Observations, please read.


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mustanger
March 5, 2012, 11:07 AM
Thank You:

These are just my personal observations, impressions I have gotten, reading the posts here.

There is a lot of good advice on this forum. Few disagreements amung you.

Something I have noticed is that when giving or reading advice, sometimes the whole system is not considered, or at least not mentioned.
Everybody has their own way, that works good for them. I am thinking that is how it was way back then. People used what ever method worked good for them. And fortunatly a lot of different ways work good.

For instance, some say hot soap and water, others say cold water. Hot soapy water cleans the greasy stuff out better. But if you use, for instance, Murphy's oil soap in your patch lube, then you already have the soap in the fowling, and plain water works with it to get the greasy or oily stuff out.

Would not work so well if I used cold water on my navy if I toped the ball off with crisco. On the other hand some of the patch lubes do not use greasy oily stuff in them. And some (people) use felt wads instead of grease on thier c&bs.

My thoughts in posting this is that there are those who stay in the background reading and learning what the experts have to say. ( the lack of qotation marks is intentional, you guys are the experts.)
Sometimes it can get confusing if only one part of a system is mentioned. Also it can spark some disagreement.
I really like this forum, and the people here. I have learned a lot of valueable information, and you all have treated this poor dummy really good. THANK YOU.

Mike.

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mykeal
March 5, 2012, 12:01 PM
Hot soapy water cleans the greasy stuff out better. But if you use, for instance, Murphy's oil soap in your patch lube, then you already have the soap in the fowling, and plain water works with it to get the greasy or oily stuff out.
What greasy stuff?

Black powder combustion does not produce greasy or oily stuff. I suppose if you've introduced the greasy/oily stuff yourself via one of the more esoteric patch lube recipes, and if it survived the several hundred degree, high pressure combustion environment, then there might be some, but I've never had anything like that in my guns.

And speaking of high temperature, high pressure environments, I'm 99% sure that the Murphy's Oil Soap does not pass through that to reside unchanged but impregnated in the combustion by-products (fouling).

Just thinking from a systems engineering perspective.

mustanger
March 5, 2012, 12:22 PM
I have seen Crisco mentioned, a lot. However, CVA Patch Lube is rather greasy, and the Hoppes #9+ I have seems greasy enough, when shaken to mix, and kinda oily when not.
However I was refering to recipes I have seen talked about, that others use. As for what I use, it's mainly just the Hoppes, for now. Until I can try the Ballistal. As for recipes, moose milk type, do interest me. And I'm looking for something I can put together for felt pads.
I believe I was refering to systems on a less technical level. More with in the perview of us non-enginering types. :)

wittzo
March 5, 2012, 01:11 PM
You've got to take environmental factors into it. There are guys from all over the world here. What works in a Maine winter won't work in a Mississippi summer and so forth.

I tried all the techniques until I found one that works for me and adjust based on availability and practicality.

Pancho
March 5, 2012, 05:59 PM
Black powder combustion won't create a greasy residue but for those that use the time honored method of toping off the cylinders with Crisco to avoid crossfires sure have a problem. I refer to the "Pawn Star" episode where the "expert" shot the C&B revolver and buttered that gun like a birthday cake.
I personally use correct fitting caps,lubed wads and expect a lead ring when I seat the round and fear no crossfire. Water works fine under those circumstances.

mustanger
March 5, 2012, 06:37 PM
I was thinking of those who stay in the back ground, and try to learn what they can from just reading. Some may not know anything, and are trying to get started. you guys know what you are doing and what you are talking about.
I just thought I would mention it. By know means am I finding fault with anybody, or anything. I sure hope nobody takes offense.
Seems to me that part of the fun is trying the different methods, and finding one that a person likes.

mustanger
March 5, 2012, 06:43 PM
Pancho: I like the felt wads for my navey, picked up on it here before I got the gun, so I skipped the over the ball grease. Fortunately, I think.

MCgunner
March 5, 2012, 07:01 PM
Everyone has their own way of doing things. It don't mean there isn't another way to do it, but once you're set in your ways and you're OLD (except Busyhands), hey, YOU KNOW you're right. ROFL! :D

Lube? Was this thread about lube? I quit using crisco over ball. It just ain't needed. I don't figure even if the ball didn't shave (they do) it'd be hard for a spark to get through all that cornmeal filler. All my caps fit tight, too. I don't fear chain fire any worse. Hell, after a few shots, the crisco is gone on the remaining cylinders, anyway.

ClemBert
March 5, 2012, 08:45 PM
I'm sure we all have a friend or two who will not take good advice NO MATTER WHAT. Sometimes it seems that some people will not try a suggestion because it is a suggestion that they did not think of and it is hard for them to accept better ideas. In the electronics industry we call this phenomenon NIH. Meaning Not Invented Here. Good ideas are often turned down or passed up because someone doesn't like that they didn't "invent" the idea themselves. Thus, they'll go to great effort for find another way to do something.

ontarget
March 6, 2012, 10:49 PM
I too read more than I comment here. Pancho, I saw that episode as well and being a crisco desiple, I almost fell out of my chair. I only use a small dab as a means of keeping the fouling soft. cleans right off. As the OP said the advise here is always useful, and the folks here are great.

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