new recoil spring


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RRHFactor
February 17, 2012, 08:49 PM
I put a 17 lb recoil spring in my ppk/s taking out the factory 20 lb. What sort of limitations do I have when it comes to ammo. Thanks.

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Walt Sherrill
February 17, 2012, 08:58 PM
A recoil spring has one main function: to load the next round and close the slide after the shot. If the spring is too strong, it may keep the slide from functioning properly (i.e., the ammo may not have enough force to push it back properly). If it's too weak, the spent cases may be sent way too far.

A weak recoil spring isn't likely to hurt anything, as the rearward movement of the slide isn't particularly hard on the gun. A very strong spring might cause damage when the slide slams forward -- and in some gun may eventually damage the slide stop.

Changing the spring will cause your experience of recoil to be different. If you're having trouble racking the slide. If you're shooting hot ammo, you may see the cases go farther.

(1911Tuner, who participates here, demonstrates to non-believers that you can shoot a 1911 without a recoil spring and not be overwhelmed by the force of recoil. No damage, either. The slide just won't close automatically.)

1SOW
February 17, 2012, 11:55 PM
I put a 17 lb recoil spring in my ppk/s taking out the factory 20 lb. What sort of limitations do I have when it comes to ammo. Thanks.
I don't have a PPK, but have some experience lightening pistol springs.

Walt Sherrill tells it like it is.

Many, if not most pistols will accept a lighter hammer spring. The "IF" is if it's too light. 1. it may not feed 100% 2. It may cause intermittent light primer strikes and FTFire.
As a PURE W.A.G., 20# going to 17 should work fine, IF you were getting good solid primer hit with the 20# spring.
If your cases are flying into the next county, the spring is too light. AGAIN, this is just a guess based on some experience with other pistols.

By coincidence, my 9mm CZ75 came with a 20# hammer/mainspring. It now runs 100% reliably with a 13# spring with some coils cut off. By going this light, I had to further modify the firing pin to get reliable strikes with both WIN and FED primers (the two softest primers). My light loads are thrown about 6'. With a 15# spring it will feed and fire anything available. With factory target loads, the cases fly maybe 7'. Not much change.

Hope this makes sense.

Walt Sherrill
February 18, 2012, 12:19 AM
We're shifted the discussion and we're now talking about two different things here: recoil springs and hammer springs.

As I understood the question, it was about the RECOIL spring, and not the hammer spring.

(The weights mentioned are close to the CZ Hammer spring weights, which may have caused the issue.)

A lighter hammer spring CAN lead to light primer strikes -- but as 1SOW notes, not always.

I've dropped hammer spring weights on some guns, but it's not something I do as often as dropping recoil spring weight. (I've found that it helps a lot with 3rd Gen. S&Ws to go down a pound or two on the hammer spring.)

That said, I have no way of guessing how a 3lb. lighter HAMMER SPRING would affect the performance of the PPK/S. As noted, a lighter recoil spring isn't going to have much effect on performance; a 10%-15% lighter hammer/mainspring might...


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