Does your indoor range prohibit the collection of brass?


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gspn
February 17, 2012, 10:32 PM
The indoor range i use prohibits the collection of any brass you didn't bring in with you.

If you buy "house ammo" then you are supposed to leave it on the deck. They collect it and send it off for re-loading. They then sell it in house...it's cheap and good enough for target shooting.

Does your range do this?

I don't have a problem with it...Im just curious as to how many others see the same thing.

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jcwit
February 17, 2012, 10:44 PM
If I pay money for it, no matter how much or how little, it belongs to me. After all, I paid for it.

Otto
February 17, 2012, 10:49 PM
The indoor range i use prohibits the collection of any brass you didn't bring in with you.

Does your range do this?

Yes they do and it seems to keep the brass whores at bay.

Lost Sheep
February 17, 2012, 11:12 PM
If I went to a range like that it would be revolver, aluminum cased ammo and 22 rimfire only. My brass is mine.

If they sell me ammo with the price reduced to account for them keeping the brass, that might be satisfactory, but I doubt the math would work out that way.

I would approach the management and propose that I would use a brass catching dropcloth or something and keep my brass. If not, they would have a problem keeping me as a client.

I understand that shooters competing over (fighting over whose brass is whose?) brass on the floor is a concern in many places and some collection techniques are unsafe, so the simplicity of a complete ban is appealilng to the management. However, I don't think I would want to shoot next to someone who cannot collect their own brass safely or who would fight over disputed ownership.

I sympathize with the management's plight. But not so much that I will donate my brass to their money till. Now, if they allow me to deduct the value of my brass from my range fees/membership fees, I will negotiate an accomodation.

I am not completely unreasonable. Just mostly.

Lost Sheep

Mike 27
February 17, 2012, 11:20 PM
The range here is a state fish and game range. They let you pick up, and you can go through the buckets and dig it out as well. They provide brooms and squeegee's to retrieve what goes over the firing line and stays in reach with the tools. Looks like we are lucky here.

JRH6856
February 17, 2012, 11:25 PM
I use a catalog case for a range bag. I made a hood of netting that stretches over two hoops attached to the catalog case. It looks kind of like a covered wagon. I shoot from "inside the wagon" with the muzzle extending just outside, and the brass drops into the case.

R.W.Dale
February 17, 2012, 11:34 PM
You guys need to work on your reading retention skills.

The op clearly states his ranges rules allow him to keep HIS brass with the statement "any brass you didn't bring in with you"

posted via tapatalk using android.

J_McLeod
February 17, 2012, 11:56 PM
I've only shot at two indoor ranges. Bullseye in Tacoma and The Marksman in Tucson. I don't remember an official policy at either. No one ever bothered me while picking up my brass and everyone else's (with permission).

JRH6856
February 18, 2012, 12:02 AM
OK, OK, sheesh. The range I use sells the brass to a remanufacturer, but allows anyone to pick up ther own brass including that purchased there. They don't really monitor the brass behind the line so you can pick up all you want withing "ejection range of your station as long as other shooters don't mind. A majority of the brass seems to end up in front of the firing line and that is off limits unless you have a Brass Mower with a long handle.

JoeMal
February 18, 2012, 12:11 AM
Most of the indoor ranges I've been to let you field your own brass, but I think they look down on you taking brass that isn't yours.

Of course, nobody is ever there watching what you pick-up...so it's really hard to say

SEE IT LIKE A NATIVE
February 18, 2012, 12:13 AM
I try to get a range station (indoor ) in the right hand corner if its available , so my brass stays in the general area . Outside I usually shoot a revolver so it is not a problem ! Kevin

W.E.G.
February 18, 2012, 12:28 AM
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/humor/brassthief1.jpg

mgmorden
February 18, 2012, 12:56 AM
The indoor range doesn't have any official policy on it that I've seen. I've always picked my brass up. I'm the only person I see doing it though. Everybody else sweeps up their brass and tosses it in a big bucket.

The public outdoor range is another matter. Not only do they not care, but people don't even sweep it up. Whenever I'm running low on brass I drive down there after dark on a weekend night and just load up whatever I want. I usually get enough of whatever I'm looking for (typically 9mm luger) to fullfill my needs :).

gahunter12
February 18, 2012, 01:14 AM
The indoor range that I shoot at does not have a posted policy on brass. That being said I do watch the others at the range and ask if they reload. If it's a "NO" I ask if they mind me saving it and offer to clean up after them. I have never had them say no and often they will collect it and hand there brass over before leaving. The range does have buckets for empty brass which are sold to Atlanta Ammo. I don't go thru the buckets unless I loose a few cases to the Hot side of the range. Then I will replace my lost cases from the bucket. I have often considered asking if I could dig thru the buckets, but almost afraid to ask and cause attention to me collecting brass on the floor.

Lost Sheep
February 18, 2012, 02:19 AM
I use a catalog case for a range bag. I made a hood of netting that stretches over two hoops attached to the catalog case. It looks kind of like a covered wagon. I shoot from "inside the wagon" with the muzzle extending just outside, and the brass drops into the case.
I have tried to make something like that, with limited success. Can you post (or send me) pictures or dimensions, please?

Thanks.

Lost Sheep

carbuncle
February 18, 2012, 03:09 AM
If they do, I don't know it!

Wish I had a public outdoor range nearby...

chrt396
February 18, 2012, 03:19 AM
Yes they do and it seems to keep the brass whores at bay.
Hey....I represent that remark!!

chrt396
February 18, 2012, 03:25 AM
Our range's policy is...leave only with the brass you walked in with. Many times you'll have a shooter who does not collect their brass who will offer his brass to the guy next to him that he sees saving it. I stood next to a guy that was firing off box after box of quality ammo...400-500 rounds..of 45acp. He offered...I could not refuse. 95% of the stuff that hits the ground goes in to a bucket and is sorted and sold by our club to support the Junior Shooters program.

41 Mag
February 18, 2012, 06:28 AM
Of the public ranges I have been to both indoors and out, usually you police up your own cases, and if someone leaves stuff behind your allowed to police it up as well.

This said, one outdoor range feels that anything left behind is theirs if it is on the ground, and if left on one of the benches is policed up by the range master. They in turn either sell it as once fired or sell it as scrap. Their range their rules. I only shoot my rifles there on rare occasion.

An indoor which I heard about, but haven't been to yet opened recently. It is said to have a raised fiberglass grate floor along the shooting booths, which allows the expended cases to fall through preventing any sort of slipping hazard, explained to me by a friend who went there. Anything which goes through, then belongs to the range, who from what I was told, also uses it and sells reloads at a very reduced price.

Another indoor range I used to frequent a LOT sold reduced price loads, which you could also return for a $5 deposit for the plastic case and expended brass.

I am with most who feel if I carry it in I am going to carry it out if it can safely be reached. As for the newer range, I might head over with my revolvers, but won't be making the trip with any of my auto's for sure.

777TRUTH
February 18, 2012, 07:23 AM
One indoor range forbids collection of any brass, even the stuff you bring. I never went back.

Another lets you keep your brass only, he sells the rest as scrap or to reloaders.

My fav will let youkeep your brass and other shooters if you ask and aren't annoying about it.

Mr.Revolverguy
February 18, 2012, 07:44 AM
Indoor range range 10 minutes away from me

No reloads - though they sell remanufactured.
No picking up brass at all period.

I went in with revolvers once and started sitting my brass on my range table, the range officer walked up reached around me and started pushing it all on the floor 357 and 44mag brass. He says didn't you read the sign all brass stays in the range. The safety form you signs says "NO RANGE BRASS PICKING UP ALLOWED" I went and spoke with the owner and explained he said if I allow you I have to allow everyone. I told him no look I was shooting a revolver and your employee pushed my brass to the floor. He botched showed me his retired Sheriff ID and said it is a loosing argument, I left without my brass and pissed and never been back and tell everyone I see never to go there.

Beancounter81
February 18, 2012, 09:24 AM
The indoor range I use allows collection of your brass - whether you brought it in with you or bought it from them. You just aren't supposed to pick up brass from any other lane and can't pick up anything forward of the firing line.

dbarnhart
February 18, 2012, 09:58 AM
I shoot weekly at an indoor range. we're not allowed to collect brass that falls forward of the firing line. All brass behind the firing line is fair game. I always use a brass catcher to make sure I go home with my precious brass.

On the upside, brass that falls forward of the line is collected and resold to members at a very attractive price.

moxie
February 18, 2012, 10:37 AM
I prefer the term "brass wolf."

MikeRussell
February 18, 2012, 11:24 AM
the local indoor range/gun shop/cop shop tells everyone not to pick up their brass, that they will take care of it. The make sure that there is no aluminum or steel cased ammo, as well as no steel core bullets. They scoop it all up and put it in 5gal buckets then go take it to the recycling plant. I used to shoot there a lot and picked up all my own brass, but they all knew that I was a competitive shooter and reloader...I could take a LITTLE extra and they were fine with that, but not much more than what I came in with. I've thought of going down there to offer to buy some of the brass that they collect...clean & reload the brass I want and sell the brass I don't need/want.

beatledog7
February 18, 2012, 11:52 AM
My brass is my brass.

When I shoot a semi-auto, I try to find as many of the casings as possible. When I eject a mag, I bench the gun and collect the brass before inserting another. This slows me down and keeps the brass from building up around me or getting picked up by someone else. (Of course I practice reloading at speed as well, but that's a separate activity.)

With revolvers, I eject the brass onto a small towel on the bench and rebox it then and there, before I reload.

When I shoot a bolt/lever action rifle, I cycle the action in such a way as to be able to corral the spent casings. Again, I box them before I reload.

I'll ask others for their brass only if I see that they're about to bucket it. Sometimes a shooter prefers that the range get the brass based on what the range does with it, and I respect that.

However, as long as nobody objects, I don't go into brass deficit. For example, if I shoot 30 rounds of .40S&W, I leave with 30 spent .40S&W casings. If that means pulling a handful from the bucket, so be it.

The bottom line: I won't pay to shoot at a range that wants to steal my brass.

nambu1
February 18, 2012, 01:59 PM
The indoor range close to me (30 miles) have a sign that states that once the brass touches the floor, it belongs to them.

Lost Sheep
February 18, 2012, 02:23 PM
The indoor range close to me (30 miles) have a sign that states that once the brass touches the floor, it belongs to them.
Then I would spread a dropcloth that prevents it from touching the floor. Heck, I would I would duct tape an inverted beach umbrella to my right hip just to make the point. "My brass is my brass."

Pay me to leave it there or let me retrieve it.

At least they have the decency to inform you beforehand.

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
February 18, 2012, 02:39 PM
the local indoor range/gun shop/cop shop tells everyone not to pick up their brass, that they will take care of it. The make sure that there is no aluminum or steel cased ammo, as well as no steel core bullets. They scoop it all up and put it in 5gal buckets then go take it to the recycling plant. I used to shoot there a lot and picked up all my own brass, but they all knew that I was a competitive shooter and reloader...I could take a LITTLE extra and they were fine with that, but not much more than what I came in with. I've thought of going down there to offer to buy some of the brass that they collect...clean & reload the brass I want and sell the brass I don't need/want.
That would make a lot of sense. Brass metal price is a lot lower than brass casing prices and you could realize a savings and they greater revenue at the same time. As long as it doesn't result in more administrative time for them (if more shooters also want to buy brass, that could result in more of their time spent dealing with the money, etc) or liability (be prepared to sign a waiver absolving them of liability for defective brass).

If you could commit to do it for a full year, they might accept a trial of this contract: The continue to sort the steel and aluminum out, you buy all the recycling each week for the same price they get as scrap. They would not have to take the time to deliver it (and you would promise to return their buckets). You cull the brass you want, sell on ebay the other brass that is still good to shoot and sell the rest as scrap metal. You have only your fuel and delivery time invested and could make enough profit/savings to (at least) pay for primers.

Lost Sheep
Good luck.

MikeRussell
February 18, 2012, 05:36 PM
Lost Sheep, they don't allow aluminum or steel on their range at all, so no sorting for them. I do think they might go for me buying a bucket or two of pistol and a bucket or two of rifle brass from them a month, either for the same scrap price or maybe a buck or two more per bucket. I'm going to go there on Monday and see if they're up for it.

skipsan
February 18, 2012, 05:50 PM
The ROs at the public club where I shoot ask the shooter whether he/she is collecting brass and if so, what caliber. The RO will then try to sweep the brass to it's proper owner, PLUS any extra that's dropped by shooters who aren't saving. Downrange brass is "gone" except if you wait until the "right moment" to reach downrange a couple feet with the range broom.

FROGO207
February 18, 2012, 06:27 PM
Our private range WANTS you to police your own brass at least. Take what you want and leave the rest to be sold as recycle brass to fund club activities. All that is ever left is some 30 gallon trash cans full of rimfire brass.:D And it is my turn to take it back to the recyclers for the club this month.
Oh I took a medium flat rate box of used primers I had to the recyclers a week ago and got $43 for it.:D

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