Antique police batons?


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Owen Sparks
February 22, 2012, 11:30 PM
The recent thread about the nearly obsolete black jacks and saps has me curious about other old police weapons. I have seen wooden police batons at gun shows and swap meets and they usually seem short and light by todays standards. Does anybody have one made before the days of polycarbonate and PR-24's? If so could you please post a picture and give an idea of the weight and length? Does anyone collect these like they do badges and handcuffs?

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Owen Sparks
February 23, 2012, 11:13 AM
Ever heard of an espantoon? Apparantly the city of Baltimore now allows the cops to carry the traditional wooden club again. Below is the story.

http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/blog/2008/10/the_espantoon.html

These things are all hand turned and must be privatly purchased. They cost around $80.

ThorinNNY
February 23, 2012, 11:42 AM
Impressive!

glistam
February 23, 2012, 12:04 PM
Ah, now you're talking my neck of the woods (being a life long Marylander). Sadly I don't have my own espantoon...yet...but I've had a long standing fascination with stick weapons (and sticks in general) so I might just add these to the collecting.

A handful of antique shops off MD 97 have old wooden batons for sale. I'll have to see if the sellers can tell me about them and, if I don't have the cash, if they'll let me take pics.

Owen Sparks
February 23, 2012, 12:53 PM
Look what I found:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7UsAELvxrs&feature=related

A bored cop turns the habit of fidgeting into an art form by twirling his espantoon. This is supposedly a tradition in Baltimore though it was suspended for a number of years because the chief saw it as an intimidating form of brandishment. Espantoons are back by popular demand and even twirling is encouraged. Deffinitly worth a look.

Carl Levitian
February 23, 2012, 06:12 PM
About time!

When I was a kid growing up in Washington D.C., you never saw a cop waking his beat without his stick right in hand. Back in those days, cops knew how to put on a show with those sticks, and we kids loved to watch. But it also sent a good message to the street punks. Don't mess with the cop. This was decades before they started to require college degrees for cops, and you had big beefy guys who knew the streets and didn't need a degree to deal with the bad guys.

Maybe more cities ought to go back to the 1950's.

ThorinNNY
February 23, 2012, 06:34 PM
I don`t ever recall seeing any police batons or night sticks for sale at any of the gun shows I`ve been to.In NYS it might be illegal for an non-LEO to purchase & possess them.I`d have to check on that.

sidheshooter
February 23, 2012, 10:20 PM
I don't collect them myself, Owen, but I do agree that they are interesting. *I did find this pic of some 19th-c. night stick examples on wiki when the other thread was active, as well as some of these guys (below) being made now:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8c/Edinburgh_police_truncheons_%2819thC%29.JPG


http://www.sheepdogwoodworks.com/The_History_of_the_Stick.php



http://www.westcoastwoodturning.com/index.cfm/fa/categories.main/parentcat/31886


http://www.shoppalstores.com/handcrafted/image//logos/billy-cocobolo-web.jpg

Owen Sparks
February 24, 2012, 12:53 AM
Nice display sidheshooter, I wonder what the bell shaped thing is on the baton on the extreme left? The only true "stick" is the long black one in the middle. All the others are clubs being that the center of gravity or balance point is closer to the striking end. The crown painted on the majority makes me assume that this is a collection of British billy clubs.

Dr.Rob
February 24, 2012, 04:45 AM
I have one in my safe that my dad told a very interesting story about, I'll have to dig it out to weigh it. This dates to about 1959/60's Charleston, WVa.

This thing is 20 inches long and weighs exactly one pound (16 ounces). I assumed when I was a kid that this was made of wood but I can see NO grain, and in fact the surface is embedded with metal bits. :eek:

This was a serious piece of gear back in the day.

glistam
February 24, 2012, 12:01 PM
I just was reminded of this 4000 year old Egyptian painting. It goes to show just how old the baton is to police work. And yes the author is being a little tongue-in-cheek:

Piraticalbob
February 24, 2012, 04:02 PM
Nice display sidheshooter, I wonder what the bell shaped thing is on the baton on the extreme left? The only true "stick" is the long black one in the middle. All the others are clubs being that the center of gravity or balance point is closer to the striking end. The crown painted on the majority makes me assume that this is a collection of British billy clubs.
Wikipedia identifies a similar object as a "hinged club." I'd call it a slungshot, myself. That pic, by the way, can be found with the Wikipedia article on police batons.

Owen Sparks
February 24, 2012, 04:11 PM
So it is sort of a variation of num chucks?

Edited in: I did a little research and it appears that hinged clubs were a forerunner to the blackjack and used rope rather than a spring. The concept was to lessen the mass of the weapon by allowing it to give on impact. Blackjacks as well as striking to the head are now obsolete in police training. Too many people died from head injuries during the riots in the late 1960's so the head is no longer taught as a target.

Here is a video clip of Chicago cops whacking hippies over the head during the riot outside the Democratic national convention in 1968:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvebyWqLXeo&feature=related

riceboy72
February 24, 2012, 08:12 PM
I'm glad to see this thread. I have, since the late 90's - early 2000's, collected various old wood 'nightsticks' (aka truncheons, billy clubs, batons, etc) and I love them. Most were found on eBay before they had a cow and shut down selling them, citing them as weapons versus collectibles. I just wish I knew the story behind each of them.

Some of them are quite ornate for being wood; I marvel at the craftsmanship used back then, many of which were hand turned and handmade altogether. Each stick, I assume, has quite the history. Most have dings and dents from what I would opine was a well carried and lived career.

I often look for old sticks when I go into antique stores, but being the west coast, they're not as prevalent as those on the east coast where history and lineage rule. My favorite is an old British police truncheon in near perfect condition. After playing with it, I would not want to go toe to toe with a well heeled Bobby who knew his way around one.

Some great, modern batons with old school flair here:

http://personal.picusnet.com/aa3jt/

Leadbutt
February 24, 2012, 09:45 PM
I remember walking the the first beat with my "wood" it was made of ironwood and drilled the last 2 inches, back filled with soft lead and finished over, could dent the hell out of a street sign or drunks shoulder, it took me weeks to learn to bounce and twirl with out killing my shins or passers by:p

Only other thing I wish I still had in my possession, is my old call box key

bikerdoc
February 25, 2012, 07:25 AM
I dont have any of my original sticks in my posession. My son has the lead filled one and few others.
I was/am small, just made the ht and weight requirement. My first partner once I left a walking beat to a cruiser was 6' 5" which once led a huge mope to say "Whats this a cop and a half"? The 1/2 cop dealt with his negative social behavior with the help of the stick.

Leadbutt.

We had turn box keys until the mid 70's, alas dont have that either.( remember cold nights waiting for the sgt to give you your "see"?)

Your in my area, PM me maybe we can hang out.

Carl Levitian
February 25, 2012, 09:02 AM
When I was on the Trinidad P.D., Trinidad Colorado, we couldn't have the great nightsticks. The instructors at the Colorado Law Enforcement Training Academy were on the koga kick, so we got a strait stick and were taught to do the damage with the ends of the stick more than the stick itself. Almost all the techniques were two handed blocks and thrusts, and leverage to move people who don't want to be moved. It worked, but it took a lot more training and practice. I wonder if the old fashioned stick would have been more intuitive and effective than the koga. I know that in the crowded bas on commercial street I'd have liked a shorter stick for the close quarters they were.

I remember talking with one of the old timer cops we had, and he said to pick a stick the length of your for arm from elbow to finger tips. He carried the old style nightstick, and it was a thing of beauty. Great grain pattern in the wood and beautiful lathe work. We younger cops were very jealous of it. Our Chief though, Dennis Dempsy, was into the modern koga and called it a table leg.

Carl.

Leadbutt
February 25, 2012, 11:05 AM
AH!!! THe look see to make sure you where walking and breathing not bammered up some where warm and cozy. :p:p

Got so mad one time on an arrest I locked the "bounce" around the pole and stood in the door way waiting on the wagon.

bikerdoc
February 25, 2012, 01:42 PM
Ah Ha, the wagon :) No heat in the back but a good place to administer contempt of cop citations. Boy those floors were slippery, somehow perps kept falling down.

Sadly old school Chief was replace by a kinder gentler type who took away our sticks and saps and issued those tonfa like B 24 thingies, yuck.

grampster
February 27, 2012, 08:45 PM
I've still got my custom fit cherrywood stick that I bought off an orchard farmer in 1964. The leather thong is long ago rotted away. It's got lots of nicks and gouges, mostly from having it slip down when I was shutting the cruiser door. I'm left handed.

I could twirl that stick with the best of 'em. That stick stopped a lot of incidents that could have escalated. It was a multifunctional tool.

Deltaboy
March 3, 2012, 09:41 PM
They are great, I made one back in High School out of Boise a Arc and nearly got a whipping because Dad had to send his lathe tools in to be resharped.

Jenrick
March 6, 2012, 09:09 PM
My department was ASP, and has recently gone to the PR-24. We got issued a straight baton though (with a grommet, so no twirling). I loved my straight stick, just having it it the ring on my belt quieted everyone down on more then one occasion. The few times I actually had it in my hands, things definitely changed their course for the better. I never had to stick anyone, and to be honest the TASER is probably a safer option for all concerned, but the stick is just as much a part of LE culture as handcuffs and a whistle.

-Jenrick

Owen Sparks
March 6, 2012, 11:29 PM
Y'all still use whistles?

Maia007
March 11, 2012, 09:36 PM
Here is a short club apparently used by the SFPD (San Francisco?, Santa Fe?). See Stamping shown. It is also stamped "28" on the end.

It is shown on a piece of writing paper. 10" long x 1 9/16" at the widest and about 11/16" at the narrowest portion near the end-knob. It was finished with a shellac or varnish that is now crazing. There are a number of dents in it from having been used.

I got it in antique shop in Nevada several years ago and I have it as a desk ornament along with a couple of ancient, non-functional Colt revolvers, a buffalo horn powder flask made by A.O. Niedner, a photo of my grandfather and other items suitable for a man's desk. It appears to be made of rosewood. It is denser by weight than osage orange, hornbeam, holly, white oak and other suitable hardwoods that I have made duplicates of this piece from.

birdshot8's
March 11, 2012, 10:16 PM
When I was assigned to shore patrol duty, I was told, "the human skull requires more force to crack than the billy can bring to bear, so do not hesitate to apply it to the head if they need it."

rodinal220
March 14, 2012, 01:02 AM
Kel-Lite

bikerdoc
March 14, 2012, 07:46 AM
Mag-lite, = illuminating, improvised darktime baton. (he said with a smirk)

Deltaboy
March 15, 2012, 11:23 PM
A 6 D cell Mag lite will take out a knee with a single blow. I saw a LEO friend respond to a fight and he took that Mag lite and put the perp flat of his back hollaring #$%@ my knee.

kBob
March 17, 2012, 02:10 PM
While it may be possible that sailors have thicker skulls than the rest of humanity that shore patrol instruction was incorrect.

Meanwhile folks tend to forget that a night stick could be used for other than striking. One could use it in a variety of holds not unlike some akedo stick moves or philipine stick techneques. Even as once shown in the old fictional "Blue Knight" TV show where the title character was being out run by a younger fleeing felon and he tossed his stick at the felons feet to trip him.

Also a stick gives you something to play with during the long boring bits...thus the strap twirls and spins.

WHen I was last in the military, those pulling motor pool guard in my unit were issued a plywood board with instructions laminated on it, an angle head flashlight, a whistle, and a short night stick. WHen I would post guards I explained that anythime they felt the need to use the whistle they should also be bashing the flat of the plywood with the night stick to make more noise and let the bad guy know they could wael the tar out of them if they got close enough.

-kBob

kBob
March 17, 2012, 02:28 PM
Also on a like note this got me remembering the days of Flat Saps and Spring Saps and Come-a-longs.

I recently saw a book mark that reminded me of the old hard leather Flat Saps ( and there was a news story a year or so ago about a lady on a plane with such a book mark being charged having a weapon)and my wife has been considering purchacing a "twitch" for dealing with an impolite pony that is basically a chain come-a-long with a long wood handle rather than a T grip. Recently saw an add for one of the solid two claw type come-a-longs being sold as a historical curio.

WHen I was a kid a local cop had one of those 'Chinese finger cuffs" tubes that are typically made of rattan and sold as toys. His was made of flattened braided copper wire and would NOT pull apart.

For a bit I had a set of steel thumb cuffs a German Polezi gave me. As it was a single flat bit of steel with a jaw on each end, once in place it made an excellent come-a-long of sorts. The Polezi in that area used the hinged handcuff rather than chain types and those functioned as come-a-longs very well.

-kBob

Deltaboy
March 17, 2012, 08:14 PM
Cool Stuff. Batons are fun to play with and with proper training and self control they still can and could work well.

glistam
April 20, 2012, 07:41 PM
Well, this marks yet another occasion that this forum inspired me to buy something cool. As a Marylander that grew up around Charm City, I couldn't help but want a piece of history I could hold in my hand.

http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq157/glistam/MyEspantooncopy.jpg

This is made by www.eliteespantoons.com, a little side project of Chase Armington, sergeant with the Perryville PD.

This one is cocobolo and what is most striking in person is how large they are. It's almost like a ceremonial mace used at universities. 24" long, balance point 11" from the pommel, shaft is 1.4" in diameter and the "hilt" is almost 2", and it weighs 1.7 pounds.

Besides the large, elaborately turned handle, another distinctive feature is the hand strap. It's quite long and attaches below the guard instead of the pommel. It's a popular archetype of the late 19th and early 20th century policeman walking down the street twirling his baton vertically by the strap. The espantoon however is spun horizontally like a helicopter, and even has a metal pivot in the strap so this can be done continuously without it twisting. It's great fun and I can see why many in Baltimore City still carry them around on foot patrol.

Owen Sparks
April 20, 2012, 11:08 PM
Notice the grooves on the business end that can serve as an emergency handle.

dprice3844444
April 20, 2012, 11:58 PM
still have my short plastic baton and my aluminum pr24

glistam
April 21, 2012, 08:50 AM
Notice the grooves on the business end that can serve as an emergency handle.

Yup, but they're also used for two-handed thrusts, so you can maintain control and throw your weight behind it, a technique that is still taught today with ASP and Monadnock.

Deltaboy
April 21, 2012, 04:46 PM
Very nice! I got to get a book holder from levers.

Doug S
April 21, 2012, 06:02 PM
Few years ago a local Army/Navy surplus store had a box full of them. I picked up 4 of them for $1.50 a piece. Went back later and saw that the cler, had priced them incorrectly, but they still were still pretty cheap. Just a basic stick with a grooved grip and a lanyard hole like some of those pictued in this thread. Don't have a picture of one.

Owen Sparks
April 21, 2012, 10:26 PM
In an emergency you might grab your stick by the wrong end.

Deltaboy
April 21, 2012, 11:10 PM
It would work with either end you grap ! That is smart thinking.

Owen Sparks
April 23, 2012, 01:30 AM
And the balance point is close enough to the middle that it would handle much the same no matter what end you grabbed.

BTW, practice with it backwards occaisonly just in case.

Deltaboy
April 23, 2012, 11:20 AM
I do just that with my canes. You never know which end you might need to strike a blow with.

Fred Fuller
April 23, 2012, 08:29 PM
Speaking of espantoons - not exactly 'new' news, but...

There are photos at the link...

http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/blog/2008/10/the_espantoon.html
OCTOBER 31, 2008
The Espantoon

There has been great response to my postings and those of the Baltimore Sun's Copy Desk Chief John E. McIntyre on old police terms, cliches and the differences in cop lingo between Baltimore and New York.

One reader reminded me of a New York term I had all but forgotten: "On the job."

Several readers have commented on the Espantoon -- defined in Webster's Third Edition: "In Baltimore, a policeman's stick" -- and one asked for a picture of one. Here are a couple by Sun photographer Amy Davis shot back in 2000 when then Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris reversed a ban and allowed officers to once again carry the sticks. Tradition returned.

Here is "Nightstick Joe" making an Espantoon in the basement of his Federal Hill rowhouse in 2000, and another of him outside with the stick.

What follows is the complete story published on Sept. 23, 2000 that I wrote on the return of the Espantoon. I've been warned against posting long takes from old stories, but so many want to know the history I think some of you might be interested:

By Peter Hermann

Nightstick Joe is back in business.

To the delight of tradition-minded Baltimore police officers, the city's new commissioner agreed yesterday to allow his troops to carry the once-banned espantoon, a wooden nightstick with an ornately tooled handle and a long leather strap for twirling.

Joseph Hlafka, who retired last year after three decades as an officer on the force and is best known by his nickname earned for turning out the sticks on his basement lathe, will once again see his handiwork being used by officers patrolling city streets.

Orders for the $30 sticks are coming in. A local police supply store has ordered three dozen to boost its stock. Commissioner Edward T. Norris bought five. Young officers who have never seen one are calling with questions.

"They want to know how to twirl it," Hlafka said.

Before Norris arrived from New York in January, he had never heard of an "espantoon." He knew the generic "baton," "nightstick" and "billy club," and was well acquainted with New York's technical "PR-24."

He challenged his command staff to prove the term belongs solely to Mobtown. And there, in Webster's Third Edition: "Espantoon, Baltimore, a policeman's club."

Norris signed the order yesterday, and the espantoon once again became a sanctioned, but optional, piece of police equipment.

"When I found out what they meant to the rank and file, I said, `Bring them back,'" said Norris, who is trying to boost morale. "It is a tremendous part of the history of this Police Department."

Hlafka is delighted. When the sticks were barred in 1994 by a commissioner who didn't like them, his production dropped from about 70 a month to 30, with most of them going to officers in departments across the country and collectors.

They are now made from blocks of Bubinga, a hardwood imported from South Africa that doesn't get brittle in cold weather. Hlafka whittles and sands the wood to remove visible blemishes on the sticks, which measure from 22 inches to 25 inches long.
///snip

Deltaboy
April 23, 2012, 10:44 PM
That is a great story!

Owen Sparks
April 24, 2012, 12:26 AM
I am thinking about having him make me a custom 28" stick with handle grooves on both ends.

m6tlogistics
May 2, 2012, 02:28 AM
Numrich

NightCtix
August 2, 2012, 11:04 PM
Hello, I'm the new guy here. By some quirk of nature I have never found this site before today. I have not read every post here but read several then registered. I have been a Texas Peace Officer almost 40 years and have been collecting police "stuff" all those years. I have over 300 nightsticks, I recently sold a collection of 70 blackjacks, saps and such. I see most of the posts in this thread are several years old but I would be happy to discuss anything about sticks with anyone interested. I have several of the British Truncheons shown. I certainly don't know "everything" about sticks but I've learned a lot over the years. Part of my collection was used in "American Police Equipment" by Matthew Forte.

Bikewer
August 3, 2012, 12:24 AM
The local St. Louis Metro PD for many years issued a fairly short, heavy wooden nightstick, and many of the officers here used to twirl them as described.

An interesting feature of the St. Louis model was a steel ferrule on the grip end.
The purpose of this was so that pre-radio foot-beat coppers could whack the pavement with same to produce a loud, ringing distress call.

4v50 Gary
August 3, 2012, 12:40 AM
I want to learn the baton dance that Bumper Morgan did.

NightCtix
January 27, 2013, 11:17 PM
Only other thing I wish I still had in my possession, is my old call box key

I am near retirement with 40 yrs. police service. At the beginning of my career I was given a brass call box key by a family friend who was retiring and had carried it for 40 yrs. As a TX Deputy Sheriff I never used the key officially on a call box but I did carry the key on my key ring every day I ever worked on duty. About two years ago (2011) a small town in my county installed a new (and their only) traffic light. For whatever reason I tried the key on this modern traffic light control box and it fit. I'm not easily amazed but that was truly amazing, that a key 80+ yrs. old fit. I've since been curious of the history of the connection between the police call box and the traffic light control box. I guess it is somewhat obvious since a beat cop could access each of the boxes for official business but it is still a helluva coincidence I think.

Bikewer
January 28, 2013, 12:13 PM
Funny story about those old call boxes. My old lieutenant had been a young copper in St. Louis back before two-way radio and he broke in with his training officer using the call boxes.
The guy would never let him call in, he'd always get out of the car and call in himself.
My boss-to-be realized as well that the old guy also got progressively "lit" through the night.
Sure enough... He had a bottle stashed in each call box.

Ah, the good old days.

bikerdoc
January 28, 2013, 06:07 PM
*I still have my original issued stick, sap, and brass call box key.

Man that was a long time ago, I have been off the job longer than I was on it.

4v50 Gary
January 28, 2013, 07:04 PM
I also have my old brass call box key, a straight stick and PR-24. We were never allowed saps or short batons. Nor were head shots authorized. Later we were instructed on how to use our flashlights as an weapon should there be no time to transition to the baton. That included head strikes. Any use of force had to be included in the report and had to be justified by the officer. The watch commander who approved the report had you make an entry into the use of force log at the station. Done properly, the paperwork could protect you in an excessice force investigation or complaint.

joshk-k
January 29, 2013, 03:53 PM
I have an old Portland Police baton that I bought from a former co-worker who's family was in the antiques business. It's two feet long, grooved handle at one end. I have the leather belt and holster for it too. It lives in the bottom drawer of my dresser and, in the middle of the night, would be more immedately accessible to me than any of my guns. Occasionally, I look from my kitchen window and see unaccompanied dogs in my yard. I bring that along when I go to chase them off.

This weekend I got it out for a nine-year-old to use while we were stretching and drying an elk hide.

I bought it as a defensive tool. I certainly wouldn't want to get cracked with it. I feel confident that I could break any bone I hit with it.

JOsh

Loc n Load
February 1, 2013, 09:42 AM
I started my career in 75 on a large metro dept. in Cal. We were issued 6" 38spl revolvers and a 26" hardwood baton.....when we went on shift that baton was a mandatory part of your gear.....later as a motor cop I carried a sap in a specially made sap pocket which put the sap about midway down my right leg.....where it was readily accessible.....later I was issued a PR-24 which was useful, but I missed my hardwood stick.....the plastic sticks had a tendency to curl if left on a hot car seat......plus they had a tendency to break in cold weather.....the hardwoods didn't. I have seen horse mounted riot police use hardwood staffs that looked like jousting poles....finished my career in 08 carrying an expandable baton.

Ohio Deputy
April 9, 2013, 10:58 AM
Well, this marks yet another occasion that this forum inspired me to buy something cool. As a Marylander that grew up around Charm City, I couldn't help but want a piece of history I could hold in my hand.

http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq157/glistam/MyEspantooncopy.jpg

This is made by www.eliteespantoons.com, a little side project of Chase Armington, sergeant with the Perryville PD.

This one is cocobolo and what is most striking in person is how large they are. It's almost like a ceremonial mace used at universities. 24" long, balance point 11" from the pommel, shaft is 1.4" in diameter and the "hilt" is almost 2", and it weighs 1.7 pounds.

Besides the large, elaborately turned handle, another distinctive feature is the hand strap. It's quite long and attaches below the guard instead of the pommel. It's a popular archetype of the late 19th and early 20th century policeman walking down the street twirling his baton vertically by the strap. The espantoon however is spun horizontally like a helicopter, and even has a metal pivot in the strap so this can be done continuously without it twisting. It's great fun and I can see why many in Baltimore City still carry them around on foot patrol.
I had Elite Espantoons make one of thos for me out of lignum vitae. They are super nice.

Ohio Deputy
April 9, 2013, 11:07 AM
Hello, I'm the new guy here. By some quirk of nature I have never found this site before today. I have not read every post here but read several then registered. I have been a Texas Peace Officer almost 40 years and have been collecting police "stuff" all those years. I have over 300 nightsticks, I recently sold a collection of 70 blackjacks, saps and such. I see most of the posts in this thread are several years old but I would be happy to discuss anything about sticks with anyone interested. I have several of the British Truncheons shown. I certainly don't know "everything" about sticks but I've learned a lot over the years. Part of my collection was used in "American Police Equipment" by Matthew Forte.
I would love to talk sticks or jacks with you. I have been looking for someone that might have a certain style of short billy that I've been wanting to have madeup.

Ohio Deputy
April 9, 2013, 11:22 AM
The local St. Louis Metro PD for many years issued a fairly short, heavy wooden nightstick, and many of the officers here used to twirl them as described.

An interesting feature of the St. Louis model was a steel ferrule on the grip end.
The purpose of this was so that pre-radio foot-beat coppers could whack the pavement with same to produce a loud, ringing distress call.
The Mullanphy Stick, those are still made. I will try to post some pics when I get time.

gastong30
April 12, 2013, 09:39 AM
In the Louisville Slugger museum they have some batons that they madem in addition to baseball bats. IIRC they were from the 40's.

Double_J
April 12, 2013, 04:43 PM
you guys are making me want to get a stick again. I had two of them when I was growing up, both from a local surplus store in town. I got pretty good with basic strikes (growing up with a younger brother helped a bunch), and some blocks.

I guess I need to find a proper stick instructor now that I am old enough to know how to use one. I had a cheap collapsible baton when I did security years ago, and we got just enough training to "qualify" with it. That was mainly no striking to the head, strike to arms, and legs, and jab to stomach.

I do love the stories and pics. of the old wood, they remind me of a time when police could be counted on to be fair and honest, not holier-than-thou like many I meet now-a-days.

joeschmoe
April 12, 2013, 05:19 PM
The original British police batons were based on sailors "Belaying Pins". They are, still, used to hold ropes into a wooden rail. Sometimes made of brass. As old as sailing with ropes.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/18/Belaying_Pin_(PSF).jpg/300px-Belaying_Pin_(PSF).jpg

glistam
April 12, 2013, 05:47 PM
The original British police batons were based on sailors "Belaying Pins". They are, still, used to hold ropes into a wooden rail. Sometimes made of brass. As old as sailing with ropes.

I believe it was Robert Peel that made the adaptation, who knew sailors were conking heads with them for centuries.

thepumpfaction
April 12, 2013, 09:02 PM
My neighbor gave me a wood lathe when I was 16. I went to the hardware store and bought like 12 feet of curtain rod. I made quite a few of these lol. I would drill out the end with a spade bit and fill it with pennies, then plug the end with wood glue.

C.F. Plinker
April 12, 2013, 11:06 PM
Didn't one of the TV shows from the late 50s or early 60s open with an MP standing at his post twirling a baton? Just can't remember the name of the show -- must be getting old and having CRS begin to set in.

4v50 Gary
April 12, 2013, 11:10 PM
I think it was The Blue Knight with William Holden protraying Bumper Morgan.

dprice3844444
April 12, 2013, 11:38 PM
http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/blog/2008/10/the_espantoon.html
http://www.eliteespantoons.com/

Deltaboy
April 13, 2013, 08:35 PM
http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/blog/2008/10/the_espantoon.html
http://www.eliteespantoons.com/
Good story these, slaps and such need to come back.They work

Ohio Deputy
April 20, 2013, 10:05 AM
Amen, those were true tools of the trade. The streets haven't gotten any safer yet the powers that be believe we need to do our job in a kinder gentler way.

mdauben
April 20, 2013, 06:06 PM
I have seen wooden police batons at gun shows and swap meets and they usually seem short and light by todays standards.
I remember a story my dad used to tell about his time in the army when he was stationed in England. He and a buddy got a little out of hand at the local pub and the police had to break things up. He was always amazed at how easy the English cop was able to subdue him and his friend (and my dad wasn't a small man) with his little wooden 'stick'. ;)

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