Ruger 10-22 Disappointment


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Plan2Live
February 19, 2012, 11:14 AM
In the fall of 2010, after hearing about the wonderful reputation it enjoyed, I bought my youngest son a Ruger 10-22. Just the standard rifle with the blued barrel and walnut stock. We were immediately disappointed with the factory “iron” sights. Not wanting to go with aftermarket peep sights we opted to attach the factory provided Weaver style scope mount that attaches to the top of the receiver in the pre-tapped mounting holes with the factory screws. I bought a Nikon 3X9 scope and mounted the scope on the Weaver mount with the Nikon provided bases. We headed back out to the range and started zeroing in the scope. At first everything was moving nice and linear. As we were getting close to dialed in, the adjustments started getting non-linear or even moving the point of impact in the opposite direction. A lengthy inspection turned up that the mounting screws for the factory provided Weaver mount were loosening up. Off to the hardware store to buy and apply some Lock-tite. Next range session we got everything dialed in and it became a tack driver.

We don’t get to shoot that often so it was several weeks, maybe a month or two before we went out again. At first everything was just fine then the point of aim started drifting. I tried making some tweaks that again became non-linear and erratic and low and behold, the Nikon mounting bases were walking forward on the Weaver rail. I pulled out the tools, readjusted the bases and cranked down as hard as I dared on the four lock screws. We got the 10-22 dialed back in and had a rather boring but satisfying session of putting round after round into a dime sized hole.

About two months later we went out again. I checked all the lock screws and started shooting. And once again the bases started walking forward after about 100 rounds. Keep in mind that the screws are tight but it still will not grip the groves in the Weaver mount and walks forward. Gave up, went back home. :banghead:

I took the scope off the bases and started looking everything over. I determined there was a lock screw or mounting screw on the front base that could be screwed straight down towards the receiver. Rather than go out and buy Weaver style bases I simply lined this screw up with a slot in the Weaver mount and snugged it against the Weaver mount. My goal was to determine if this would prevent the bases from walking forward and if so, then I might invest in a true Weaver base for the Nikon. We went out, dialed it back in and after about 150 rounds the point of aim started drifting again. I started examining everything and checking for tightness to no avail. I took a firm one handed grip on the scope and wiggled left to right. I had movement. In fact, the entire receiver was wiggling around in the stock. I took out a large screwdriver and found that the main screw securing the receiver to the stock was less than finger tight. I cranked that down and had to readjust the point of aim which was now way off. Just about the time we got it dialed in we ran out of ammo and went home frustrated.

For a rifle with such a wonderful reputation this one sure seems to be a piece of crap. :cuss:

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451 Detonics
February 19, 2012, 11:29 AM
Sounds like to me you are blaming the rifle for things not it's fault. I have never put scope mounts on a rifle without loc-tite, most instructions advised doing so. It has been quite a few years since Ruger used a 22 groove mount with their guns because of the walking issue, whoever sold you the rifle should have suggested a Weaver style scope mount.

As for the action screw loosening...that is just standard maintenance.

tranders
February 19, 2012, 11:50 AM
Must be the bone crushing recoil loosening everything up.:D

On a more serious note, I always put a dab of blue loctite on my scope mounts and haven't had any problems. If the action screw keeps loosening then a little on that screw might be a good idea.
Good luck and hope it works out for you

hardluk1
February 19, 2012, 11:54 AM
I use a weaver base lock-tited down and ole standard weaver ringers. Have those on ever rifle i own but my ruger rifle . Never had any walking,any problems. I TQ mt base to 25inch lbs and rigns to 15inch lbs. Stock is just good snug tight. Play with to to see if it helps or hurts groups size and use something like cci mini mags or stardard atleast for sighting in. Get a tq setting screw driver as they do help.

Steel Horse Rider
February 19, 2012, 12:10 PM
I have never had a problem with the factory sights on my early 1970's 10/22.

sixgunner455
February 19, 2012, 12:11 PM
Always check the action screw before you start shooting. If your groups start to wander, check it again. First thing to check.

Get a different base, if this one isn't working. My 10/22 is quite old, and I have one of the original bases on it, with Leupold Rifleman vertical split rings on it. It has never wandered since the day I mounted it. YMMV.

bigfatdave
February 19, 2012, 12:15 PM
I was going to post, but 451 Detonics said everything I would have.

Your rifle isn't a piece of junk, you're expecting it to function without care or any intervention on your part.

mshootnit
February 19, 2012, 12:18 PM
I don't like the way the 10/22 is bedded in the stock. I don't like the soft receiver aluminum that strips way too easy. The trigger is awful. I don't like the design of the bolt which should have the firing pin confined in its channel, ensuring all movement is forward and never slightly upward. The extractors need an upgrade. Other than that its a decent rifle.

PoserHoser
February 19, 2012, 12:19 PM
Don't blame the gun. anyone who says 10/22's are crap are liars. My fathers has shot over a 5,000 round s without cleaning with no jams and still accurately and it was a plain jane model. so please never blame a gun for your own:confused:
Next time title your thread appropriately and we wont have a problem.

Certaindeaf
February 19, 2012, 12:22 PM
.For a rifle with such a wonderful reputation this one sure seems to be a piece of crap. :cuss:
Many guns have screws and interfaces.

arizona98tj
February 19, 2012, 01:02 PM
IMO, you are blaming the wrong part of the shooter/gun combination.

Just saying.

LTR shooter
February 19, 2012, 01:21 PM
A lengthy inspection turned up that the mounting screws for the factory provided Weaver mount were loosening up. Off to the hardware store to buy and apply some Lock-tite.

Yep , I always use Loc-tite on any scope base , no matter what type of gun , 22 rifle , centerfire rifle or target handguns. Nothing as frustrating as a scope base coming loose in the middle of a range session. But in all honesty can you say this was the fault of the rifle being a 10/22? A friend of mine decided not to use Loc-tite on his Rem Model 700 .22-250 and had a loose base first time out. Not any fault of the rifle.

In fact, the entire receiver was wiggling around in the stock. I took out a large screwdriver and found that the main screw securing the receiver to the stock was less than finger tight.

The screws on on my wood Beeman air rifle stock also come loose. Wood stocks can take on or lose moisture. I had a Sako Finnfire where the stock screws became so tight I could barely loosen them. The "battering" of the bolt against the barrel creates enough vibration to loosen things up. I can understand your frustration but at least you know to check the mounting screw.


Still not sure as to what base you have. My newer 10/22 came with a Weaver style base that could be used with a dovetail ring or Weaver cross slot. If you do not have the Weaver style cross slot ring that might be the way to go.

We got the 10-22 dialed back in and had a rather boring but satisfying session of putting round after round into a dime sized hole.

Next range session we got everything dialed in and it became a tack driver.


At least the rifle is a shooter once you get your scope base issues solved.

Ar180shooter
February 19, 2012, 01:28 PM
Sounds like issues with your selection of mount/rings, and inexperience in scope mounting and maintenance.

red rick
February 19, 2012, 01:50 PM
Have a smith mount the scope if you don't know how. It's not the gun.

wingman
February 19, 2012, 02:15 PM
Operator error along with poor mounting technique. I use Burris signature zee rings with a slotted base and Mueller 4-14 apv scope never had any problems with mounting system, I do recheck stock screw on occasion they will be loose from factory on some, found that to be true with various brands.

Husker_Fan
February 19, 2012, 02:19 PM
I don't like the idea of locktite on the action screw, but I also like to tinker with my 10/22. If that screw is the problem, get a torque driver and properly set it.

natman
February 19, 2012, 02:25 PM
10/22s have plenty of faults, but all the problems you describe are with the scope mounts and rings. You put those on and would have had the same problems with any other rifle.

HKGuns
February 19, 2012, 02:28 PM
Can't see how you are blaming the rifle either. You stated in your post it is a tack driver when you've done the setup correctly. Fix your scope problems or stick with the iron sights.

hardluk1
February 19, 2012, 02:30 PM
No one said to lock-tie action screws i don't think. Scope base heck yes.

wingman
February 19, 2012, 02:40 PM
Operator error along with poor mounting technique. I use Burris signature zee rings with a slotted base and Mueller 4-14 apv scope never had any problems with mounting system, I do recheck stock screw on occasion they will be loose from factory on some, found that to be true with various brands.

husker
February 19, 2012, 03:04 PM
I had a similar problem with a scope walking or moving in the rings. I used a lil double sided tape. Put the tape in the ring halves. Tightened everything down ,& loctited everything. No more probs

http://www.nordisco.com/images/standard/665M.JPG

Omaha-BeenGlockin
February 19, 2012, 03:13 PM
Add me to bad owner column---nothing wrong with the rifle.

Pindarslight
February 19, 2012, 03:27 PM
I think the op gets it or at least should. I love my free 10/22 all weather model. I've already looked at a new thumb hole stock and barrel. First thing I read was don't use the stock mount rail. I have yet to mount a scope but I don't have an issue with my sights as the op described. I agree they aren't the best but I'm going to keep them for awhile. I say don't hate the rifle it's been around forever and a very good one. It's not popular for nothing. Do what's been suggested and take it out for another run.

Jaymo
February 19, 2012, 03:27 PM
I like the 10/22, but it's the most overrated .22 rimfire ever made. Reliable enough, and decently accurate, but nothing to write home about.
Every one of my old Mossberg, Winchester, Marlin, Savage, and Remington rimfires will outshoot my 10/22s by a good margin.
In order to get the 10/22 to run with any of the others, I'd have to spend more money than the gun cost for barrel, trigger, and bedding upgrades.

The 10/22 is a good, fun rimfire, but it's not a great one.
You'd be better off buying your son a Marlin 795 or 60 if you want an accurate, reliable .22 for hunting. They're also lighter and better balanced, and the stock isn't so fat.

Yes, I have a love/hate relationship with the 10/22.
I love it because it's a Ruger.
I hate it because it isn't what it should be, for the current price.

Pindarslight
February 19, 2012, 03:51 PM
I like the 10/22, but it's the most overrated .22 rimfire ever made. Reliable enough, and decently accurate, but nothing to write home about.
Every one of my old Mossberg, Winchester, Marlin, Savage, and Remington rimfires will outshoot my 10/22s by a good margin.
In order to get the 10/22 to run with any of the others, I'd have to spend more money than the gun cost for barrel, trigger, and bedding upgrades.

The 10/22 is a good, fun rimfire, but it's not a great one.
You'd be better off buying your son a Marlin 795 or 60 if you want an accurate, reliable .22 for hunting. They're also lighter and better balanced, and the stock isn't so fat.

Yes, I have a love/hate relationship with the 10/22.
I love it because it's a Ruger.
I hate it because it isn't what it should be, for the current price.


10/22 is just as good for hunting as any other, I respect your opinion but I feel it's way far from accurate representation of the rifle in discussion.I would of never known of the 10/22 if it wasn't for my uncle I hunted 100s of small game without scope. Sure it isn't sniper rifle quality, but I find it a really excellent rimfire. Mine is accurate with stock sights maybe its just me:what:

airedaleman
February 19, 2012, 09:49 PM
I have a 10/22 that I bought for my father for Christmas of 1965. Still have the box, all the papers, and the little "short order cook" sales slip carbon from Meltzer's in Garfield, NJ. - $48.50! He appreciated the thought, but never liked the rifle. A year or two after he got the rifle, I put a 6X Stoeger scope with a 1" tube on it. He carried back and forth to our camp in the Catskills, but I doubt if he put 5 boxes of cartridges through it. He died in '75 and I got the rifle. I don't paticularly care for it either, and it sits in the cabinet. My grand kids will shoot it from time to time, but that's about it. My No. 1's on the other hand...

CraigC
February 20, 2012, 11:28 AM
I like the 10/22, but it's the most overrated .22 rimfire ever made.
Not hardly. It was designed as a plinker. A run of the mill .22LR rifle as a rimfire counterpart to the .44 carbine. Its design affords very easy and very economical modifications to make the old plinker anything its owner wants it to be. Name another rimfire rifle that can be built into anything with an allen wrench and a screwdriver??? Even the AR requires specialized tools and a headspace gauge to change the barrel.


Every one of my old Mossberg, Winchester, Marlin, Savage, and Remington rimfires will outshoot my 10/22s by a good margin.
That may or may not be debatable. No doubt the Ruger is not the most accurate rimfire on the market. It was never intended to be.


In order to get the 10/22 to run with any of the others, I'd have to spend more money than the gun cost for barrel, trigger, and bedding upgrades.
Money spent correctly will yield a very accurate rifle that shoots better than any other factory automatic and on par with many bolt guns. $40 gets you a crisp, 2-3lb trigger. Name another rifle that can have that for $40, on the kitchen table with hand tools. Name another .22 rifle that you can install a match grade barrel into with nothing more than an allen wrench and have your $200 plinker shooting bugholes. Name another .22 rifle that an aftermarket company would even bother producing a $300 all CNC machined 14oz trigger for.


The 10/22 is a good, fun rimfire, but it's not a great one.
Millions of 10/22 owners would probably disagree.


You'd be better off buying your son a Marlin 795 or 60 if you want an accurate, reliable .22 for hunting.
That's certainly an option. As one who cut his teeth with a Marlin 60, the Ruger is a better-made rifle out of the box. Even if Marlins do tend to be a little more accurate.


They're also lighter...
This is just untrue. Both range from 5-6lbs, except the target models. The little 16" 10/22FS and youth models are 4.3-4.5lbs. That's light!


...and better balanced, and the stock isn't so fat.
That's debatable. A 10/22 carbine balances right at the magazine. Which holds ten rounds and fits flush with the stock. Most other guns offer a 5-7rd magazine that protrudes. Which is fine, I have several like that. But you can't hold the fat stock against the Ruger and not mention the protruding magazines of lesser capacity of most other rifles. Ain't no free lunches.


I hate it because it isn't what it should be, for the current price.
Then don't buy one. Apparently lots of folks believe they are a good value. Otherwise Ruger would not have produced them in such quantities over the last 48yrs. Nor would they be constantly adding new configurations and variations.

SlamFire1
February 20, 2012, 12:08 PM
I called Ruger and talked about the 10/22's. Look at the price point and to whom they are selling the things.

The chambers are huge, these are not match rifles. I took a .22LR round, placed it in the chamber and rocked the round by pressing on the rim. My Stevens M416 the bullet is engraved in the rifling, but that is a target rifle.

I put a Volquartsen barrel on my 10/22 and found I had to shoot the round out: it was too tight to extract. But the accuracy was much better.

Triggers suck and you have to buy an aftermarket trigger group for a match trigger because Ruger tolerances are so wide.

But, there are lots of people who never clean their rifles, can't shoot within the capability of match ammunition, and are perfectly happy can busting with their 10/22's.

You want a real precision rimfire? , go buy an Anschutz ANS 1710 22LR Classic Heavy Barrel 5 Round without Sights for $2000. Or if you want to win the National Championships a M2013 Super Match for $3,700 http://www.champchoice.com/prod-__NEW___ANS_2013_IN_2018_ALUM_STOCK_PRECISE,_690mm__LG_GRIP__RIGHT_-3666.aspx If you can't win the National Champships with a 2013 than you are not trying hard enough!

jjc0341
February 20, 2012, 02:07 PM
Pretty much everything has been said at least once here. Try looking around at 10/22 tweaking posts. I understand your frustration(multiple bolt and gas guns built) but making the weapon work for you is part of the fun:)

NeuseRvrRat
February 20, 2012, 03:45 PM
DNZ Products makes a one-piece mount with integral rings for the 10/22. impossible for those rings to walk. use a little blue loctite when you mount the scope and i doubt you'll have any issues. it's lightweight and american made.

Old Dog Man
February 21, 2012, 01:02 AM
Sounds like the base is the problem to me also, but I have found some of the barrels are loose in the action. Take the screws out of the wedge under the barrel, if you can pull the barrel out by hand it's too loose. Iv'e knurlled the barrel fit to tighten it where it has to be tapped in with a block of wood and that solved the accury problem, should that be the case. Al

Clipper
February 21, 2012, 12:22 PM
Your terminology is confusing because I think you're interchanging scope rings with scope base...But if your rings have the set screw that contacts the base, it's a system that needs extra stuff to properly engage the base...Probably to offset some lack in the ring's ability to fit the notches in the base. Get a set of Weaver rings to mount on your Weaver base. They're made to work together.

jrdolall
February 21, 2012, 12:36 PM
I bought a new 10/22 this past weekend at Wallyworld for $197 plus tax. I have an older model 10/22 that I have killed umpteen squirrels with but it has a 3x9 scope on it and I want my kids to feel comfortable shooting iron sights. Off a sandbag I can drill 2" patterns at 50 yards with the occasional flyer using the new gun and iron sights. I am old and cant see worth a darn so 2" is pretty good for me. We shot a total of around 1100 rounds this weekend using several .22s at different ranges. The new 10/22 jammed once on the 3rd 10 round magazine but never jammed again including several rounds with the 25 round mag I already had. I have several .22s in bolt, single and semi and the 10/22s are as accurate as any.

stillkickin
February 23, 2012, 11:41 PM
sounds like a loose nut behind the stock

mshootnit
February 23, 2012, 11:52 PM
its a decent design for a cheap gun and its made as cheaply as possible. that's what you should expect.

JR47
February 24, 2012, 10:30 PM
Why is it that some people just cannot accept the facts? The 10/22 represents probably the best value in a .22 rifle today. We have a few, the oldest being mine from 1972 or 1973. The gun has literally tens of thousands of rounds through it.

Now, I also own a Marlin 795, a Marlin 60, a Stevens 987, and a host of older, no longer produced, Mossberg, Marlin, Winchester, Browning, and Remington .22 rifles. To me, the 10/22 is easily as accurate as they are. It's also more reliable than a number of other 1970-era guns that I own.

Most people want a fun .22 rifle. They plink with it, maybe hunt with it, and teach others with it. Why would anyone in their right minds spend hundreds of dollars more to do the same thing? A balloon, sitting at 100 yards isn't going to reflect 1/2 MOA accuracy. :)

Captain Willard
February 25, 2012, 02:57 PM
I took out a large screwdriver and found that the main screw securing the receiver to the stock was less than finger tight.

We have had the identical problem, but I view it as pure enjoyment in problem solving. It is possible the bolt worked loose after several outings?

Locktite plus a field strip and cleaning after each outing did the trick for us. Frequent cleaning is a good idea for the the rifle's well being as well as my own mechanical experience.

I am curious about something you wrote: Bored by shooting multiple rounds through a dime hole, but annoyed by a loss of precision. I avoid both of these extremes in life and have a lot of fun with whatever happens.

I love the 10/22- and we are not even done sighting-in yet! The learning curve is enjoyment in itself.

solman
February 25, 2012, 11:12 PM
Plus one for the 10-22. I bought one a while ago and took it to the range with my son. it took a little time to get it dialed in but it was all good.
Once you get the scope problem solved and resolve some of the teething pains of new rifle you will find it's a good shooter and lots of fun. Also some bonding time of father and son at the range.

Ky Larry
February 26, 2012, 08:06 AM
I no longer own a 10/22 but I've found the following steps helpful when mounting scopes:
1.Scrap all slotted head screws and replace them with Torx or Allen heads.

2. Use brake cleaner to remove all oil/lube from screws and threaded holes.

3. Use removeable blue Loctite on base screws.

4. Let Loctite set overnight before mounting scope.

5. Use double sided tape inside scope rings.

6. Tighten scope rings with a torque wrench to 20 inch/pounds.

I carry my torque wrench in my range bag and check ring screws and action screws before every range session. Every one of my 5 CZ rimfires has a differernt torque setting on the action screws. I'm sure the also 10/22s have an accuracy sweet spot for the action screws torque setting. You'll have to experiment to find it. This may seem a little anal but I've found consistancy equals accuracy. YMMV. Good luck.

JR47
February 26, 2012, 01:40 PM
Those points are standard for just about any gun with a scope. I usually check screw tightness every cleaning, after I'm done.

Out latest Ruger 10/22 came with a true Weaver base in the box. If you have a Weaver base, it's not necessarily going to fit a dovetail ring mount properly. Weaver bases, oddly enough, are meant to be used with, dare I say it, Weaver style rings. :)

henrywalker
February 28, 2012, 05:47 PM
hi I'm in the uk & own a 3 year old ruger 10/22 with green mountain stainless fluted barrel
& laminated thumbhole stock! there is slight movement of the barrel/receiver relative to the stock approx 1mm at rear of the receiver! the screw "stock to receiver" is tight!
is this movement normal please?

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