Using Tru Oil - Help


PDA






chocdog
February 21, 2012, 08:39 PM
I am currently refinishing the stock on a old winchester 94.
I am using tru oil and I am trying to get that last perfect finish coat.
It never fails, just when I think I am ready for the sheen and polish I see fine ridges left. :banghead:
I have followed the directions....thin sparse coat etc.
My question is, will the sheen polish knock down the ridges and/or should I use
#0000 steel wool prior to the polish. This is the first time I have used tru oil and I do love how it brings out the grain.

Any advise would be appreciated.:)

If you enjoyed reading about "Using Tru Oil - Help" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
kbbailey
February 21, 2012, 08:59 PM
Steel wool prior to finish. The better it is before, the better it will turn out later.

Do several coats, making certain that it is DRY before using steel wool. Apply with your fingers and rub, rub, rub. The more coats, the better.

If you do enough coats, steel wool between, it will look like glass. Not a fast process though. No shortcuts.

This is what has worked for me. It sometimes takes 3 wks or more to do a stock.

rcmodel
February 21, 2012, 09:01 PM
If you are getting ridges, you are using way too much Tru-Oil.

Put just a drop on your finger and rub it in with your palm until it is all gone.
Repeat as necessary until the grain is filled.

You can then wet block sand until there is nothing left to indicate any wood grain, or finish streaks in the Tru-Oil.

Then rub out the finish using automotive rubbing compound of various grades until it knocks your eye out, it thats what you want. Myself, that shiny a 94 stock would look pretty bad though.

Steel wool in your hand will just conform to the whoopee-doos, and you will still have shiny whoopee-doos when you get done with the rubbing compound.

rc

GunnyUSMC
February 22, 2012, 08:51 AM
I like Tru-Oil on some stocks, but don't like the super shiny finish.
I like to do a wac buff, 0000 steel wool and paste wax, after the final coat.
It gives that simigloss look with the depth.
Tru-Oil finish with a wax buff on the stock.
http://i56.tinypic.com/2rmpeuh.jpg
http://i55.tinypic.com/t890yr.jpg
http://i52.tinypic.com/10wqry9.jpg

jblackfish
February 22, 2012, 11:22 AM
Steel wool prior to finish. The better it is before, the better it will turn out later.

Do several coats, making certain that it is DRY before using steel wool. Apply with your fingers and rub, rub, rub. The more coats, the better.

If you do enough coats, steel wool between, it will look like glass. Not a fast process though. No shortcuts.

This is what has worked for me. It sometimes takes 3 wks or more to do a stock.
+1 That's been exactly my experience! I done it wrong and I've done it right and kbbaily's advice is perfect. Also, as rcmodel implied, it's SO easy to use too much - I think we all start out using too much and learn that from a "problem-matic" refinish job.

788Ham
February 22, 2012, 12:25 PM
What make and model is that little rifle Gunny? It looks like a Remington, if its a model #33, I have one identical to it. Beautiful job I might add!

chocdog
February 22, 2012, 12:49 PM
Thanks all for the advice. I love this site.
As far as the ridges I was talking about I think they came from overworking the oil. It started to dry out a bit.
RC you're right, the excessive shine does not fit the gun. Any suggestions to minimize the high gloss.
My goal for this project has been to get the gun as close to the day my gramps bought it back in 1911.
During the life of the gun, and his utilitarian way of life, he actucally painted the metal to cover the faded
bluing and pitting. He also had put some crazy stain/finish on the stock. I have completely broke down the gun,
stripped the stocks, de-blued everything, removed all the rust (the pits were rough) sanded and polish all parts
to 600 grit then reblued it all. All in all, I am actually pleased with the results of using Oxpho Blue. I know a hot
blue would have been better, but my project budget was tight and since he had already diminished the collector
value I just want the gun to be closer its original state. I'll post some pics when done. Again thanks for the advice!

GunnyUSMC
February 22, 2012, 03:16 PM
788Ham
It's a BRNO ZKM 468 "Garden Rifle single shot 22.

Not to hijack this thread I will do a post on the little rifle in the rifle section.

Zeke/PA
February 23, 2012, 09:55 AM
I really love the results that one can get using Tru-Oil.
I've found that applying the oil with fingers works best for me.
I let the oil dry at least 24 hours before the next application.
About every second coat whern ther is no tackiness present I go over the wood with 000 steel wool.
If you prefer a duller finish, a light going over the final coat with the fine steel wool is the ticket.

pdogkilr
February 23, 2012, 10:17 AM
I've only used Tru-Oil once. I refinished the "hardwood" stock on a Remington 788 (30-30) I bought at the PX for $67 back in '70. I put a black decelerator pad on it, used Brownell's kit to glass bed it (wanted to see if I could do it right), used their barrel channel inletting tool to open up the channel a little so the barrel would free-float.

Like everyone has said - NO short-cuts. It took a couple of weeks, but the rifle ended up looking like it had real wood for a stock and not just a plank. I was/am very pleased with the way the Tru-Oil worked for me.

MM44
February 25, 2012, 09:40 PM
Tru-Oil does tend to shrink some. Sometime sanding scratches can re-appear after time, when you could have sworn the piece was sanded absolutely smooth.

If you have the patience use the Tru-Oil like the others have suggested and build up several thin coats, probably using more coats than you think you may need. Then put the peice up or go ahead and use it as is for about six months before the final finish sanding and buffing.
This will alow for shrinkage of the finish.
The final buffing, wax stage will determine the gloss. I like the satin smooth feel you can acomplish with the Tru-Oil.

If you enjoyed reading about "Using Tru Oil - Help" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!