SBR Encore


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Gdbyrd
February 27, 2012, 01:16 AM
How does the SBR treatment work for an Encore? Is it registered to the frame or to an individual barrel? I did a short search online and it says that you can't list Multi under caliber anymore.

I've got a TON of pistol barrels for my Encore, and some of them would be dandy with a rifle stock.

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Saakee
February 27, 2012, 02:09 AM
the receiver is the registered component, barrels are just hunks of metal with some bits scraped out in a nice pattern.

TurtlePhish
February 27, 2012, 10:15 PM
barrels are just hunks of metal with some bits scraped out in a nice pattern.

So are receivers, if you think about it. ;)

a-sheepdog
February 27, 2012, 10:20 PM
You would register the receiver as a SBR and it would forever and always be a SBR, regardless of the barrel in place or the lenth of the barrel.

MasterSergeantA
February 28, 2012, 11:24 AM
http://www.atf.gov/regulations-rulings/rulings/atf-rulings/atf-ruling-2011-4.pdf

MasterSergeantA
February 28, 2012, 11:26 AM
So are receivers, if you think about it. ;)
The difference being that the receivers are serialized and controlled while barrels are generally not.

Sam1911
February 28, 2012, 12:00 PM
You would register the receiver as a SBR and it would forever and always be a SBR, regardless of the barrel in place or the lenth of the barrel.

Well...sort of.

Once you register the receiver as an SBR, it is a legal SBR -- when configured as such -- until/unless you notify the BATFE to remove it from the registry.

However, if you replace the barrels of your SBR with a >16" barrel, it isn't an NFA-regulated weapon and can be taken across state lines, even to states that don't allow SBRs, loaned to someone else to use, etc.

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/national-firearms-act-short-barreled-rifles-shotguns.html
Q: What is the registered part of a Short Barreled Rifle (SBR) or Short Barreled Shotgun (SBS)?While a receiver alone may be classified as a “firearm” under the Gun Control Act (GCA), SBRs and SBSs are classified in totality under the National Firearms Act (NFA). A firearm that meets the definition of a SBR consists of a rifle that has a barrel less than 16 inches in length. A SBS consists of a shotgun that has a barrel less than 18 inches in length. The serialized receiver is recorded for registration in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record (NFRTR).

Q: I possess a properly registered SBR or SBS. I intend to strip the receiver and remove the barrel prior to selling the receiver. Is the bare receiver still subject to regulation under the NFA as a SBR or SBS?
A stripped receiver without a barrel does not meet the definition of a SBR or SBS under the NFA. Although the previously registered firearm would remain registered unless the possessor notified the NFA Branch of the change, there is no provision in statute or regulation requiring registration of a firearm without a barrel because its physical characteristics would make it only a GCA “firearm” pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 921(a)(3)(B). If the subsequent owner buys the receiver as a GCA firearm and installs a barrel less than 16 inches in length (SBR) or 18 inches in length (SBS), the firearm would be subject to a $200 making tax and registration under the NFA by the manufacturer or maker of the SBR or SBS. Because registration depends upon the stated intent of the applicant, there is no provision to allow registration of a NFA firearm by anyone other than the maker or manufacturer.

Q: If I remove the short barrel from the registered SBR or SBS, is the receiver still subject to NFA transfer and possession regulations?
If the possessor retains control over the barrel or other parts required to assemble the SBR or SBS, the firearm would still be subject to NFA transfer and possession regulations. ATF recommends contacting State law enforcement officials to ensure compliance with state and local law.

Q: Does the installation of a barrel over 16 inches in length (SBR) or 18 inches in length (SBS) remove the firearm from the purview of the NFA? If so, is this considered a permanent change?
Installation of a barrel greater than 16 inches in length (SBR) or 18 inches in length (SBS) will remove the firearm from the purview of the NFA provided the registrant does not maintain control over the parts necessary to reconfigure the firearm as a SBR or SBS.

Q: Is it necessary to send notification to ATF and receive acknowledgement that the SBR or SBS has been removed from the purview of the NFA before it may be sold as a GCA firearm?
There is no requirement for the possessor of a registered NFA firearm to notify ATF that the firearm has been removed from the purview of the NFA. However, ATF recommends the possessor notify the NFA Branch of such changes in writing so that the possessor is not mistakenly identified as the owner if the firearm is later used in a crime. If, at the time of transfer, the firearm does not meet the definition of a SBR, it should be transferred without filing the NFA transfer application and without payment of the transfer tax.

Q: If I remove the short barrel from my SBR or SBS, may I move the firearm across state lines without the submission of ATF Form 5320.20, Application to Transport or to Temporarily Export Certain Firearms?
If the registrant retains control over the parts required to assemble the SBR or SBS, the firearm is still be subject to all requirements of the NFA. ATF recommends contacting law enforcement officials in the destination state to ensure compliance with state and local law.

Q: May the short barrel on an SBR or SBS be replaced with a long barrel for hunting or other purposes, with the intent of replacing the short barrel?
Yes, and you will not be required to again register the firearm before replacing the short barrel. ATF recommends written notification to the NFA Branch when a firearm’s configuration is permanently changed or removed from the purview of the NFA.


Some of that is a little convoluted -- regadring who possesses the short barrels when -- but not to bad.

MasterSergeantA
February 28, 2012, 03:14 PM
You would register the receiver as a SBR and it would forever and always be a SBR, regardless of the barrel in place or the lenth of the barrel.
If you are starting with a pistol, you can build the SBR and put the stock on it, but I don't believe that you can go back to it being a pistol under current guidelines. You CAN put a >16" barrel on it and drop the SBR part, but I think you have to commit to it permanently being a rifle. You would notify the ATF at that point and they would annotate the registry accordingly (in theory, at least).

If you were to put a >16" barrel on the pistol and then add the stock, you would simply be configuring a non-NFA rifle. You could take the stock back off and then the long barrel (in that order) and put it back into pistol configuration. But when you 'make' the SBR, the game changes.

Sam1911
February 28, 2012, 03:56 PM
If you are starting with a pistol, you can build the SBR and put the stock on it, but I don't believe that you can go back to it being a pistol under current guidelines.I don't know about that. With the recent change in their policy on the whole "once a rifle, always a rifle" issue, I think this might be incorrect.

You CAN put a >16" barrel on it and drop the SBR part, but I think you have to commit to it permanently being a rifle. You would notify the ATF at that point and they would annotate the registry accordingly (in theory, at least).If you read the ATF's pages (I quoted above) on SBRs/SBSs, that doesn't sound like what they are saying.

jmorris
February 28, 2012, 04:09 PM
Quote:


If you are starting with a pistol, you can build the SBR and put the stock on it, but I don't believe that you can go back to it being a pistol under current guidelines.


I don't know about that. With the recent change in their policy on the whole "once a rifle, always a rifle" issue, I think this might be incorrect.

Even before the recent change concerning mechtech/glock conversions allowing an owner to go back and forth, contenders themselves were exempt from the "once a rifle" idea. They even sold them with barrels long/short and stocks/pistol grip so the owner could swap between the two.

In the case of United States v. Thompson/Center Arms Co. (1992) is how they were exempt, never could figure out why the BAFTE didn't allow others to do the same. In any case they changed their mind, for the better this time.

TurtlePhish
February 28, 2012, 04:48 PM
The difference being that the receivers are serialized and controlled while barrels are generally not.


Yeah, yeah, I know. It was a joke. :p

Cosmoline
February 28, 2012, 06:25 PM
Personally I'm planning on going on a drug store robbing spree with my T/C. I'll be known as the 7-30 Waters bandit. I just hope the officers give me time to reload between rounds.

Sam1911
February 28, 2012, 06:59 PM
Even before the recent change concerning mechtech/glock conversions allowing an owner to go back and forth, contenders themselves were exempt from the "once a rifle" idea. They even sold them with barrels long/short and stocks/pistol grip so the owner could swap between the two.

Actually, what the ATF said was IF the Contender was sold as a kit -- and a very few were -- they could go back and forth. Otherwise, no.

All water under the bridge, now.

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