upwind if the wind is blowing. Wear gloves...and have a mask on.
For the last 2 weeks I bought 1/2 face respitator special rated for lead and wore it to range . Also use gloves everytime I can. Thanks for info only I am a few years too late. I will take the advice for future and like I originally said I saw it here first and thats what reminded me of the risks as I once did know them.

walt629
February 16, 2012, 09:00 PM
Okay. Let me premise this with "I know squat about reloading" but I do know a lot about containing air born particulates.

I got to ask a couple of things.

Where do you do your tumbling and what are you tumbling? If you're reloading set up is in the basement or the garage, getting rid of the air born particulates is easy. Go to your local big box hardware store and pick up an inexpensive kitchen out door venting range hood. Mount it over the work bench where your tumbler is. Get your self some lexan and attach it to the side lip of the hood on both the right and left side of the hood so that the lexan bottom edge is sitting on the bench and top edge is connected to the hood. Run a flex hose to the outside wall where you have already punched a hole and mounted a through the wall dryer vent. Or connect the hood to a shop vac that uses a HEPA filter to filter the exhaust air.

You might also consider a wet tumbler. More expensive and not widely used in reloading I think, but you can pick up a small bench top wet tumbler from a hobby machine shop equipment supplier. Tumbling your brass wet will trap the dust that comes off it. Or you can get the closed dry type that has a lid to cover it and have a shop vac ready when you go to dump the tumbler.

What are the numbers you're giving us? I found this article you might want to read from the CDC http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20050526/cdc-dangerous-blood-lead-levels-down. It pertains mainly to children but it brings up the home environment. How old is your home? What kind of paint are you exposed to?

Some time ago I changed over to totally enclosed ammunition for use on the indoor range because of the lead issues. Shooting accurately with a dust mask on is kind of weird but you might want to consider it for the near future.

Best of luck and I hope the DR. gives you some good news.

ranger335v
February 16, 2012, 09:17 PM
I sure don't KNOW how you got the lead up but I seriously doubt it was from tumbling, there is precious little lead in primers and only trace amounts remain in the case after firing so there simply isn't much to get into the tumbler media. And, considering all the gov. reg.s for ventalating indoor ranges it's unlikely shooting did it either.

I suspect your elevated lead comes from another source.

chhodge69
February 16, 2012, 09:23 PM
I always empty my tumbler outside and wear a dust mask. I don't wear gloves but I am maniacal about NOT touching my face and washing my hands after any time I handle any ammo or component.

ggood
February 16, 2012, 09:38 PM
Okay. Let me premise this with "I know squat about reloading" but I do know a lot about containing air born particulates.

I got to ask a couple of things.

Where do you do your tumbling and what are you tumbling? If you're reloading set up is in the basement or the garage, getting rid of the air born particulates is easy. Go to your local big box hardware store and pick up an inexpensive kitchen out door venting range hood. Mount it over the work bench where your tumbler is. Get your self some lexan and attach it to the side lip of the hood on both the right and left side of the hood so that the lexan bottom edge is sitting on the bench and top edge is connected to the hood. Run a flex hose to the outside wall where you have already punched a hole and mounted a through the wall dryer vent. Or connect the hood to a shop vac that uses a HEPA filter to filter the exhaust air.

You might also consider a wet tumbler. More expensive and not widely used in reloading I think, but you can pick up a small bench top wet tumbler from a hobby machine shop equipment supplier. Tumbling your brass wet will trap the dust that comes off it. Or you can get the closed dry type that has a lid to cover it and have a shop vac ready when you go to dump the tumbler.

What are the numbers you're giving us? I found this article you might want to read from the CDC http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20050526/cdc-dangerous-blood-lead-levels-down. It pertains mainly to children but it brings up the home environment. How old is your home? What kind of paint are you exposed to?

Some time ago I changed over to totally enclosed ammunition for use on the indoor range because of the lead issues. Shooting accurately with a dust mask on is kind of weird but you might want to consider it for the near future.

Best of luck and I hope the DR. gives you some good news.
thanks,you seem to be very handy .I cant put a nail into a board without bending it but I can shoot if the lead doesn't get me. I read that article and found it interesting as they said vitamin c and calcium were helpful, vitamin c was mentioned by .another member1KPerDay.All I can say is thanks for your help and being a new member to the forum I do appreciate all the time members put into trying to help another member.

gahunter12
February 16, 2012, 10:38 PM
This is the main reason I have not switched to lead. It's worth the extra $40 to keep my kids safe. When I tumble I use dryer sheets and lay a dry rag then a wet rag over my tumbler. I have a hampster cage fan that sets at my shop door while tumbling if I'm in there with it. Is there a way to check lead levels in your reloading area?

SHR970
February 16, 2012, 10:45 PM
Deleted

TexasShooter59
February 16, 2012, 10:50 PM
This and allergies is why I went straight to the stainless steel media (wet) tumbling when I began reloading a little over a year ago.

My blood tested at 2 a couple of months ago; it was the first lead test for me. Did it out of curiosity.

TexasShooter59
February 16, 2012, 10:52 PM
And I try to take a calcium tablet a while before going to the range.

oldreloader
February 16, 2012, 11:28 PM
I sure don't KNOW how you got the lead up but I seriously doubt it was from tumbling, there is precious little lead in primers and only trace amounts remain in the case after firing so there simply isn't much to get into the tumbler media. And, considering all the gov. reg.s for ventalating indoor ranges it's unlikely shooting did it either.

I suspect your elevated lead comes from another source.
I'm with ranger on this issue.

jcwit
February 16, 2012, 11:48 PM
And, considering all the gov. reg.s for ventalating indoor ranges it's unlikely shooting did it either.

What gov. regs for ventalating indoor ranges?

SlamFire1
February 16, 2012, 11:52 PM
I am beginning to think, based on ancedotal evidence like yours, that indoor ranges are toxic lead dumps. More and more people report high lead content in their blood after shooting in indoor ranges.

This article is interesting.

RISKS OF LEAD POISONING IN FIREARMS INSTRUCTORS AND THEIR STUDENTS
by Anthony M. Gregory, Copyright 1990 by THE ASLET JOURNAL, March/April 1990 Volume 4 Issue 2

Go here to read it http://www.utexas.edu/safety/ehs/msds/lead.html

I called the EPA lead hot line, looking for lead numbers. I wanted to know how much lead was in the air above lead casting pots, the lead mg/m3 in air from primers at a shooting range. Did not get that, instead they sent me this, which does not have measured data, etc.

Thank you for contacting the National Lead Information Center concerning lead safety concerns and safety measures related to firing ranges.

Virtually all ranges mandate both ear and eye protection. Yet very few instructors or ranges require any precautions against lead poisoning, which would indicate that it is not perceived as a serious threat. If you are shooting cast lead bullets, part of this lead is in the form of microscopic particles sheared from the bullet as it passes down the barrel. Lead is also vaporized from the base of cast and partially jacketed bullets by the hot gases of the burning gunpowder. Down range, the bullet impacting on the armor plate emits a spray of fine lead particles. More importantly, the chemical commonly used in most primers is lead styphnate. Detonating the primer discharges a cloud of molecular lead compounds. So the air in a shooting range-even an extremely well ventilated range-tends to contain a lot of lead, both as a dust and a gas It settles in large amounts on the floor, and on other horizontal surfaces as well.

The powder residue you get all over your hands also contains a lot of lead. If you eat with this residue still on your hands, you will contaminate your food with a significant amount of lead. You can also contaminate your food with residue from around your mouth, particularly if you have a mustache. While you are on the range, your breathing concentrates lead around your nose and upper lip, and a mustache will act as a filter to trap the particles and gases.

If you have small children, it is also important to realize that you can carry lead residue home, and contaminate your living quarters or car. You will get the dust on your shoes, on your clothes, on your shooting gear, in your hair It will then be tracked in an settle out on the floor of your home.

Exclusive use of jacketed bullets can prevent much of the lead contamination on ranges. This is much more expensive than using cast-lead reloads, and it may be impossible to arrange or enforce on many ranges. Furthermore, this still leaves the lead from the primer and from the down range impact spray. Over the past few years, most of the major manufacturers have developed lead free primers, as well as totally jacketed bullets or totally lead free (solid copper) bullets. So totally lead free ammunition is now available which will prevent lead contamination all together. Some police ranges have opted for this. However, because this ammunition is significantly more expensive, and lead free primers tend not to be as reliable as lead styphnate primers, it is not in common use.

What to do before leaving the firing range?
When you leave the range, blow your nose, and wash your hands and face immediately with cold soapy water. The cold water closes the pores of your skin, and prevents you washing lead particles into the pores. Thoroughly cleanse the facial area around your mouth, particularly if you have a mustache or beard. Wash your hands and face before you eat anything, and before you smoke. Try to wear an outer garment like a jumpsuit or coverall that you can either have washed after each range session, or leave in your locker. This will prevent you from carrying the lead dust on your clothing into your car and home. Likewise, have a pair of shoes you change out of after you get off the range. If you do go home wearing the same outer clothes you wore on the range, change out of them immediately, and put them in the washer. Washing one’s hair before bedtime is also a good idea, because your hair can hold a lot of dust, and you will transfer it to your pillow every night.

EPA Region two came up with a list of best practices which can be found at http://www.epa.gov/region02/waste/leadshot/ .

For further information there are a number of informational documents available on our website (www.epa.gov/lead). If you have any further questions please feel free to contact us at 1-800-424-LEAD.
Sincerely,

jcwit
February 16, 2012, 11:57 PM
I called the EPA lead hot line, looking for lead numbers. I wanted to know how much lead was in the air above lead casting pots, the lead mg/m3 in air from primers at a shooting range. Did not get that, instead they sent me this, which does not have measured data, etc.

Check out post # 23 at this link for info regarding lead vapors over the pot.

http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=143533&page=2

XxBulletBendeRXx
February 17, 2012, 12:09 AM
Great thread gentlemen. This information is greatly appreciated. I never gave it a thoguht about tracking lead into my home or vehicle after a day at the range. I mainly shoot outdoors, but that doesnt prevent the immediate area around me. I will be changing shoes and wearing and overgarment and designate a "only use at range hat" to take off before enertering the vehicle.
B.B.

SlamFire1
February 17, 2012, 12:14 AM
http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_v/otm_v_3.html

The current OSHA standard (29 CFR 1926.62) for lead exposure in construction has a permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air (50 µg/m3), measured as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). As with all OSHA health standards, when the PEL is exceeded, the hierarchy of controls requires employers to institute feasible engineering and work practice controls as the primary means to reduce and maintain employee exposures to levels at or below the PEL. When all feasible engineering and work practice controls have been implemented but have proven inadequate to meet the PEL, employers must nonetheless implement these controls and must supplement them with appropriate respiratory protection. The employer also must ensure that employees wear the respiratory protection provided when it is required.

I disagree with MTgun44 over lead content over casting pots. His analysis is not rigorous enough to take seriously.

Spudgunr at castbooltis calculated, based on vapor pressure, the amount of lead in the air above a casting pot.

http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=75964


But I wanted real time data over our 20 pound casting pots, not over industrial processes, such as measured in a 1969 report. To convert mg to microgram multiply by 1000.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Reloading/Lead%20Toxicity/LeadConcentrationsoverleadpots.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Reloading/Lead%20Toxicity/LeadConcentrations.jpg

I have not found measurements, either from Lyman, EPA.

jcwit
February 17, 2012, 12:18 AM
I shoot indoors, outdoors, cast my own bullets indoors, tumble my brass indoors. I don't pay any attention to what shoes I wear or hat or gloves, I do not wear gloves of any kind when reloading. I've been doing this since the 60's. My lead #'s run 4 to 6 normally, I am tested now twice a year.

I'm 68 and not going to worry about it.

To the orginal OP you may also look into dishes you use. Those numbers seem awful high.

zxcvbob
February 17, 2012, 12:19 AM
Unless they are giving you chelating agents like E.D.T.A. your blood levels won't go down. Assuming they don't, if your levels go down then the test results are B.S. / faulty / suspect. Heavy metals don't go down significantly from your blood or body on their own; this is a fact and not internet hype, speculation, or conjecture. Human bodies are not geared to getting rid of heavy metals on their own...heavy metal poisoning is a chronic condition. A little netseaching wil produce lots of results from reputable sources.

Got a reference for any of that?

SHR970
February 17, 2012, 12:25 AM
Deleted

SlamFire1
February 17, 2012, 12:28 AM
More on the hazards of indoor ranges:

LEAD POISONING – It can happen to you!
http://www.theppsc.org/Staff_Views/Heider/LeadHazards.htm


Lead Poisoning and the Shooter
http://dfuse.us/lead.html

Please note the man who died after exposure to indoor range air borne lead.

http://www.recguns.com/Sources/XIIIA5b.html

SHR970
February 17, 2012, 12:44 AM
Deleted

jcwit
February 17, 2012, 12:53 AM
Threads such as this do nothing to further the shooting sports or the reloading industry.

They only perpetuate the fear of lead way beyond reason. Even to the point of outlawing wheel weights in California.

I'm supposed to take as gospel the fear mongering of the AMA, EPA, OSHA let alone the CalOSHA, surely you jest.

Anyone here is in more danger driving to and from work! Now, how bout a smoke break!

My opinion and I'm sticking to it.

zxcvbob
February 17, 2012, 01:00 AM
Look for articles in the AMA, EPA, OSHA, CalOSHA or other reputable sources. If you really want to know do a little homework for yourself.

I'm not sure those are reputable sources anymore. And I have done a little homework on my own. Your kidneys will remove the lead from your blood.

The lead in your bones takes a lot longer to get rid of, and it will be replenishing the lead in your blood.

Vitamin C is a cheap natural chelating agent.

If you drink lots of milk, your bones will not absorb as much of the lead you are exposed to. (that's why welders drink so much milk, but I believe they are more concerned about zinc) I don't know if the calcium will displace the lead that's already there.

The main thing is to limit exposure, but if you do that your body can deal with the lead. It takes a while because of the lead in your bones.

SHR970
February 17, 2012, 01:10 AM
Deleted

SHR970
February 17, 2012, 01:12 AM
Welders worry about Manganese; the fluxing agent on welding rod.

jcwit
February 17, 2012, 01:29 AM
OSHA regulates airborne lead in indoor ranges to answer your earlier question JC. Guess what...their opinion counts to the range operators, not yours on this matter.

Guess what!!!! they do not regulate the airborne lead or any other lead at the range I'm a membor of. I think I know whereof I speak as I was on the board of directors for the last 10 years.

So I just might know what I'm talking about!

Regarding the availabity of lead wheel weights in California check out these links, better get 'em while you can.

http://www.leadfreewheels.org/

http://www.leadfreewheels.org/

http://www.changecalifornia.org/2009/05/leadwheelweights.html


http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-10023551-48.html

Might do some good to peruse this forum also for info and facts

http://castboolits.gunloads.com/

There you go.

snuffy
February 17, 2012, 02:58 AM
Why was this thread started, why not just add to the sticky thread about "SO CALLED LEAD POISONING".

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=307170

The government is trying everything to stop shooting and gun ownership in the U.S. Including causing fear among shooters about that evil lead in bullets and primers. If you buy into that hype, then you're assisting them in their task.

Anybody that spreads the junk science put out by government agencies is not helping shooters causes one bit.

Taken/copied from this thread;http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=637203


, 2012, 07:27 PM #34
Elkins45
Member


Join Date: December 25, 2009
Location: Northern KY
Posts: 216

Quote:
I would expect the hotter the lead the higher the vapor pressure.
You would expect a metal with an atomic weight of 207 to behave the same as water?

Lead bullet casting happens around 700K. The vapor pressure of Pb at that temperature is somewhere around 0.000001 mm Hg. To give you an idea of just how low that is, normal atmospheric pressure is 760 mm Hg.

http://www.powerstream.com/vapor-pressure.htm if you want to verify my numbers. I won't claim you can't poison yourself through accidental ingestion, and powder of the oxide can be an issue, but you aren't going to breathe enough Pb vapor to do it. It's just too heavy an atom.

Plus, think about all the anecdotal evidence to the contrary. Back in the days of molten lead type lithographers spent hours in rooms full of vats of molten Linotype and we don't see reams of stories of typesetters keeling over dead at a young age.

Concerns about lead poisoning are overblown.

jcwit
February 17, 2012, 04:40 AM
Amen, snuffy!

SHR970
February 17, 2012, 09:01 AM
Deleted

Tcruse
February 17, 2012, 09:46 AM
I think that the lead levels vary greatly from range to range. I suspect that the newer ranges and ones recently remodeled are probably better than the others. I know of no way to tell for sure.
I think that we as shooters should start dealing with the problem before the government gives us no choice. The EPA is generally not very nice toward shooting.
I think that total jacket or plated bullets are certainly a good place to start. I think that some ammo companies have done good work in this area. One really good example is the cabelas/Blazer TNJ (nylon jacket) ammo. It is priced at about $12/50 as list price with street price of $10. As far as reloading, there are several brands of high quality plated bullets (some noted as heavy plated) that should help.
Shooting lead cast bullets seem to have many disadvantages with heavy metal exposure being only one of them. Maybe ranges should stop allowing them and forget the steel cased or bimetal restrictions.
I do not want all copper bullets or other very high cost solutions mandated by our government. I would like to keep the government regulations out of my life as much as possible.

lizziedog1
February 17, 2012, 09:56 AM
I have a friend here that has a bullet in his leg. He jokes that when he gets an MRI he can feel the bullet warming up.

There are others that are shot and doctors decide to leave the bullet in place because trying to get it out would cause more harm.

Why don't these people drop dead from lead poisoning? They have a chunk of lead in them, and yet seem to live fine.

ranger335v
February 17, 2012, 10:07 AM
Heavy metals don't go down significantly from your blood or body on their own; this is a fact and not internet hype, speculation, or conjecture. Human bodies are not geared to getting rid of heavy metals on their own...heavy metal poisoning is a chronic condition.

As several have stated above, a lot of us have been working with lead bullets and casting a very long time, shoot and tumble a lot of bullets, etc. and have no lead problem. The observtion above is part of why I suspect going to great lengths to protect the OP from the same activities is meaningless, doubt shooting activities had anything to do with it and doubt avoiding it will reduce the internal levels.

We can all believe that IF shooting/loading actually presented any serious potential for harm our power mad nanny state EPA would be all over us in an effort to put a total stop to it; there isn't any such risk and they haven't been able to manufactor any such evidence.

As a final thought, I'll mention that a lot of people have been walking around a long time with lead bullets or fragments lodged in their bodies with no harm.

DickM
February 17, 2012, 10:08 AM
I'll just add a little real-world data, which I posted some time ago in the sticky thread on the same subject.

A few years ago, when I was somewhat more active in Bullseye competition than I am now, between matches and practice sessions I was shooting in indoor ranges about 5 or 6 evenings a week. It goes without saying that the ventilation in those ranges ranged from bad to non-existent. (As an aside, I've also shot in the state-of-the-art S&W training ranges in Springfield, MA (not the public range, which is better) - the ventilation there is pretty bad also. I very rarely encounter an indoor range that has anything resembling adequate ventilation.

Anyway, one of the guys on my team happened to have his blood, which is known medically as "serum", lead concentration tested and it came back in the low 60s mcg/dl (micrograms per deciliter, the commonly used reporting units). Because of that I had mine tested and found I was in the mid-20s. That's compared to a desirable lead concentration for an adult of less than 10 mcg/dl. We both started wearing half-face respirators with the common pink P100 pancake filters. I also started being more careful about washing my hands after shooting and started wearing the respirator when I emptied my tumbler.

After one year on the respirator, still shooting as much, his concentration came down to the mid-20s and mine had decreased to around 12 mcg/dl. For unrelated reasons, he stopped shooting shortly after that. I continued to wear the respirator for another year, at which point my lead was down to 7.9 mcg/dl.

Conclusions? Contrary to misinformation posted elsewhere in this thread, simply reducing your exposure to lead will reduce serum lead concentrations, i.e., the body does depurate lead, albeit rather slowly. Also, whether it's from lead styphnate priming compound or the lead bullets, indoor ranges are a major source of lead exposure and wearing an inexpensive respirator can reduce exposure significantly. And, my moderately elevated blood pressure, a known effect of lead exposure, has returned to near-normal levels. I've continued to wear my respirator when I shoot indoors and, in fact, would no more think of not wearing it than I would of not wearing my eye and ear protection

Hammerdown77
February 17, 2012, 11:36 AM
I'd be real curious to see someone get a blood test BEFORE they started reloading (with lead bullets), tumbling brass, and/or casting. Then have another one after a couple of years to compare it to.

After reloading for a year, and tumbling during that time, and of course doing a lot of shooting (some indoor, mostly out), I had a blood test. Mine was in the low 20's, and the doctor said that was high-ish, nothing to get overly concerned about, but to try and reduce exposure as much as possible. He was NOT AT ALL concerned about me shooting cast bullets. He asked "Do you chew on them while you're reloading? If not, don't worry about it." He was MORE CONCERNED with the dust from the tumbler, and making sure I adequately washed my hands/face/hair and clothes after an extended shooting session, especially after the indoor range. He said inhaling the smoke from firing and the dust from tumbling was FAR WORSE than just handling lead bullets.

I wish I would have had a test before I started reloading and shooting. Then I would have had a baseline to compare against. As it is now, I have no way of knowing if that increased lead level came from shooting/reloading, or from some other source like lead in dishes from CHINA, or from pipes in our house growing up, or whatever...

zxcvbob
February 17, 2012, 11:36 AM
Welders worry about Manganese; the fluxing agent on welding rod.

The welders I knew in a previous life were worried about "metal fume fever" from welding galvanized steel or mild steel coated with zinc chromate. The calcium in the milk provides some protection. At least that's what they thought and I have no reason to doubt it.

I have a friend here that has a bullet in his leg. He jokes that when he gets an MRI he can feel the bullet warming up.

That's not a problem because metallic lead is not very soluble nor reactive, and the bullet doesn't have much surface area. If you were to grind the lead into dust and inject it into someone, it would be toxic because of the huge surface area. The lungs are particularly good at absorbing lead if it's fine enough.

evan price
February 17, 2012, 04:20 PM
I cast my own boolits by the thousand, smelt my own lead ingots from hand-sorted scrap or wheel weights, pick and sort wheel weights without gloves, gather and tumble every year tens of thousands of pieces of brass outdoors and indoors, shoot and reload my own ammo, and work on machinery with babbitt bearings. I hand-dig lead from the hillside berm to get scrap bullets to melt down into ingots.

I take no special precautions other than not eating or licking my fingers until the hands have been washed after handling lead-bearing products. No dust masks, no special ventilation, dump the tumbler inside while standing over it shaking the media out. Have on occaision had the black boogers and it has set off my asthma from the tumbler dust.


To get a 64 you have something else going on. I really doubt you play with as much lead and spent brass as I do....My lead level has been 3 for several years now. Doc says anything under 4 is normal.

MrBorland
February 17, 2012, 04:24 PM
I was in a similar situation as the OP, but my levels weren't quite as high.

I switched to shooting outdoors, ultrasonically cleaning brass (Santa brought me a cleaner anyway), and changing clothes, throwing them directly in the washing machine & showering after getting home, & wearing gloves when cleaning my guns. I also switched to plated bullets. About 6 months later, my BLL actually increased a tad. :mad: Several months later, I had a 24hr urine collection test done, and it came back normal.

Though I'm still left wondering about the accuracy of the different tests, I do see BLL like I see cholesterol: 1) Some may (or may not) be predisposed to higher levels given any particular hobby/lifestyle, and 2) there's no need to panic at a high test, but there's enough evidence to suggest that high levels aren't good, and steps to keep it in check are prudent. To the conspiracist, I offer my best wishes, but prefer to not take such chances myself, especially when I can just take some simple precautions without affecting my shooting. IMHO, YMMV, etc, etc.

SlamFire1
February 18, 2012, 01:02 PM
Why don't these people drop dead from lead poisoning? They have a chunk of lead in them, and yet seem to live fine

Many do die from lead

Just do a google search to find papers and information on lead toxicity on shooting victims. The medical literature has recognized that lead projectiles must be removed after a shooting. People died from the lead left in their bodies even though they would have recovered from the trauma of their shooting.

When your bud develops lead poisoning he may have a case for medical malpractice.

Lead poisoning after gunshot wound

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1516-31802000000300006

Lead poisoning is an unusual complication of gunshot wounds. The onset of symptoms can range from two days to 52 years after the incident.1 Since this is a fatal condition, making a timely diagnosis and starting chelation therapy early is vital.

http://journals.lww.com/smajournalonline/Fulltext/2011/01000/Lead_Poisoning_from_a_Gunshot_Wound.17.aspx


Lead poisoning from retained lead foreign bodies has been commonly reported within the medical literature

http://www.vahealth.org/leadsafe/documents/11062006/Lead_Newsletter_Vol_2_Issue_1.pdf


Lead arthritis and lead poisoning following bullet wounds: A clinicopathologic, ultrastructural, and microanalytic study of two cases
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0046817788803538

What are the lead poisoning risks of a lead pellet, bullet or shot lodged in the body?http://www.lead.org.au/fs/fst70.html

Change in Blood Lead Concentration up to 1 Year after a Gunshot Wound with a Retained Bullethttp://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/159/7/683.full

The common belief that intraarticular bullets should not be removed has no benefit and may result in unwanted long term complications.

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-1947/1/171

Lead Poisoning from an Intra-Articular Shotgun Pellet in the Knee Treated with Arthroscopic Extraction and Chelation Therapy. A Case Report
http://www.jbjs.org/article.aspx?articleid=23226

Systemic Lead Poisoning Due to an Intra-articular Bullet http://www.orthosupersite.com/view.aspx?rid=2933

President Andrew Jackson suffered from lead poisoning due to the bullets in his body
http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/282/6/569.full

jcwit
February 18, 2012, 01:20 PM
Well according to the above post I guess we should all give up the shooting sports and just roll over and die.

I think I'll go with evan prices experiences and my own. The medical community can come up with just about anything they wish at any one time.

Remember a few years ago eggs were hazardous to your health.

Last year it was salt.

And yet our life expectancy continues to lengthen.

SlamFire1
February 18, 2012, 05:41 PM
Well according to the above post I guess we should all give up the shooting sports and just roll over and die.

No, you should avoid getting shot! :uhoh:

And avoid duels. :D

jcwit
February 18, 2012, 06:20 PM
No, you should avoid getting shot!

Ok! Sounds like a plan to me.

I still contend the fear of lead is grossly overstated, and the same for mercury.

Threads such as this do nothing to further the shooting sports or the reloading industry.

They only perpetuate the fear of lead way beyond reason. Even to the point of outlawing wheel weights in California.

I'm supposed to take as gospel the fear mongering of the AMA, EPA, OSHA let alone the CalOSHA, surely you jest.

Anyone here is in more danger driving to and from work! Now, how bout a smoke break!

My opinion and I'm sticking to it.

Odd Job
February 18, 2012, 06:29 PM
Big difference between lead poisoning from a retained lead bullet vs inhaled lead particles.
Having said that I got a baseline serum lead level test done last year and I came out slightly high. I shoot in an indoor range about 4 times a month, mainly .22LR and usually 200 rounds minimum.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g154/Odd_Job/Untitled-1.jpg

While it is out of the reference range, I will be doing these tests every year.

Odd Job
February 18, 2012, 06:42 PM
Coincidentally, I gave a talk to some radiographers yesterday and this was one of the slides:

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g154/Odd_Job/Untitled-2.jpg

That is a bullet shot at a downward trajectory through a man's thigh. It fractured the distal femur, passed through both joint surfaces and embedded in the tibial plateau such that the base of the bullet was exposed to synovial fluid in the knee joint.
Synovial fluid can dissolve lead and make it available in toxic levels. Hazards applicable to this case are:
* mechanical hazard (just like any other metallic foreign body)
* possible ferromagnetic hazard (it is not possible to exclude ferrous materials on these radiographs)
* plumbism (lead poisoning)
* sharps hazard (at retrieval). Whilst it could not be proved with 100% certainty that the round was jacketed, the reduced number of lead specks in the wound and the flattening of the projetile (compare the two views) indicates this is likely to be jacketed. And if some lead has come out of the round, there is likely to be a jacket edge, which could be sharp.

In other cases, there is an extra hazard which is possible if the projectile has access to significant blood vessels. It can embolise. This is more common in shotgun injuries, but there have been cases reported where handgun rounds and even rifle rounds have ended up in major arteries and embolised.

edwin41
February 18, 2012, 06:43 PM
i also cast my own bullets indoors , with a good ventilation above the pot.
i smelt my scraplead into ingots the same way.
i shoot all of my ammo indoors , where theres some sort of ventilation.

call me stupid or ignorant , but i will continue to do this in this way.

i aint to concerned about the lead poisoning .

there are far more dangers in this life to consider , still we take our chances
every day , without thinking about it i think.

jcwit
February 18, 2012, 06:45 PM
We are all doomed from the day the Dr. slaps us on the butt.

ArtP
February 18, 2012, 08:50 PM
I found this thread pretty interesting -- especially all the conflicting information.

I have decided to sell all my self defense arms favoring a pressurized canister (like pepper spray) filled with lead dust, heavily used corn cob and mercury from broken thermometers. And I can take it on airplanes, in courtrooms and to the post office. Then I'm going to save up all my dryer sheets from tumbling and hang them over my exterior doors and windows, like mistletoe.

zxcvbob
February 18, 2012, 09:04 PM
You can't take mercury on an airplane. :neener: (look it up; it's pretty interesting)

x_wrench
February 19, 2012, 11:37 AM
i have been shooting for years, never had my lead levels checked. but about 4 years ago, i started casting. and like anything elese, there is a learning curve to it. i made a couple of stupid mistakes. i was not feeling real well, so i had it checked. i can not tell you what the numbers were, but i was fine, even after the stupid mistakes. i have been reloading for years. but i have never, ever shot in an indoor range. one of those, without a very good ventilation system, seems to me like a great spot to elevate your lead levels. mostly from the primers.

DickM
February 19, 2012, 12:11 PM
Well according to the above post I guess we should all give up the shooting sports and just roll over and die.

Why do you seem to think the only choices are to either (1) ignore (and at the same time denigrate those who try to point out) a potential risk in the face of overwhelming evidence that it exists or (2) assume that nothing short of total cessation of anything related to the shooting sports can help? Nobody here is suggesting that it's not possible to enjoy our shooting/handloading/casting hobby - only that, like many other enjoyable things in life, there is potential risk involved from exposure to lead that can be mitigated by taking a few simple precautions. (Or, as I said in another post, recognize that the risks exist but choose to do nothing to mitigate them - that's a perfectly rational position, but pretending there is no risk is not.)

I'll be taking my kayak out shortly, and will be wearing my PDF and potentially a helmet. I find that to be a reasonable response to the potential risks involved, rather than the irrational options of (1) pretending that people can't drown or (2) giving up the sport because I can't think of any way to mitigate the risks.

jcwit
February 19, 2012, 12:57 PM
Why do you seem to think the only choices are to either (1) ignore (and at the same time denigrate those who try to point out) a potential risk in the face of overwhelming evidence that it exists or (2) assume that nothing short of total cessation of anything related to the shooting sports can help? Nobody here is suggesting that it's not possible to enjoy our shooting/handloading/casting hobby - only that, like many other enjoyable things in life, there is potential risk involved from exposure to lead that can be mitigated by taking a few simple precautions.

Regarding the item you list as number (1). I'll basically ignore as it has not been my experience in my 40 plus years of reloading and in living in an older home, "one my family has lived in since the 1880" that I'm sure has lead paint in it and is sided with asbestos siding.
Also my experience is supported by many other casters and shooters. Maybe not from the AMA or OSHA. I've dealt with OSHA a couple of times, not as a owner of a company or one who is in management, but as a common worker. I informed the OSHA inspector to get the He!! out of my way and allow me to finish my work, the idiot had no idea what he was talking about and had never even seen the type of machine I was operating.

Regarding # (2) My feelings is that the whole issue is entirely overblown.

Please reread my posts # 24, 29, & 46

I'm 68 years young and have things much more important to worry about than lead, which my reading have stayed in the 4 to 6 range for the last 10 plus years.

This is still my opinion and I'm still sticking to it.

BTW the single sentence you quoted was pretty much made in jest, sorry you couldn't get that.

DickM
February 19, 2012, 03:46 PM
I'm 68 years young and have things much more important to worry about than lead, which my reading have stayed in the 4 to 6 range for the last 10 plus years.

This is still my opinion and I'm still sticking to it.


We're of equivalent age. I'm planning on living long enough so that it makes sense for me to take reasonable precautions now to protect my health. You say you know your serum lead concentration and have (correctly) determined it's not a problem for you. That's very different from ignoring (your word) the problem, which your remarks may encourage others to do to their detriment.

You're entitled to your own opinions, just not your own facts.

brickeyee
February 19, 2012, 04:13 PM
You can't take mercury on an airplane.

You should see how mercury attacks and weakens aluminum.

Most of the articles linked involve either a large number of small lead particles (like shot), or presence of the lead near major joints with large amounts of synovial fluid contact.
Synovial fluid in joints has been well known to leach lead nicely.

Some are just plain ridiculous in equating contact with organic lead compounds and skin contact.
The most common ‘lead’ in lead paint is lead acetate (AKA ‘sugar of lead’)/
Lead pigments disappeared a long time ago, and most are lead oxides that are not especially soluble.

Lead acetate is very soluble if ingested (eating or breathing dust with lead acetate) and very available for bioaccumulation.

A single bullet not near a major joint is not going to do much at all, not or handling lead, or even swallowing an occasional piece of shot from hunting (it goes right on through).

Lead can create odd risks though.
Touching lead and then handling cigarettes can put lead powder on the cigarette.
Smoking past the now contaminated area will vaporize the finely divided lead and it can easily be absorbed in the lungs.

If lead casting temperatures are held to around 750 F, there is not much lead vapor.
Using a flame to speed melting can produce lead vapor easily though.
The flame temperature can be more than high enough to boil lead (3180F).

If the lead goes much over 750 F any tin can also start to separate out.

There is one study floating around from gunshot victims showing a rise in blood lead levels, but the study also show the blood lead level starting to fall as the surface of the lead is rendered inert by the body.

The dangers have been exaggerated in a ridiculous fashion.

Child blood lead levels have fallen nicely with the removal of lead tetra-ethyl from gasoline.
It was used as a knock inhibitor increasing the apparent octane of motor tested gasoline (now you now how gasoline can apparently have more than 100% octane).
It also created a witch's brew of organic lead compounds when the fuel burned that could easily be inhaled and absorbed.
Anyone living in a city with a lot of traffic absorbed lead, and children with a lower body mass had increased blood lead levels.

jolly roger
February 19, 2012, 05:47 PM
I have been a firearms instructor for 25 years on an indoor range and tumble brass indoors all the time. I get tested every physical and no ill effects yet. I DO however wash the living crap out of my hands each and every time I shoot or tumble brass...always. I have seen shooters eat a sandwich right after shooting tons of cast bullets with their fingers still black...that's not prudent IMHO.

Hondo 60
February 19, 2012, 10:36 PM
My take on it is that we're all different.
Some of us absorb lead from thin air & some could eat a pound a day & eliminate all of it.

Me personally? It seems that I'm one of those who can absorb it just by looking at it.
In Aug 2011 my lead level was 29.
I stopped using lead bullets & went with jacketed or plated & started taking 1000mg of Vitamin C.

Six weeks later it was at 23, 2 weeks ago my level was at 20.

I rarely shoot at an indoor range & wash my hands regularly after handling ammo.
And I don't cast.

Just my 2 ˘

SlamFire1
February 19, 2012, 11:19 PM
ever shot in an indoor range. one of those, without a very good ventilation system, seems to me like a great spot to elevate your lead levels. mostly from the primers.

I just don't know what to say about indoor ranges. A local indoor range that I occasionally shot in, the ventilation system feels very strong. Powder smoke rapidly disappears down range.

And yet, when I had my lead levels checked, my Doc said one of his patients works at that range. And his lead leads were "very high".

Of course, his exact lead levels are his personal medical information and no one else's business so lets leave it at that.

Based on my review of lead data and the interest in lead toxicity, I hate to say it guys, but expect cast lead bullet bans in the future. A couple of successful lead lawsuits against indoor ranges and you can expect they will either shut down, or require shooters to only use FMJ, jacketed, or copper plated bullets.

You can then expect that to follow to public or for profit outside ranges.

Odd Job
February 20, 2012, 02:08 AM
Or we could see the birth of the tactical mask: the camo version of what the doctors wear...

Tcruse
February 20, 2012, 09:58 AM
"Based on my review of lead data and the interest in lead toxicity, I hate to say it guys, but expect cast lead bullet bans in the future. A couple of successful lead lawsuits against indoor ranges and you can expect they will either shut down, or require shooters to only use FMJ, jacketed, or copper plated bullets"

We as handgun shooters should start looking for solutions before a solution is forced on us. I for one am trying to support the ammo makers that have cleaner ammo at the same price point as other range ammo. Cabelas/Blazer TNJ seems to be something that we all should try and see if there are any down sides to this approach. It has done really well in every gun that I have tried. It sells locally for $10 to $12 for 9mm. I would hope the solution would not be much higher cost for ammo.

jcwit
February 20, 2012, 11:04 AM
I would hope the solution would not be much higher cost for ammo.

Oh, It'll be higher, you can take that to the bank.

zxcvbob
February 20, 2012, 11:07 AM
I wish non-toxic primers were available for reloaders. (BTW, corrosive primers are nontoxic)

john16443
February 20, 2012, 12:32 PM
I wish non-toxic primers were available for reloaders. (BTW, corrosive primers are nontoxic)
They are for SPP, if you're willing to pay the premium. Something I'm looking into. Maybe I'll have a use for all that SPP 45ACP brass after all.

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/92

http://www.ballisticproducts.com/Fiocchi-Zero-Pollution_leadless-SP-Primers-1500_bx/productinfo/965445SMZP/

jack44
February 20, 2012, 01:28 PM
I use lead bullets but shoot outdoors.

1KPerDay
February 20, 2012, 01:57 PM
They are for SPP, if you're willing to pay the premium. Something I'm looking into. Maybe I'll have a use for all that SPP 45ACP brass after all.

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/92

http://www.ballisticproducts.com/Fiocchi-Zero-Pollution_leadless-SP-Primers-1500_bx/productinfo/965445SMZP/
John, do you happen to know if this type of primer requires the larger primer holes typical to "leadless" or "lead-free" ammunition?

Clark
February 20, 2012, 02:28 PM
15 years ago there were lots of threads on rec.guns about Lead poisoning [pre WWW forums].

If you have very high blood Lead levels, you did not get it from guns. Most likely it was from power sanding Lead paint.

brickeyee
February 20, 2012, 02:47 PM
And yet, when I had my lead levels checked, my Doc said one of his patients works at that range. And his lead leads were "very high".

He is exposed every day, for who knows how long each day.

Unless you shoot every day for the amount of time he works you are unlikely to have anything approaching his exposure.

His is occupational exposure.

john16443
February 20, 2012, 04:53 PM
John, do you happen to know if this type of primer requires the larger primer holes typical to "leadless" or "lead-free" ammunition?
Sorry, don't have a clue. Since it is sold as a component, I cant imagine that it wouldn't work in a normal primer hole size. Maybe a submittal through the manufacturers "Contact Us" page would get an answer?

A prudent course of action if you try this is, as always, start low and work up.

ggood
February 20, 2012, 07:43 PM
I guess I'm the guy who started this thread.I do not work for the govt or the anti gun crowd.If you are one of those who think I'm trying to sabatoge the shooting sports just keep doing what you have been as long as you feel OK. The reason I am bringing this up is because I love shooting and it is my main hobby.I also believe strongly in self defense and dont want to die and get sick at my own hand.Yes call it what you want but I am scared of lead poisoning and bringing the lead dust into my home for wife,children and grandchildren to breath. Hopefully my levels will go down and I will continue to shoot outdoors. PS I also just learned that when you leave the range you must wash with cold water as it closes the pores. I have been using hot water with a soft scrub brush on my hands and nails.

gpb
February 20, 2012, 08:09 PM
I'm more concerned about lead from the glaze of some of the cheap coffee mugs made in China.

jcwit
February 20, 2012, 08:30 PM
I'm more concerned about the idiots on the road I have to share it with who are talking on their cell phone or texting then I am lead, but thats just me.

At least the lead I have control over, but I have none when the other driver crosses the center line and comes right at me.

snuffy
February 20, 2012, 09:43 PM
Based on my review of lead data and the interest in lead toxicity, I hate to say it guys, but expect cast lead bullet bans in the future. A couple of successful lead lawsuits against indoor ranges and you can expect they will either shut down, or require shooters to only use FMJ, jacketed, or copper plated bullets.

You can then expect that to follow to public or for profit outside ranges.

Good job! :neener: I was being sarcastic.

You've already turned some, that have read your links, away from using lead. Instead of cut & paste from government agencies, find something positive or neutral about shooting/casting lead.

We've become a society of fear about things that used to be common practice. I rode bikes all of my youth, never had a brain bucket on once. Did our heads suddenly become softer in the last 30 years?

I'm getting much closer to the end of my life. But fear mongering about that evil lead will probably result in some sort of ammo ban before I die. I've already seen lead shot banned, which lead to me having to give up duck hunting. Now they want to ban it for everything. ************ banned lead of any kind in ammo used in most of the state for hunting.

It wasn't fought by hunters because they didn't care----enough. The junk science that supported that ban was something to behold. They claimed that condors were getting lead poisoning by eating gut piles from game killed by hunters using lead cored rifle bullets. Most of us know that bullets almost always pass through the entrails, those that remain in the animal stop in the muscle mass to be taken home by the hunter.

ggood
February 22, 2012, 07:56 PM
Spoke to my doc again and said my reg blood count and all was ok so don't panic about lead levels. Will check into it in a month for followup and see if its going down. everything else ok. house came up with 3 out of ten swabs higher than it shoul be. should be forty.Reloading table read over 1000 and floor by table 86 even though you cant see any dust.Rest of house is from 41-less than 10. Will hepa vacuum the hell out of this place and wash down reloading table wearing gloves and filter mask. Feel better already.Tell you the truth I was in panic mode.Its time for housecleaning even though. house looks clean. To tell you the truth the epa which the lab notifys did not try to talk against shooting just to take the proper precautions. Thanks for all your help and hope some learned from my stupidity.

SlamFire1
February 22, 2012, 08:43 PM
Spoke to my doc again and said my reg blood count and all was ok so don't panic about lead levels. Will check into it in a month for followup and see if its going down. everything else ok. house came up with 3 out of ten swabs higher than it shoul be. should be forty.Reloading table read over 1000 and floor by table 86 even though you cant see any dust.Rest of house is from 41-less than 10. Will hepa vacuum the hell out of this place and wash down reloading table wearing gloves and filter mask. Feel better already.Tell you the truth I was in panic mode.Its time for housecleaning even though. house looks clean. To tell you the truth the epa which the lab notifys did not try to talk against shooting just to take the proper precautions. Thanks for all your help and hope some learned from my stupidity.

Where did you get the swabs?

Do you cast at your reloading table or do you only seat bullets there?

I am curious to know because if the lead count is 1000 and all you are doing is loading and seating lead bullets, then I need to do something at my bench.

kelbro
February 22, 2012, 11:16 PM
That would be a good poll item. Everybody use the same tester, swab their benches and post up the numbers. Should prove enlightening as I haven't cleaned my bench off in 5 years and I cast off to the side of it.

zxcvbob
February 22, 2012, 11:34 PM
Do you cast at your reloading table or do you only seat bullets there?
I am curious to know because if the lead count is 1000 and all you are doing is loading and seating lead bullets, then I need to do something at my bench.


Probably spent-primer dust from decapping.

ggood
February 23, 2012, 03:53 PM
reload cast bullets and deprime. Also empty tumbler (closed type) put cases thru strainer and shake neat there. I have two dillons to work with on bench plus Lyman turret press.Washed down table today(table from dillon)and its like a hard pressed board but chemicals seemed to have seeped into table. Breakfree oil and whatever if I once in a blue moon cleaned a gun on the table. One thing ,everyone can do as they please but no dirty indoor ranges for me and only jacketed bullets.Forgot to answer your Question-I buy my cast bullets ,probably from tumbling and depriming and the bullets still sometimes wind up on table . Looking at the reloading presses after a while they get all cruddy from dust and Have had to wipe them off plenty of times.

Pete D.
February 24, 2012, 07:39 AM
Contrary to misinformation posted elsewhere in this thread, simply reducing your exposure to lead will reduce serum lead concentrations, i.e., the body does depurate lead, albeit rather slowly. Also, whether it's from lead styphnate priming compound or the lead bullets, indoor ranges are a major source of lead exposure and wearing an inexpensive respirator can reduce exposure significantly.

Absolutely. Lead will leach from the body at about 2-3 mcgs/dl per month if the source of contamination is stopped. This was told to me by a Doctor after I'd had my blood tested and it came back at 42mcg/dl. My own experience bears this out. I shot outdoors, stopped casting for a while, used plated bullets and my serum lead level came down at just that rate; after six months, it was in the low 20's. After a year, it was at 12.
(btw - when I do not do these things, my lead level rises.)
I have returned to casting and to indoor shooting. I cast outdoors - or "kinda" outdoors...in my garage with windows and the bay doors open. I wear a HEPA dust mask when there are more than a couple of shooters using the range indoors. I wash my hands immediately after shooting and my face also.
I have taken to keeping a canister of "D-lead" hand wipes on the table at the range for shooters to use when they finish.
I often wonder whether some of us are more susceptible to lead absorption than others. There are multiple examples of shooters who did the same things that I did and whose lead levels did not rise. In any case, lead poisoning is a real and dangerous problem and citing the personal fact that you have not had lead levels rise despite taking no precautions does not change that.
All one can say is "Good for you. Hope that your good fortune continues." And, yes, there are other problems that need our attention; yes, there are other causes of lead poisoning. Using either of those truths to imply that we should not concern ourselves with lead exposure is irresponsible.
Pete

john16443
February 24, 2012, 10:50 AM
I'm encouraged to hear of your experiences Pete D. My recent tests came back at high 40's, and I have voluntarlily sworn off all shooting and reloading activities for a 3 month period until I get rechecked in mid May. It will be a long Spring is all I'll say about that. I'm really hoping my drops will be at least what you've experienced. While I can't get away from shooting indoors, I will be doing things differently to say the least. I've also completely re-evaluated my reloading processes and have the next couple of months to change/buy some equipment to eliminate the potential for generating dust of any kind during the brass cleaning and depriming/loading phases. I don't cast, but have sworn off shooting lead, including FMJ with exposed lead bases. That's a personal choice that will result in slightly higher reloading costs, but Precision Bullets work well for me. If I can get below 20 after 6 months or so like you, and can continue a downward trend after that, I may decide to move back to lead bullets.

ggood
February 24, 2012, 11:23 AM
as to Slam Fire's question-I went to loews and bought 3M lead test tube at $25 dollars.Read alot and alot of controversy as to their accuracy and false reading. also they dont give values of lead just that its their. EPA said it is normal for some traces of lead to be on many floor etc but the question is how much.to hire lead consultant total $450.00. It was worth it. Now I can relax as I believe I cleaned up well and will take proper precautions when I get back to shooting and reloading. I will remember to change shoes and clothes also so I dont track stuff into my house and car if I can help it.

1KPerDay
February 24, 2012, 12:45 PM
Thanks for the updates, ggood.

Hammerdown77
February 24, 2012, 01:06 PM
I'm more concerned about lead from the glaze of some of the cheap coffee mugs made in China.
You know, this is a really good point. My blood lead levels were higher than I thought they should be, and when I looked at my coffee mugs many of them were painted and made in China.

Hmmm...

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