"you can shoot 357s out of that 38 special"


PDA






Superdave70_02
March 2, 2012, 04:55 PM
I was at Acadamy in Amarillo tx a couple days ago and decided to check out the guns. While I was waiting at the gun counter, the guy in front of me asked to see a 38 special snubby and as the clerk handed it to him he said "you can shoot 357s in that you know." After I caught my breath me and about 5 other customers quickly corrected him.

My question is what do you do in this situation? Is correcting him enough or should I have asked to speak to a manager?

I got to thinking about it later and wandered what kind of bad info he has given to other people, wrong ammo for their gun, or who knows what.

If you enjoyed reading about ""you can shoot 357s out of that 38 special"" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Certaindeaf
March 2, 2012, 04:58 PM
.My question is what do you do in this situation?.
Personally, I'd post it on the internet.

dnilson
March 2, 2012, 05:00 PM
I would call and speak to the manager so he can be properly educated. NOT fired, just properly educated.

Superdave70_02
March 2, 2012, 05:00 PM
Don't be a jerk. I was asking If I would have been out of bounds reporting him to a manager? If you can't take "the high road" please keep your response to yourself.

mnhntr
March 2, 2012, 05:01 PM
I worked part time in the Gander near me and I have to say they hire warm bodies not knowledgeable people. I was going home pissed after each shift until I just let it go and had grown tired of always correcting other employees. This is what you get in a box store instead of a mom and pop type of shop.

gamestalker
March 2, 2012, 05:03 PM
Wow! I wouldn't be able to restrain myself from correcting him. Even though 38 spcl. revolvers won't typically chamber .357's, it's still a serious situation to which should be clarified. Calling the attention of a manager to his employee's ignorance, is certainly in line with what's the right thing to do, I would think.

19-3Ben
March 2, 2012, 05:12 PM
But everyone knows that .38 caliber is bigger than .357 caliber, right?!?!?
;)

So the real question is, how the heck did a guy with such little basic knowledge of firearms get hired to work at a gun shop?

ColtPythonElite
March 2, 2012, 05:14 PM
So the real question is, how the heck did a guy with such little basic knowledge of firearms get hired to work at a gun shop?
Because minimum wage sometimes only gets you the minimum. In this case as long as the guy can run a cash register, he is probably qualified. I don't expect expert techincal information out of store clerks.

eldon519
March 2, 2012, 05:26 PM
He might have just slipped up, you know. Talking to the manager seems a bit ridiculous to me. I imagine being embarassed in front of a customer will be enough to help him remember. No need to be so tightly wound.

jk2008
March 2, 2012, 05:28 PM
I would think that politely correcting the clerk is the proper thing to do.

Also, I would expect that the manager would want to know about this. After all, the clerk is representing the store and if the clerk is ignorant (or dishonest) that would reflect poorly on the manager and store. The manager can't correct what he doesn't know about.

This doesn't need to be a major situation with manager (no need to loudly call out for the manager and demand the clerk's head on a platter)... a short polite conversation would suffice.

skidooman603
March 2, 2012, 05:32 PM
Go to Walmart and ask questions about the Colts they are carrying..That outta be an education. I will pay the extra couple bucks to deal with Mom and Pop. Even our local gun shop guy ain't the sharpest knife in the drawer but beats the 18 year old kid that just got transfered from pet supplies...

Superdave70_02
March 2, 2012, 05:38 PM
After he was corrected he repeated the same thing he said before, at which point the other clerk took the gun from him and put it back up. I walked away at that point but just thought later that maybe it wasn't just a brain fart and he really was completely clueless to certain firearms/ammo combinations and maybe should have been reported for the sake of customer safety.

bikemutt
March 2, 2012, 06:56 PM
I don't think .357 will fit in a .38 special and have the cylinder close so from a safety standpoint he probably won't cause too much harm. He probably meant to say +P.

Pigoutultra
March 2, 2012, 07:03 PM
The was you tell it is rather vague. You said the person in front of you asked for a .38 snubby. Was he pointing at a specific revolver? Did the revolver actually say .38 special on it?

Dnaltrop
March 2, 2012, 07:09 PM
.357 brass was built deliberately longer to keep people from blowing up their .38's, they shouldn't chamber at all in a .38 that hasn't been mucked with.

btg3
March 2, 2012, 07:19 PM
don't expect expert techincal information out of store clerks.
^^^^^This.

Some can get over it, some can't.

Waywatcher
March 2, 2012, 07:23 PM
Not a big deal.

Obviously wrong, but nothing unsafe here. .357 brass will not fit in a .38 special chamber.

gunguy0829
March 2, 2012, 07:23 PM
Me personaly think there should be at least a basic test on basic firearm knowlege. Most people that dont know are the ones asking the questions. Its the blind leading the blind.

beatledog7
March 2, 2012, 07:24 PM
A logical question might be, if you were to load .357 Magnum brass with DEWCs (almost flush with the case mouth), they would not chamber in a .38SPL cylinder? If you charged them to .38SPL specs, would they not be safe to fire from that .38SPL?

Actually, it turns out, they won't chamber, and it has nothing to do with OAL. The case dimension is the same, but the taper inside a .38SPL cylinder happens too soon to accommodate a .357 case.

gunguy0829
March 2, 2012, 07:27 PM
sorry....I not me, personaly think...

coolluke01
March 2, 2012, 07:34 PM
As in anything it's "buyer beware". I had a local mom and pop gun shop clerk correct me when I was telling my friend that longer barrels don't equal accuracy. It's the sight radius that helps.
You can't expect people to know their job. It's always your responsibility to know what's right.
Im in the service industry and I see people all the time say, "Well this guy told me this and he does this for a living" It doesn't mean he's right!

Jaymo
March 2, 2012, 07:38 PM
I could have sworn that the entire reason .357/.44 mags use a case that is 1/8" longer than .38/.44 Special was so that they would NOT chamber in the Special cylinders.

Are we absolutely sure that he was showing him a .38 snub, and not a .357 snub and pointing out the benefit of the .357 snub?
Not that my hands/wrists find the shooting of .357s from a J frame to be any kind of "benefit".

T Bran
March 2, 2012, 07:54 PM
Yes going to the manager discretely would be in order.
Not to be mean but reading the manual or obtaining a manual for any weapon is an owners responsibility. Regardless of what someone told you if you do something stupid with your weapon and someone is harmed it is on your head. (or would that be off with your head).
T

beatledog7
March 2, 2012, 08:12 PM
I could have sworn that the entire reason .357/.44 mags use a case that is 1/8" longer than .38/.44 Special was so that they would NOT chamber in the Special cylinders.

And you'd have been correct. I was wrong. I had to trim a .357 down to convince myself.

bluetopper
March 2, 2012, 08:24 PM
I bet the manager knows to the very degree of the clerk's gun knowledge. The manager just works there too.

Byrd666
March 2, 2012, 08:24 PM
As a few others have said, I think a mention to the manager would have been in order.
Misinformation can be a very dangerous or deadly thing. I think I would make a return visit to said store and inform the powers that be of the errors of said individual. As you yourself said. there's no telling how many others he gave incorrect information to.

sig228
March 2, 2012, 11:34 PM
Personally, I'd post it on the internet.
Lol

41wheelgun
March 3, 2012, 12:26 AM
Last year during deer season, my supervisor was upset after a weekend hunt and told me he when to a big box store, (starts with a A) and told the guy that he had a 308 winchester lever gun and wanted ammo for it, the clerk said here this is the hottest ammo on the market for the 308. The weekend hunt came and he had a deer come by him and the gun would not shot, so he chamber another round and still the gun would not fire. So I asked if he had the ammo he purchased and as I looked at the box,it I told him his problem was this ammo. The clerk sold him Hornady Leverevolution 308 marllin instead of 308 win.

MrDig
March 3, 2012, 12:53 AM
I have this problem all the time. I must look like a dunce or something. Once I was told it was Illegal to hunt deer with a 7.62x39 round. When I corrected the guy he said "I am in my first semester to be a conservation officer so I should know better." Clearly our state hunting manual sitting on the counter next to him was not enough evidence the he was wrong, because after I showed him the case length and diameter of a 7.62x39 and read the manual that stated it was legal he reiterated that it was not.
Just recently I was told by another Fresh young face that if I wanted to shoot anything other than 22 short I had to buy a Henry Golden Boy not the standard Henry Lever Action .22 caliber. When I pointed to the markings on the side of the one I was looking at and it said 22lr 22l or 22s he claimed the gun needed to be removed from stock because it came from the factory mismarked.
I got a metric butt ton of these stories, after I tell them they are full of mierda del toro, all I do is shake my head and go spend my money elsewhere.
Big Box gun bunnies need to learn the facts or someone could get seriously injured these are firearms not tinker toys.

shiftyer1
March 3, 2012, 01:12 AM
A few years ago I had a van that needed a transmision so I called the parts house for a rebuild kit. I was inforned my vehicle wasn't made with one. Sometimes clerks just don't have a clue. In your case I think he probably just misspoke.

I try to do some research before I buy something.

Owen Sparks
March 3, 2012, 01:16 AM
I have dealt with this same problem for years with home improvement stores where the only qualification for employment is the willingness to work cheap. I have given up asking employees technical questions about building materials.
These are the same type of people who work in sporting goods at big department stores.
In fact they might have been working at the home improvement store last month and they might be selling shoes somewhere else next month. You are on your own.

leeroy71
March 3, 2012, 02:09 AM
If you want to have some fun, ask if .275 rigbys are ok to use in a 7x57. Or should you stick with 7mm mausers for now.:evil:

David E
March 3, 2012, 02:32 AM
What, exactly, would you tell the manager?

"your boy out there is giving out bad info."

"oh?"

"he says a .38 snubby will also shoot .357."

"was he showing the 442, the 360 or the LCR?"

"um, I'm not sure...."

"I appreciate your concern. Have a nice day."

ArchAngelCD
March 3, 2012, 05:36 AM
Personally, I think you should mind your own business. It's not your store and it wasn't dangerous so stay out of it!

Davek1977
March 3, 2012, 06:25 AM
n/m

beatledog7
March 3, 2012, 09:55 AM
The clerk sold him Hornady Leverevolution 308 marllin instead of 308 win.

So, the clerk is at fault?

If Person X owns a gun and doesn't know how to buy proper ammunition for that gun, would Person X please turn that gun in. I don't know where the repository for such guns is located, but Person X clearly needs to find it.

When I first read the title of this thread I suddenly wondered whether I really knew why that title points to a falsehood.

I always heard it was the OAL, but I needed to know, for my own satisfaction, what actually keeps a .357Mag round from chambering in a .38SPL chamber. I wondered whether a .357 wadcutter round, with its short OAL, would chamber in a .38SPL. I experimented with empty cases in a .38SPL cylinder, and learned the truth. One must intentionally shorten a .357 case to .38SPL length to allow it to chamber in a .38SPL. Once one does that, it will chamber in a .38 but is effectively no longer a .357 case.

Should I have just applied what I always read and "knew," that a .357 case is longer than a .38 so an idiot can't chamber a .357 round in a .38 chamber? Perhaps. But having proved it to myself hands-on, my understanding of it has been fortified.

motorcycle-charlie
March 3, 2012, 10:01 AM
I have dealt with this same problem for years with home improvement stores where the only qualification for employment is the willingness to work cheap. I have given up asking employees technical questions about building materials.
These are the same type of people who work in sporting goods at big department stores.
In fact they might have been working at the home improvement store last month and they might be selling shoes somewhere else next month. You are on your own.
absolutely true. i had dealt with a guy at a local Lowes store here and 2 days later i dealt with him at the local Gander Mtn. down the street. he was not very knowledgable at either location, but he was trying his best to help me out. sometimes you need to give people a break. this guy appeared to be in his late 40s or so and just working 2 jobs to make a living. you never know people's situation in life. who knows, he could have been working at one of the major union plants here making $25-$30/hr. when they decided to close shop and move all operations to Mexico.now he has to work 2 jobs to make half of what he used to make.

motorcycle-charlie
March 3, 2012, 10:44 AM
I was at Acadamy in Amarillo tx a couple days ago and decided to check out the guns. While I was waiting at the gun counter, the guy in front of me asked to see a 38 special snubby and as the clerk handed it to him he said "you can shoot 357s in that you know." After I caught my breath me and about 5 other customers quickly corrected him.

My question is what do you do in this situation? Is correcting him enough or should I have asked to speak to a manager?

I got to thinking about it later and wandered what kind of bad info he has given to other people, wrong ammo for their gun, or who knows what.
do you even know what model snub he was showing? maybee the customer asked to see a s&w 340 which is a .357 or a ruger lcr in .357. both look very similar to .38 special variations. the clerk may have been the CORRECT one in this situation. the customer may have been the one who had no idea along with the other customers who decided to be nosy. unless you have all the correct information, it is best to stay out of it, and prevent un wanted embarrassment to yourself and to the store employee who actually MAY know more than many of the people he sells guns to.

beatledog7
March 3, 2012, 10:49 AM
People are doing whatever they have to do for grocery/rent money, and sometimes that means taking a job selling something they know little about. That just solidifies the need for buyers to be informed.

But it brings up another thought: with so may people unemployed, the labor market is filled with motivated and proven workers. Employers in retail businesses ought to able to hire reliable workers almost at will, but (typically) both the company and the potential employee know that there will be little training on the specific items to be sold.

So wouldn't it make sense that they hire a person who knows at least a little about what's what?

oldfool
March 3, 2012, 10:54 AM
if I know the shop owner, I might mention it in friendly mode
so I probably would
(because the few LGS places here, I know the owners well enough, and they know me well enough)

But anyplace else the jerk-clerk-of-the day says anything that dumb, I just put 'em on ignore; if they don't shut up, I just walk out, and don't come back. Have been known to leave a few car salesmen on the lot talking only to themselves, same way. Quality sales people are a lot like quality guns; most people would rather buy cheap vs. good, be it hardware or employees, especially so in hard times.

Walkalong
March 3, 2012, 10:58 AM
Correct him politely, explain the differences in ammo, and hope he retains the knowledge.

If you tell the manager it may or may not help. Only you can decide if it is warranted, as only you were there.

KodiakBeer
March 3, 2012, 11:21 AM
do you even know what model snub he was showing? maybee the customer asked to see a s&w 340 which is a .357 or a ruger lcr in .357. both look very similar to .38 special variations. the clerk may have been the CORRECT one in this situation.

I've been wondering the same thing and we still haven't been told what model of revolver was being shown.

22-rimfire
March 3, 2012, 11:46 AM
I would probably mention the 38spl versus 357 mag thing out of ear shot of the customer and let the store person take it from there. But I think the customer has a responsibilty to know the basics too before buying a firearm.

sw282
March 3, 2012, 12:01 PM
l give advice on 2 occasions. 1- When asked for. 2-ln life or death

JoeMal
March 3, 2012, 12:16 PM
When I hear stuff like this, I just keep my mouth shut.

I was in Academy looking at some XM855 and a guy stopped and told me not to buy that stuff because "That green stuff will destroy your barrel"


This is what you get in a box store instead of a mom and pop type of shop.HA!

I've heard similar garbage from mom and pop shops too!

This is like trying to explain the difference in .223/5.56 to people who don't know any better....they just don't understand it

Superdave70_02
March 3, 2012, 12:20 PM
I'm not sure of the model. The customer was in front of me and just pointed to the case and said "can I see that 38" the employee reached in the case and pulled it out and said that as he was handing to the customer. When everyone corrected him, the customer put his hands down and the Clerk still had the gun. I think it was a Taurus. When he screwed up the second time after being corrected by no less than five people two times, the other clerk reached over and took the gun from him and put it away. I didn't stick around after that because if he couldn't get it right the second time around there was nothing he could do for me.

I do agree that the final burden of making sure your ammo is right for your gun. But around here alot of the ammo is behind a counter and the clerks should at least know basic calibers so when you ask for 45 colt they don't hand you 45acp or ask for 9mm makarov and receive 9mm luger.

Bovice
March 3, 2012, 12:33 PM
I have never cared what the clerk knows. Whenever I go to buy something important, I've already done the research on it well ahead of time. For me, they're only there to facilitate the sale. For people who don't do things that way... Life is going to be difficult.

I get a kick out of playing dumb sometimes, and asking questions to which I know the right answer. I just want to see what they say.

Hunter125
March 3, 2012, 12:39 PM
, The clerk sold him Hornady Leverevolution 308 marllin instead of 308 win.
No offense to your supervisor, but the guy who owns the gun has to take some responsibility. If I buy the wrong ammo for my gun, it's my own dang fault.

coolluke01
March 3, 2012, 12:39 PM
45 colt they don't hand you 45acp or ask for 9mm makarov and receive 9mm luger.
I don't have a real problem with this. Not everyone knows what the less common ammo types are. I would have a problem if I asked for 45 acp and he gave me 45LC or asked for 9mm and I got 9mm makarov. That would mean he doesn't know anything.

motorcycle-charlie
March 3, 2012, 01:51 PM
Superdave, since we still dont know what make and model the gun was, we have no idea who was right or wrong. this could be a case of an uneducated customer not knowing what he was asking to handle. maybee he just assumes all snubs are .38s. who knows. the other clerk probablly put the gun away because there were 5 other customers chiming in on a matter that did not concern them, causing confusion and unrest in a busy firearms department, which is not good for buisness. this situation may have prevented someone with no firearms handling experience from buying a gun that he had no idea how to operate safely. sometimes it is just better to stand back and let situations like this fizzle out and resolve themselves.

BCRider
March 3, 2012, 02:14 PM
That's the thing. It's quite possible that the gun was actually chambered in .357 and the clerk was simply stating a correct fact for that model of gun rather than messing up the ammo switch info. After all, when it comes to new revolvers in .38 or .357 its safe to say that most ARE chambered in .357.

I suspect that MC Charlie in the post just above this got it right that the second employee just wanted to put the gun away until the whole "show" fizzled out.

mackg
March 3, 2012, 08:48 PM
Magnum ammo will occasionally fit in "Sp" chambers or in old blackpowder guns of hardly related calibers. Also many shooters are not knowledgeable about actual calibers/bores/pressures (Like someone joked above: hey, .38 is bigger than .357, so it's ok!).

Every discussion board and shooting range could actually display a list of compatible or interchangeable calibers. People are shy, proud, or simply don't know they should be asking for that kind of info.

So the more we try to clarify facts the better (It might be hard, I know.... ). As a manager I would want to know about my staff and what was missed during hiring and training.

harmon rabb
March 3, 2012, 10:39 PM
cylinder won't close with 357's. dude can say all he wants. first time they try it, the mistake will be apparent.

awgrizzly
March 4, 2012, 02:42 AM
He had a brain fart and got it bassackwards... you can't fit a .357 into a .38 spc.

BCRider
March 4, 2012, 05:09 AM
Or he handed the guy the gun he pointed at and asked for as a ".38 snubnose" but was actually chambered in .357. When he informed the customer of this he got verbally jumped on by 5 other customers "en masse".

OP, did anyone actually find out what this gun was actually chambered for?

Bubba613
March 4, 2012, 06:53 AM
The clerk was right, the OP was wrong.
What he meant was, if you ream out the cylinder you can safely shoot 357 in a .38. He was boasting about the tensile strength of the steel used in his product. He knew more about it than you.

Or maybe not.

CajunBass
March 4, 2012, 07:04 AM
Well, the first thing I would do is go skipping down the aisle singing to myself..."I know more than HE does...I know more than HE does..." :neener:

ArchAngelCD
March 4, 2012, 07:13 AM
Personally, I think you should mind your own business. It's not your store and it wasn't dangerous so stay out of it!
It sounded so good the first time I said it I wanted to say it again.

I have to agree with the several posts that suggested it was possible the customer actually pointed at a .357 Magnum J frame and the sales clerk was correct and all those who stuck their nose in something that wasn't their business were wrong.

AFDavis11
March 4, 2012, 08:01 AM
if I'm okay with it I usually step in politely and try to help the customer myself. This kind of thing usually happens to me in motorcycle shops, not gun stores.

It's the opinions of gun store clerks I sometimes disagree with. I'm relatively impressed by most of the gun clerks I deal with. They often don't know the answer to a question, but they take the extra time to find out.

In this case I would have spoken to the customer myself.

grendelbane
March 4, 2012, 09:05 AM
People need to be careful. While a .357 magnum "usually" won't chamber in a .38 Special, and a .44 magnum "usually" won't chamber in a .44 Special, it can happen.

Years ago I owned a .44 Special Bulldog. It would indeed chamber some brands of .44 Magnum cartridges. I assume it would be capable of shooting a .44 magnum at least once.

The old Colt .38 longs would also chamber .357 magnums. Another bad combination.

As is a .38 Super in a .38 Special chamber. Fortunately, this one doesn't always work, but it can, and is definitely a high pressure situation in a small frame revolver.

MuleRyder
March 4, 2012, 09:34 AM
Nobody has brought this up, but I wonder if there is a liability issue when a gun store employee gives incorrect information and someone ends up getting hurt?

danez71
March 4, 2012, 10:01 AM
The OP'r said

After I caught my breath me and about 5 other customers quickly corrected him.


And...

After he was corrected he repeated the same thing he said before, at which point the other clerk took the gun from him and put it back up.

I love this place... rather than just answering the question, so many like to jump all over the OP'r and question the validity and intelligence of the OP'r and in this case, "about 5 other customers". And then go on to SPECULATE a 100 other different tangents :scrutiny:

C'mon now.... the correct thing for the employee to say about ammo is to use what the mfg'r manual says to use or whats stamped on the gun. Period.

For those that say ".357 wont fit and close" and/or "he'll figure it out the 1st time he tries to it" they are apparently are OK with sales people misleading or lying to customers (intentionally or not).

If a store wants to try to provide 'extra intelligence' on this they should say something similar to "that gun should also be able to shoot XYZ (or +P)...if thats of interest to you, we can check the manual to be sure."


I think a conversation with the STORE manager is in order. (the guns sales manager could be the problem and not listen becuase he knows everything).

I would specifically NOT name the employee even if I knew because if 1 employee is doing it, there are likely other(s).

motorcycle-charlie
March 4, 2012, 01:00 PM
it appears to me that this incident will never have a proper conclusion. no one knows who was right or wrong because the actual firearm in question cannot be identified. maybee it was a .38 only, maybee it was a .357. none of us know for sure including the OP. i am not questioning the validity or intelligence of the OP by any means. i am just stating, without concrete sureness of the actual make and model, i do not think it is in line to correct someone or go to their superior for an incident like this.

460Kodiak
March 4, 2012, 02:30 PM
I definately would have to correct the sales person. The 38 shouldn't chamber the .357's but still.

I think a scarrier situation would be if he had told him something like "You know, you can shoot .454 Casull out of a standard Taurus Judge. That would probably chamber, wouldn't it? I don't know for sure since I don't own one, but it seems logical. That could be a real catastrophe!

oldfool
March 4, 2012, 02:37 PM
I don't dispute that stance charlie,
but if YOU were there, or I were there, or ArchAngel was there, we would know what specific gun was being looked at.

OP has not replied that I noticed, as to specific model (correction noted, "not sure", missed that), and I don't do not blame OP for lack of clarification, considering some of the posts here

But I am willing to believe OP and whoever the other five customers were to have known what the specific model was. Maybe the shops I hang out at do not oft have six gun dummies for customers all at once who do not know the difference between a 38sp revolver, and a 357 revolver. (Well ok, they do, but those people are all over at the autoloader counter.)

sheesh

PS
autoloader people are not gun dummies, no
but some of them are revolver dummies

eldon519
March 4, 2012, 04:42 PM
The gun community has way too many people who rely on folklore and way too many people who are obsessed with one-upmanship. I wish we could get rid of both.

Superdave70_02
March 5, 2012, 01:27 AM
To make it final I went back to academy and looked at the gun he was shown. It was a Taurus 38 special. I looked it up tonight and the model is 85B2.

awgrizzly
March 5, 2012, 02:11 AM
I stick to my brain fart theory (he just got it backwards) =oP

Meh, I suppose you can cram some 357 and 44 mags into their special counterpart chambers, but something gotta be ain't quite right about it (never thought about the 38 long so shrug). Perhaps the chamber shoulder got fouled up and doesn't seat against the case throat. Or maybe the 357 is a hand load somebody roll crimped. Barring something like this if the case goes past the shoulder something is too big or another too small. But even if the 357 does go in, it's gotta be tight and this should be noticeable. In the end stuff happens, and the gun owner has to know enough to avoid it... like he should know if his gun is a .357 instead of .38spc. A person who takes on a gun, with all the training, safety and responsibility that's associated with it, has to be able to deal with this and not rely on the word of a salesperson with a brain fart (if ya gotta use a hammer to load it something just ain't quite right).

motorcycle-charlie
March 5, 2012, 07:29 AM
To make it final I went back to academy and looked at the gun he was shown. It was a Taurus 38 special. I looked it up tonight and the model is 85B2.
thanks Superdave, being certian of the gun model during the incident, maybee a polite low tone correction to the perspective buyer and the store employee together would have been ok. i still do not think going to the manager or making a scene in the store would have been the right way to go. a little correction to the employee by someone in the know (you) might make him take a second look at what he is actually selling. the customer should at least be halfway educated before making a purchase such as a firearm. unfortunately, that is not always the case. nice footwork to clear up the caliber debate,Superdave.

danez71
March 5, 2012, 09:29 AM
it appears to me that this incident will never have a proper conclusion. no one knows who was right or wrong because the actual firearm in question cannot be identified. maybee it was a .38 only, maybee it was a .357. none of us know for sure including the OP. i am not questioning the validity or intelligence of the OP by any means. i am just stating, without concrete sureness of the actual make and model, i do not think it is in line to correct someone or go to their superior for an incident like this.

But that's exactly what you did.

Should anyone that posts a thread have pictures/finger prints/notorized transcrpits or witness statements/provide lie dectector tests before posting?

It was a fairly simple question that so many chose to questioin the OP rather than answer the question.

What in the world is so hard about that?

Ahhhh I see someone already posted why.....


eldon519 said above The gun community has way too many people who rely on folklore and way too many people who are obsessed with one-upmanship. I wish we could get rid of both.

motorcycle-charlie
March 5, 2012, 09:54 AM
danez71,i was not questioning the intelligence of the op by any means. i was also not trying to engage in one-upmanship. i was just discussing, in a discussion forum, a possible scenerio. it turns out that the op did return to identify the actual gun, and i commended him for this. i did also answer the question. while actually knowing what gun it was, i did say that i thought it is ok th politely correct the employee but not go to the manager. earlier i stated without actually being sure of the caliber, i would not have said anything to anyone. these are just my opinions, i know everyone will vary. never, did i call anyone a liar.

BSA1
March 5, 2012, 11:53 AM
I am always amazed at the level of firearms knowledge on the Internet. In this case the OP is so knowledgable that he was able to instantly recognize from a distance that the firearm the clerk was handling was chambered in 38 Special.

Then the OP, 5 other customers and another employee quickly corrected him in public of his ignorance.

Not content with addressing the matter with the clerk for his mistake the OP now wants him "educated" by management. OP doesn't specify if the "education" is flogging, hanging or simple job termination.:confused:

I must confess I fit the description of the clerk. So many short barrel revolvers nowdays are chambered either in 38 or 357 that I can not recognized the correct chambering without checking to see what is stamped on the barrel. Worse yet I can not tell the difference between a 41 Magnum and 44 Magnum S&W N-Frame revolvers simply by looking at them from a distance.:(

One thing that is curious to me. Why someone that is knowledgable enough to recognize the correct chambering of a revolver at a distance would use the genertic term "snubby" which is somewhat vague and a slang word instead by the Manufacturer and model number?

Certaindeaf
March 5, 2012, 01:05 PM
.One thing that is curious to me. Why someone that is knowledgable enough to recognize the correct chambering of a revolver at a distance would use the genertic term "snubby" which is somewhat vague and a slang word instead by the Manufacturer and model number?
It's fun to say snubby.

CraigC
March 5, 2012, 01:08 PM
A polite correction is all that is necessary.

Perhaps this is the unintended consequence of the manufacturer's catering to the ignorant by advertising all .357-chambered revolvers as ".38/.357". Any shooter worth is salt knows that you can shoot .38Spl in a .357 but not vice-versa. As a dedicated enthusiast, the use of redundant, dumbed-down information does nothing but get on my nerves. ;)

Superdave70_02
March 5, 2012, 02:51 PM
I knew it was a 38 special because of the way the guy asked for it. At the store they have a small card with each gun that has the caliber. When the employee was handling the gun and was corrected he held it in front of his face to get a better look. The area where the employee stands is raised about a foot higher than the rest of the floor so it was easy to see the gun from 4 feet away. I saw where it was placed back into the case when the other employee put it back up.

danez71
March 5, 2012, 09:37 PM
danez71,i was not questioning the intelligence of the op by any means. i was also not trying to engage in one-upmanship. i was just discussing, in a discussion forum, a possible scenerio. it turns out that the op did return to identify the actual gun, and i commended him for this. i did also answer the question. while actually knowing what gun it was, i did say that i thought it is ok th politely correct the employee but not go to the manager. earlier i stated without actually being sure of the caliber, i would not have said anything to anyone. these are just my opinions, i know everyone will vary. never, did i call anyone a liar.

Fair enough... I shouldnt have quoted the 'one upmanship' etc and allude that applied it to you specifically . And youre right.. you did at least make an attempt to answer him before you went into speculation mode.

But generally speaking.... my statement of..
It was a fairly simple question that so many chose to question the OP rather than answer the question.


... is true. Its not hard to see those posts and where I was coming from.

If you enjoyed reading about ""you can shoot 357s out of that 38 special"" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!