Can you drill a receiver for a scope with a handheld dill?


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mookiie
February 22, 2012, 11:58 PM
My question is to instal a scope mount have you ever used a handheld drill, or is a drill press always required for this type of work?

I have a scope mount for an SKS receiver I am thinking about drilling and tapping. I am wondering if a vse and a handheld drill will work or if I should just hold off on that project until I can get a drill press?

Also any helpful info for drilling and taping a newbie should know.

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kd7nqb
February 23, 2012, 12:06 AM
You CAN but I would not suggest it not only do you need the hole straight but depth is important. I have the same issue with my Mosin gun smiths want $75 per hole to drill and tap it I only paid 69 for the gun so its been tempting. But as of yet I have not.

Ask around im willing to bet a buddy of yours has a press you can use.

BBBBill
February 23, 2012, 12:12 AM
Use a mill when available. They are better than a drill press. Never try it with a drill. There is no way to control your depth. Really good way to put a "pressure relief port" right into the chamber. :uhoh: :scrutiny:

KW84
February 23, 2012, 12:27 AM
If you are going to try it start small. Use a punch and a small bit first, because it is easier to get started with a small bit and then follow with increasing sizes after. Measure twice drill once.

Zeke/PA
February 23, 2012, 09:44 AM
NOT a good idea!
The risk is fowling up a rifle beyond repair.
$75.00/hole is a bit steep though.
If you have a Machinist/Toolmaker friend the task is a relitively easy one.
Wish you lived closer, I'd do the job at no charge and if the timing was right you'd go home with a carload of fresh vegetables to boot.

MrDig
February 23, 2012, 11:45 AM
Don't do it. Either shop around for a less expensive smith or go spend the money you would have spent on the smith for table top drill press.
I have tried it with stocks and know from experience that you will ultimately be unhappy with the results. The wood can be more forgiving and you can always replace it.
The Metal on a receiver once compromised make the gun junk.

jimmyraythomason
February 23, 2012, 12:12 PM
Only if your eye is laser accurate and your muscle control is rock solid.

earplug
February 23, 2012, 12:30 PM
I bought a decent drill press at a pawn shop about six years ago.
Easy to rig up a depth stop and decent vices are available.
A bench size drill press and a decent vice will pay for itself in one or two projects.

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 12:45 PM
Thanks for the input I will have to start putting away funds to get the Drill press and press clamps I am going to need to do the job correctly.

sugarmaker
February 23, 2012, 12:51 PM
Short answer - NO. Bubba may disagree but I've seem some awful butcher jobs with crooked bases, screws, JB weld, and what have you from poor setups and not knowing what to expect drilling a non-flat hard steel surface. A secure, non jury-rigged way to mount the gun and true it up to the drill, a way to ensure the holes go in square (either a drill bushing fixture for free hand or a carbide stub on a vertical mill) and a way to stop the hole in a controlled way (like a DRO on a vertical mill or a stop bushing with a hand drill. Just doing it free hand using the base as a drill guide is likely to make a mess.

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 01:03 PM
what other equipment besides a drill press would I need?
Sugarmaker - why do you need bushings to ensure the whole is square - is that if you do not use a drill press or do you still need bushings even if you are using a drill press?

jimmyraythomason
February 23, 2012, 01:13 PM
do you still need bushings even if you are using a drill pressAbsolutely YES! Here is my set-up. A Forester jig with the proper bushing for the various drill bit and tap sizes.

rcmodel
February 23, 2012, 01:17 PM
Be sure and practice on something besides a rifle when you do it.

Those little thread taps are brittle as glass and harder then woodpecker lips.
And when you break one off in a rifle receiver, which you will with no experiance?

You will think the gunsmith charge for doing it right was cheap enough, for sure!

rc

jimmyraythomason
February 23, 2012, 01:22 PM
RC,my one experience with a broken tap (back in the late 1970s) was enough for a lifetime! As many receivers as I have D&Ted,I haven't broken a tap since because of that one experience. Do it once and you'll NEVER hurry a tap job again!

T Bran
February 23, 2012, 01:24 PM
RC
You truly have a way with words and are spot on as usual.
T

somoss
February 23, 2012, 01:38 PM
from the couple of SKS's i have seen there is no problem with over penetration. i guess depends on where you are mounting the scope base. if it is on the side (just left of the spring cover) then why cant he drill thru all the way? with a drill press should be do-able, and doing the tap is hard but with practice also doable.
On a $100 - $200 SKS i would go for it. on a Nagant even a free one, no way. too easy to make a vent hole.

1911 guy
February 23, 2012, 01:45 PM
Sure, you can drill it with a handheld. You can also jaywalk in front of a cement truck. Both are possible, neither is a good idea.

For the cost of a machine and fixturing, I'd pay a gunsmith to do it. I admit to doing my own and some for friends, but I happen to be a machinist who spends between ten and twelve hours a day in a machine shop.

If you're going to get a tabletop machine, I'd seriously recommend a mill rather than a drill. You can do milling, drill and tapping with the mill, but drilling only with a drill. The spindle on most inexpensive drills is hardly free of runout. A mill will have much less. Usually within .0005 for a home model. A drill? Youd be lucky to get within .002. Runout in a tap that small will shatter them VERY easily.

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 01:57 PM
1911 guy, a mill would be nice, however, a drill press is like a 100 bucks mills seem to run in the thousands, so if I want to complete this project in my lifetime I am probably going to use a drill press.

JRH6856
February 23, 2012, 02:13 PM
1911 guy, a mill would be nice, however, a drill press is like a 100 bucks mills seem to run in the thousands, so if I want to complete this project in my lifetime I am probably going to use a drill press.

There's always Harbor Freight. (http://www.harborfreight.com/two-speed-variable-bench-mill-drill-machine-44991.html)

Zeke/PA
February 23, 2012, 05:19 PM
mookie,
Be certain of your mount installation.
Is a bolt alteration needed ?
There are SEVERAL options available that do not require drilling and tapping.
I would do some online research before drillling any holes.
Check out S&K Mounts website.

hogrdr
February 23, 2012, 05:25 PM
i have tried such things before and they NEVER turn out good.

Zeke/PA
February 23, 2012, 05:39 PM
WHOOPS!
The rifle in question is an SKS !
My Bad!
BUT, S&K's website shows a mount for an SKS.

sugarmaker
February 23, 2012, 05:51 PM
"Sugarmaker - why do you need bushings to ensure the whole is square - is that if you do not use a drill press or do you still need bushings even if you are using a drill press?"

Yes, the drill will wander and it may (in fact it almost is gauranteed to with a small drill) start the hole offset from the spindle axis. When that happens at the very least the hole will be angled and not in the right location (maybe only a little, maybe not) and at the very worst the drill can break (though that's not likely as you're not drilling very deeply). The bushing supports the drill, keeps the drill where you want it and does not allow it to wander. I'm spoiled by a very well equipped machine shop, lots of tooling, raw stock, and a supportive employer so i haven't used the fixtures others have posted but they look like a pretty effective way of getting reasonable results from a regular drill press. Also tapping steel using small taps without support (either a bushing or using a machine spindle manually turned) is tricky, easy to get started crooked or snap the tap.

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 06:06 PM
Sugar maker- I was asking if bushings are necassary if you are using a drill press?

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 06:09 PM
Zeke - I ordered the s k scope mount for the sks I will try that for now. But I am still considering trying to drill and tap for the other mount I purchased.

sugarmaker
February 23, 2012, 06:23 PM
It depends. Small dia high speed steel drills, standard length, like to wander, even in a drill press. It's also difficult to locate the holes relative to one another as most drill presses don't have an XY table. If the surface is the least bit rounded or angled, it's going to be hard to get a good spot. Scope bases are relatively unforgiving of mis-located, poorly threaded, or angled holes. Drilling holes in guns is actually rather hard to do well without a good setup as guns have lots of curved and irregular surfaces and the precision requirements are pretty high. It's not impossible, just be prepared for what might happen.

Clark
February 23, 2012, 10:18 PM
They drilled and tapped into my jaw for a Titanium screw yesterday.

That was a hand drill.

JRH6856
February 23, 2012, 10:28 PM
They drilled and tapped into my jaw for a Titanium screw yesterday.

That was a hand drill.

Seems like a strange place for a scope mount.

BBBBill
February 23, 2012, 10:52 PM
They drilled and tapped into my jaw for a Titanium screw yesterday.

That was a hand drill.

Seems like a strange place for a scope mount.

They were putting a receiver sight on the side.

mookiie
February 23, 2012, 11:52 PM
sugarmaker - i will post some pictures later, i can show you the side of the receiver but the mount and drill press/vice have not arrived yet. It seems flat. But it should look like this when it is done:
http://i1246.photobucket.com/albums/gg605/Mookiie2005/SKS%20Project/skschoateexample.jpg -note not my picture found on google.

As you can see from the above the sks reciever i need to drill is flat. I am more worried about, drilling through the side to make sure it does not interfere with the bolt. The above is approximately what I am looking for in my final result.

Fleet
February 24, 2012, 12:59 AM
If you think that the charge to drill/tap correctly is expensive, wait till you see the charge for fixing what you've managed to screw up. Assuming that it's fixable at all, and you haven't just created 2 or 3 hundred dollars worth of scrap metal.

Trying to do this with a hand drill is silly. Trying to do it with a drill press and not using an appropriate drilling fixture (like the Forster) is no better.

$75/hole is extreme. Find a cheaper smith, and let them handle it. You have neither the tools nor the experience for this.

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 01:43 AM
Fleet - the Forster fixture you mention actually appears to be a jig for drilling a rounded receiver aka a bolt action receiver, i am trying to recreate the picture above the sks has a square receiver, the Forster jig will do me no more good than a bench top clamp.

Tomcat47
February 24, 2012, 02:33 AM
If you are not familiar with metalworking, it may be best to go to a shop!

@ jimmyray....nice set up! drill bushings are the way to go!

However, if you are mechanically inclined..there is a good deal of info on this thread to probably gat a scope on your gun! :)

(test pieces,test pieces,test pieces...when your comfy...drill it!)

There are a few things that could help in a pinch if you had to go that way tho!
Grizzly sales these little split rings for $6.95....the smallest one will still fit a #32 #33 drill bit which is used on most scope mounts 6-40 (#33 drill) This will keep your depth in check, but put piece of tape on bottom to protect finish.

A drill press would still be best for proper alignment.

If you get in position to acquire you a drill press, below is a suggestion that is a little more expensive, but not like a milling machine in the thousands $$$, and much better than a drill press. A very handy machine for smith work indeed. It is a Jet Hobby Mill at just under $700.00 at your local Northern Tool Dist.

Clark
February 24, 2012, 01:08 PM
Mookiie,
We need more pics for you to find on Google images.

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 02:56 PM
Got in touch with a local gunsmith he charges 40 dollars a hole, 160 total for this mount job, so I am weighing that against the fact that the rifle cost 225 originally.

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 02:59 PM
The problems with Gunsmiths in the Northeastern US - Especially in Delaware, being a small state, have very few Gunsmiths as options, they tend to charge more than average because of the shortage of qualified individuals. And it is hard to find a good one just because they are so few, and they don't see as much, or as varied work requests. For instance in DE you can only hunt with shotguns, so I imagine he gets more jobs with shotguns and pistol sight jobs for the self defense market.

jimmyraythomason
February 24, 2012, 03:01 PM
While the forster drilling gig I have is pictured set up for rounded receivers it can be used on square receivers as well as for drilling barrels for open sights. If this one rifle is ALL you will ever need drilled,it isn't worth the expense compared to having it professionally done.

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 03:49 PM
I am leaning towards letting the gunsmith do the work and just work on my drilling and taping technique on scrap metal until I get confident in my technique. Than maybe I will be skilled enough to do the next drill and tap project I come up with.

Zeke/PA
February 24, 2012, 05:12 PM
i am leaning towards letting the gunsmith do the work and just work on my drilling and taping technique on scrap metal until i get confident in my technique. Than maybe i will be skilled enough to do the next drill and tap project i come up with.

Horray!!

Zeke/PA
February 24, 2012, 05:38 PM
Got in touch with a local gunsmith he charges 40 dollars a hole, 160 total for this mount job, so I am weighing that against the fact that the rifle cost 225 originally.

40 Dollars a hole??
When I had an FFL years ago I charged 3 bucks a hole.
Oh well, Back then Gas was only 30 cents a gallon.
BUT, 40 a hole IS preposterous!

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 07:03 PM
Well Zeke if you can do it for less I would be glad to come see you! :)

MrDig
February 24, 2012, 07:12 PM
Fleet: "If you think that the charge to drill/tap correctly is expensive, wait till you see the charge for fixing what you've managed to screw up. Assuming that it's fixable at all, and you haven't just created 2 or 3 hundred dollars worth of scrap metal."

Bravo

Zeke/PA
February 24, 2012, 07:24 PM
Well Zeke if you can do it for less I would be glad to come see you! :)

Mookie,
You have my PM's, I CAN accomidate you BUT I will also ATTEMPT to talk you out of doing anything foolish.

CZguy
February 24, 2012, 08:01 PM
I have a scope mount for an SKS receiver I am thinking about drilling and tapping.

Just a thought, but a scope on a SKS isn't really necessary. I agree that the iron sights that they come with aren't very good, but you might consider a set of Tech Sights.

http://www.tech-sights.com/sks.htm

mookiie
February 24, 2012, 08:37 PM
CZguy - I already have a Williams rear sight that is fine I do not need the tech sights at ths time as the Williams is fine for iron sights, But wanted a seperate optics option above since this mount allows iron sighting. Thanks for the info though.

sugarmaker
February 24, 2012, 09:58 PM
Ouch...$40 a hole... 2 hours of shop time. i guess if i had to make a fixture or arrange the clamps and shims, true the mill to the surface etc., and determine the line of the scope relative to the rifle bore and determine the drill line so you're not at full adjustment just to come into zero, maybe. Add extra precautions so nothing gets bent or marred I guess I'd probably have 2 hours into it the first time if it's a difficult shape. Note I am NOT a gunsmith nor do I claim to be but I do like working on my own stuff and a few items for friends. If you like this sort of thing and have the right tools it is kind of satisfying to do a job like this the right way and know how to do it again. The mistake is to start without the right tools not knowing what to expect and then get into a mess trying to back up and correct things that went wrong. That's no fun.

Zeke/PA
February 25, 2012, 05:59 PM
Well, we haven't even talked about taps.
How many guys have a 6x48 tap in their arsenal ?
How many guys can determine the size tap required with the available mount?
Remember THIS, daily we deal with stuff made elsewhere (metric)
Sure, we can make substitions BUT screw head dimensions /mount mean something.
I cannot say it enough, there are mounts available for your Mil-Surp rifle,save yourself heartache and a LOT of money and go by what is available

jimmyraythomason
February 25, 2012, 06:01 PM
How many guys have a 6x48 tap in their arsenal ?I have several as well as 8x40 taps. I didn't get them at a hardware store though!! That is a very good point! Taps needed will be gun specific,both starting and bottoming taps(for blind holes). Tha good ones aint cheap!

Zeke/PA
February 25, 2012, 06:13 PM
jimmyrae,,,
I am always open to an intellegent conversation.
PM me.

CZguy
February 25, 2012, 06:33 PM
Just like jimmyraythomason, I have several 6x48 taps, and I'm an Aircraft Mechanic with forty years experience. Drilling holes in a receiver is not the place to practice.

Zeke/PA is absolutely correct.....and I hope the original poster PMs him.

mookiie
February 25, 2012, 06:36 PM
The problem with currently avaliable sks mounts is that they have to be removed to properly clean the rifle and lose their zero everytime. That is why i am exploring a drilled and tapped option. If everyone who wanted to do something was talked out of learning how to do something nothing would get done! I wish people would stop telling me what idea it is and instead provide tangable advice to actually drill.and tap something!!! If you just want to say how hard it is move on to the next topic.

jimmyraythomason
February 25, 2012, 06:42 PM
Okay Mookie,good luck on your project.

brickeyee
February 25, 2012, 07:09 PM
Yes, the drill will wander and it may (in fact it almost is gauranteed to with a small drill) start the hole offset from the spindle axis.

That is why you spot the hole (especially on a curved surface) with a centering drill bit first.

The very short stiff tip prevents wander.

CZguy
February 25, 2012, 11:42 PM
I wish people would stop telling me what idea it is and instead provide tangable advice to actually drill.and tap something!!! If you just want to say how hard it is move on to the next topic.

Let me just say that in my experience some projects are best not to attempt at the entry level.

OK............I'll move along.

Fleet
February 26, 2012, 12:46 AM
That is why i am exploring a drilled and tapped option. If everyone who wanted to do something was talked out of learning how to do something nothing would get done! I wish people would stop telling me what idea it is and instead provide tangable advice to actually drill.and tap something!!! If you just want to say how hard it is move on to the next topic.
No one has any objection with you learning how to do something. It's your methodology that's the problem. THIS CAN'T BE DONE PROPERLY IF YOU DON'T HAVE THE CORRECT TOOLS. The proper tools will cost a good bit more than the gun did. A drill press is NOT the proper tool without a jig to target the receiver - you will create a piece of scrap steel by trying to do it this way. There are NO good shortcuts here!

Is that plain enough?

You come and ask a question, don't like the answers, and then want to argue about it when you get answers from people that DO know how this needs to be done to prevent that from happening.

Clark
February 26, 2012, 03:52 PM
mookiie,
You have me posting on two forums on this. No wonder I get confused
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4976433#post4976433

I have drilled and tapped a lot of different guns.
It seems like an easy task, but hard to explain.

The holes in the mount have a size. The screws that came with the mount have a size. The differnece between the two is the clearance, which is how much error you can have in hole placement.

But... if the holes do not line up, you could round file or drill out a hole in the mount to be bigger, until it fits.

But... if the holes line up, but the scope does not line up with the point of impact, you have more troubles than ever. Swiss cheese is what we call drilling lots of holes because some did not work out.

I have bought a lot of half sporterized Mausers that the problem was the sights would never line up with the point of impact. I look at those rifles for parts.

mookiie
February 26, 2012, 05:58 PM
Clark sorry about that.
For the time being I plan to practice, my drilling and tapping technique. Can you recommend any material at a hardware store that is close to receiver steel? I have a Drill bit number 28 and tap 8-40 so I believe I am fine as these should match the mount screws. I had planned to use a laser bore sighter and clamp the mount and scope to the receiver and try and line up on laser bore sighter point of impact. Could you recommend any other ways? Again I am dealing with a flat rectangular receiver with the sks so this is possible I believe. Also many people have mentioned breaking the tap, if I do 1 turn clockwise and a 1/4 turn counterclockwise would that be the best method to ensure I do not break the tap?
Thanks,
Sean

mookiie
February 26, 2012, 06:02 PM
Fleet - I am asking how to drill and tap a piece of steel. - not the sks reciever I HAVE ALREADY SAID A GUNSMITH WILL BE HANDLING THE SKS - so either read the whole posting or do not post! You keep telling me not to drill the reciever and I have already posted three or four times I will not! So just READ than type for ONCE!

Zeke/PA
February 26, 2012, 06:25 PM
Mookie,
The main thing when tapping is to get the tap started STRAIGHT!
Use a tap wrench, and cutting oil.
Take a turn or two then back up. (this should break the chip).
Practice drilling and tapping blind holes using starter taps and bottom taps.
Have Fun !!

mookiie
February 26, 2012, 06:31 PM
Zekepa I have a tap wrench and the oil but am not familiar with starter taps/bottom taps could you explain a little?

Someone had said that after they drill the hole they put the tap in the chuck and manually turn, in a drill press, would this be a good idea if you have squared the drill head already?

blindhog1964
February 26, 2012, 08:25 PM
I'm glad this thread was started. I'm fixing to attempt this same procedure using the same mount. This is the plan I have come up with. According to the instructions the mount is to be located 1.5 inches from the rear of the receiver and at a height so that removal of the top cover is possible. After locating these points and marking them on the receiver , I will remove the top cover and clamp the mount in place. The best way to make sure that the mount is level with the bore axis ,that I can think of , is to insert a range rod or indicator rod into the muzzle and place a level on this rod. Then level the receiver off of this. Once the rod and receiver are level I can then level the mount,making sure that I'm at or above the mark made earlier when determining top cover clearance. At this point the bore axis and the scope mount should be level with each other. With the mount clamped to the receiver I will then use a transfer punch of the correct size and center punch the holes. A center drill will then be used to start the holes on my drill press while using the mount as a template. The through holes will be drilled by starting with a smaller bit and increasing in size until desired dia. is achieved. The holes will be tapped using the drill press by inserting the tap in the chuck and turning by hand . Cutting fluid will be used generously for drilling and tapping. Also when tapping , turn the tap .25 to .5 turn and then turn back .
This may not be the correct way to do this operation but it is the best solution I have come up with.
PS I'm not a gunsmith.

The
HOG

Zeke/PA
February 26, 2012, 09:04 PM
Zekepa I have a tap wrench and the oil but am not familiar with starter taps/bottom taps could you explain a little?

Someone had said that after they drill the hole they put the tap in the chuck and manually turn, in a drill press, would this be a good idea if you have squared the drill head already?

The tap in drill chuck idea is inviting disaster especially with the smaller size taps being discussed.
Look at the top of your tap wrench for a small angled hole.
This hole will accomidate a small 60 degree center which you can chuck up in the drill press to keep the tap/tap wrench straight ASSUMING that nothing moves laterally after you drill the hole.
Usually a starting tap has some taper to it, a bottom tap is full diameter to the business end.

esque
February 26, 2012, 09:16 PM
blindhog1964,
The top of the SKS receiver is parallel to the
bore, if the receiver is level and the
mount is level you should be good to go.
The height requirement and 1.5" from the
rear is needed for bolt carrier and bolt removal.
I used the same drill press method for tapping
and it works quite well.
I did not use smaller bits because the receiver material
is hardened and the smaller bits break easily.
Good luck with your project.

Zeke/PA
February 26, 2012, 09:18 PM
Mookie,
I just thought of an available tap wrench that incorporates a 1/4" dowel pin that you chuck, an correspondind hole in the wrench making the set up "free floating"in the vertical direction.

mookiie
February 27, 2012, 05:11 PM
Zeke do you know where a tap wrench like that could be found? I checked on Midwayusa.com but did not see it. What should I search for? Do you know a brand name?

Thanks

rcmodel
February 27, 2012, 05:17 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/109419/b-square-tru-tapper-tap-guide-for-use-with-drill-press-or-lathe

rc

Zeke/PA
February 27, 2012, 07:52 PM
Check out the Midway offering by clicking on the link.
$54.00 and change is steep.
Do you have any Machinist/toolmaker friends?

bobsmith
February 27, 2012, 07:56 PM
I've done some sight mounting recently using a 17" drill press. Before even deciding to use the drill press, I checked the chuck runout. Further, I did a test drill in a piece of scrap steel I had then stuck the drill shank in the hole to check for oversize/runout. Before drilling the receiver, I find a inconspicuous spot inside the receiver and check if for hardness with a jeweler's file. If the file bites, I'm good to go. If the file skids, I consider it too hard. I align the sight base using squares or levels and clamp the base in position with parallel clamps. I then mark the holes with a transfer punch. Mcmaster has a good assortment of these. I deepen the transfer punch marks with a prick punch. I then clamp the receiver in a drill press (which has previously been verified for squareness with a dial indicator that has been swept in the chuck) using a vise, clamp fixtures or angle plate as necessary. The holes are located with a centerfinder in the drill chuck against the previously punched hole centers. I start drilling with a center drill then follow up with the appropriate tap drill. Then I tap the hole using a Starrett 93 T handle tap wrench that is piloted by an appropriate sized drill shank in the drill chuck. Each hole in drilled and tapped this way before moving on to the next hole. No problems so far except for a commercial Mauser with a bridge that had a variation in hardness. I was able to tap one hole but the second hole is just too hard. When I send it off for bluing, I will have the gunsmith tap the hole for me since he is familiar with the spot annealing procedure required. http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/mm127/bob8pics/drilltapmauser.jpg

Zeke/PA
February 27, 2012, 08:05 PM
Mookie,
I checked out MSC's website and they have a cheaper version.
MSC #05041850

rcmodel
February 27, 2012, 08:44 PM
Note Bobsmiths last picture.

Any standard T-handle tap wrench can be used with a pointed rod or upside down drill bit chucked in a drill press to hole it square with the hole.
They come center-drilled on the back for just such use.

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&gs_nf=1&cp=8&gs_id=22&xhr=t&q=t+handle+tap+handle+wrench&pq=tap+handle&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1040&bih=566&wrapid=tljp1330389799935214&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=3467908529642212653&sa=X&ei=KSNMT6f4AYfaiQKKx6ShDw&sqi=2&ved=0CGQQ8wIwAA#

rc

mookiie
February 27, 2012, 09:56 PM
Thanks rc/zeke!

Clark
February 28, 2012, 05:00 PM
Here is an 18 second video of me tapping a 7/8-14 hole while making a barrel vise.

Unlike other exercise videos, it has right wing radio instead of music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYRifHc1MiU&feature=plcp

Zeke/PA
February 28, 2012, 06:53 PM
7/8 x 14?
Hope the wrench dosen't slip an turn your house about another 90 degrees!

CZguy
February 28, 2012, 07:45 PM
7/8 x 14?
Hope the wrench dosen't slip an turn your house about another 90 degrees!

Got a chuckle out of that one.

Elkins45
February 29, 2012, 12:14 AM
Here is an 18 second video of me tapping a 7/8-14 hole while making a barrel vise.

Unlike other exercise videos, it has right wing radio instead of music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYRifHc1MiU&feature=plcp
For the purpose of practice I wouldn't waste my good 6-48 scope mounting taps. Go buy some common ones from Lowes when you buy your tap wrench.

langenc
February 29, 2012, 12:29 AM
Try another smith--$75 is a rip off, royal.

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