Wd40 rust inhibitor spray


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chevyforlife21
March 6, 2012, 11:53 PM
Anyone use it on guns yet says 1 year of protection yellow can at wallyworld is it like corrosion x?

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303tom
March 6, 2012, 11:56 PM
WD-40 is one of the best.....................Yes I use it.

hso
March 7, 2012, 12:02 AM
cheveyforlife21,

I'm not sure what you're asking.

Do some folks use WD40? Sure, but for what? It is great at getting moisture out of nooks and crannies, but not the best rust preventative on the market.

Corrosion X and WD40 are not the same.

Look at performance based comparisons of corrosion protection and make you choices based on those.

Jim NE
March 7, 2012, 12:05 AM
You know, I've read somewhere that WD40 wasn't such a great idea for guns. But I can't remember exactly where I read it. Don't know if it's true or not, but you might want to research it, first.

It might br great stuff, I'm just telling you what I've heard.

orionengnr
March 7, 2012, 12:12 AM
WD-40 is one of the best..
...compared to dog piss, maybe.
If you want corrosion protection, read this:
http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html
and this:
http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

Jeff F
March 7, 2012, 12:47 AM
WD 40 makes more then one product these days, I think this is what hes talking about.
http://www.wd40specialist.com/products/corrosion-inhibitor/

Dr.Rob
March 7, 2012, 05:33 AM
For years and years I used this, but over time it can build up a 'shellac' of residue, and unless re-applied a lot it dries out. It displaces water, but does a poor job of lubricating like a real oil. All that spraying can penetrate the unfinished ends of gunstocks/grips.

It will do in a pinch but it is not the best lubricant/preservative.

hardluk1
March 7, 2012, 08:21 AM
Maybe a one shop product like Breakfree CLP would do better for you. I have not had a rust issue in 35 or 40 years I have used it. That with growing up hunting in south florida swamps with blued firearms. maybe its not the best rust stopper but for the average guy it is more than good enough for basic preserve of metal and still be a lubercant and basic cleaner.

bri
March 7, 2012, 08:36 AM
I'd suggest taking a look at Eezox.

Skyshot
March 7, 2012, 08:52 AM
Having worked in the technical industry for 35 years, I have been able to use a multitude of lubricants for various applications. My observations about WD-40 have been that it is a good light machine lubricant as long as excessive heat or cold is not involved. It is not a superior rust inhibitor. Having said that, I have used WD-40 on my bench guns since back in the 70's. with no problems. The varnish only happens when you have had another oil or grease on the firearm as WD-40 which will cause the other lubricant to break down and coagulate. If the firearm is cleaned of all lubricants the WD will not cause any varnish. I never use any grease or heavy oils on any of my firearms as they attract dirt. I use Breakfree or FP-10 for some applications, most general lube is done with marvel mystery oil or ATF fluid. For heavy contact Mobil 1 synthetic is good. For outer weather protection I use a good paste car wax.

Panzercat
March 7, 2012, 09:07 AM
Wasn't somebody using transmission fluid?

X-Rap
March 7, 2012, 09:16 AM
I've used it for years to wipe down my guns after handling or use, I keep an old rag soaked up with the stuff and just wipe down the gun before putting it up. Every now and then I'll spray some more on the rag.
It works as a light solvent as well but there are probably better products for specific chores.
I've never seen it harm a gun and as a rust preventative I can say I don't have rusty guns.

jimmyraythomason
March 7, 2012, 09:30 AM
Here it is again.....<http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid=10700/learn/Gun-Cleaning-Clinic-Knowing-the-Limits-of-Rust-Preventatives>

Vonderek
March 7, 2012, 09:58 AM
I use it on garden tools or multitools or anything that gets hosed down with water after heavy use. For guns, there are better products.

ball3006
March 7, 2012, 10:25 AM
I don't use WD40. It gums up everything I have used it on in the past. I use Breakfree or LPS2, I swear they are the same, as my wipedown lube and rust preventer. It dries after application. I have never had a rust problem using them. If something needs grease, I use Militec grease. If I need oil on something at the range, I have a bottle of Militec oil in my shooting box....chris3

jimmyraythomason
March 7, 2012, 10:51 AM
I've used regular WD-40 since the very early 1970s on all my firearms. No rust,no gum,no problems.

HoosierQ
March 7, 2012, 04:19 PM
Clearly the OP (and the folks at WD-40) are on to something.

+1 on the caveat of old-fashioned WD-40. It most certainly will "shellac" over time. I used it on 6 or 7 razor blades that I had stored in the handle of the good ole Stanley knife. A year or so later they were all glued together with this brown varnish-like substance. A quick soak and rubdown with CLP cleared it right up but it was very gummy inside there beforehand. Stay away from old fashioned WD-40 on guns...at least one that will be stored for very long.

This new product looks to be of interest to us all however. Maybe something like CLP or EEZOX perhaps?

jimmyraythomason
March 7, 2012, 04:26 PM
It most certainly will "shellac" over time. It wont if you dont pool it up and let it dry. If you use it correctly it will not gum.
It wont hurt your guns. New formula or old.

dagger dog
March 7, 2012, 04:45 PM
If you want rust protection during long term storage use Johnson paste wax on the external surfaces.

WD40 works fine for the internals, but it will build up if you keep applying in excess.I like to spray the internals and used compressed air to remove the excess.

jbstratman
March 7, 2012, 04:50 PM
The letters 'WD' stand for 'Water Displacing'. Look it up.

I sprayed down a shot gun years ago with it and it turned to varnish (the wd40 not the shotgun) and had to take it to a gunsmith to get the barrel loose.

Gunzilla is all I use now . . .

WD-40 won't 'hurt' your guns but there are a lot better choices out there today . . .

stl_303
March 7, 2012, 05:08 PM
Generally I like anything with a number it it's name

WD-40
Hoppe's #9
7-Up
Jack Daniel's old No. 7

I recommend them all. not necessarily in that order.

jmr40
March 7, 2012, 05:26 PM
WD-40 is not for use on guns. It will cause you long term problems.

CZguy
March 7, 2012, 05:41 PM
I've used regular WD-40 since the very early 1970s on all my firearms. No rust,no gum,no problems.


Well.........no wonder their stock is holding steady. :D

I had been wondering who was using it all.

AK103K
March 7, 2012, 06:08 PM
I used it for many, many years, without any issues. As jimmyraythomason stated, if you use it properly, you wont have any problems with gumming or varnishing.

These days, I still use it for a bunch of things, but I dont use it much on my guns anymore. While I rarely had rust issues with WD40 (not including guns that were carried here), I think Eezox is a better choice when it comes to rust prevention.

chevyforlife21
March 7, 2012, 10:42 PM
I am talking the specialist stuff it's 12 bucks for a small can

50 cal
March 8, 2012, 12:27 AM
Break free:)

kozak6
March 8, 2012, 04:50 AM
$12 for a small can?

I'd just get a proven rust preventative that costs less.

Why bother with an expensive unknown when you can have proven results?

jimmyraythomason
March 8, 2012, 07:19 AM
Why bother with an expensive unknown when you can have proven results? Exactly! That's why I stick with what I've used for 4 dacades. It works.

Zeke/PA
March 8, 2012, 07:28 AM
While I am a fan of WD-40 I dont use it on my guns.
Good for fishing tackle though especially if you fish Salt Water.

Elkins45
March 8, 2012, 09:01 AM
WD-40 and rust prevention aren't terms that normally belong in the same sentence.

jimmyraythomason
March 8, 2012, 09:18 AM
WD-40 and rust prevention aren't terms that normally belong in the same sentence. The results of Brownell's in shop test of rust preventatives puts RIG grease,Cosmoline and WD-40 as the top performers. Use it or don't as you please(same for ANY product)but it does work and works well.

jimmyraythomason
March 8, 2012, 09:31 AM
Immediately after I remove freshly blued guns/parts from the bluing tank and the stop action tank,I spray them heavily (even submerging small parts) in WD-40 while they are still hot. I briskly buff them with 0000 steel wool soaked in WD-40 and rinse the residue off with WD-40. I blow the excess off with compressed air. it has worked very well for many years.

Elkins45
March 8, 2012, 10:21 AM
I don't doubt that it has, since you are using a water displacing product to displace water. Thats what WD-40 does best.

That's not the same thing as using it for long term storage. I have seen firsthand that liberally soaking guns with it won't prevent rust under moderately humid conditions when stored for more than a few months at a time. My Dad ruined the finish on his High Standard target gun because he thought WD would protect it. No product can prevent rust once it has all evaporated away.

I still haven't found a better product that Johnson's Paste Wax if one is willing to go to a little extra trouble to apply it.

AK103K
March 8, 2012, 10:52 AM
No product can prevent rust once it has all evaporated away.
I never had any issues with WD40 as far as rust, but I usually wiped things down periodically over the year with a rag sprayed with it, whether they were being used or not.

Since switching to Eezox, I have left tools and a couple of guns go over a year in a damp, but somewhat moisture controlled basement, without any sign of rust. For that matter, anything Ive used it on has not shown any signs of corrosion or rust. I have found though, that, like WD40, if you dont follow the directions, you may have issues. Less is always better than more.

buck460XVR
March 9, 2012, 09:00 AM
I am talking the specialist stuff it's 12 bucks for a small can


I've seen it lately in the stores and too wondered if it was as good as it's hype. While the original formula wasn't best long term lube for firearms, it did work well for gettin' the moisture out after hunting all day in the pouring rain. Funny how some folks can't get past the fact that just cause something don't work for them in a particular scenario, that it can(and does in the case of WD40) work well in other applications.

jimmyraythomason
March 9, 2012, 09:16 AM
I haven't tried the new stuff having been very satisfied with the old stuff. Here are a couple of project guns that have spent the winter in my shop. They have had nothing on them except original WD-40 and haven't been touched since last fall. My shop is heated but I didn't turn it on because it did double duty as a fur shed during trapping season. I just took these off the rack,did not even wipe them down,just set them out and took the picture. Please enlarge them as much as you can looking for rust. Remember too I am in Alabama and we have had a very warm and wet winter.

langenc
March 9, 2012, 11:49 PM
Illbet the 'Swamp People' use WD 40.

My mechanic uses a product called "80-twice as good."

qcsmitty
March 10, 2012, 10:38 AM
Avoid WD-40. I've never read good things about it. Some say that it will destroy ammo; others that it, left in a stored gun, turns to gum. Risks are too high.

X-Rap
March 10, 2012, 10:53 AM
I have heard about WD40's magical ability to render ammo inert, seems funny that such a poor performing penetrating oil will work so well on pretty well sealed ammo but is junk on a gun.
It isn't the end all of gun sprays but it has it's place just like so many of the others, for me it's convienience and cost. I can buy it by the case and use it in my shop, home, boat, and gun room.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 10:58 AM
I think most who have responded did not even read the OP's post.

I also saw this at AutoZone the other day. Curious myself.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v647/sgtgeek/product-corrosion.png

hso
March 10, 2012, 11:01 AM
I collect and use carbon steel knives. I use a bike shop product called White Lightning that has wax in suspension. It gets into every nook and cranny and even when evaporated leaves a protective surface. Those of you that are familiar with tool steels know they will rust if you don't take care to prevent it. White Lightning allows me to put my knives up without having to get them out and protect them periodically.

jimmyraythomason
March 10, 2012, 11:07 AM
I have heard about WD40's magical ability to render ammo inert, This is true if sprayed directly on the ammo and given enough time to penetrate past the crimp. I nearly blew a Dan Wesson up when a Super-Vel .357 mag.110grn AP lodged in the barrel and I ALMOST didn't check it(thinking it was a dud). The bullet was lodged in the barrel. Next 5 rounds were varying degrees of malfuctions. All fired but at a very reduced rate,only a couple even reached the target. I had carried the Dan almost constantly,giving it a spray and wipe down every night with WD-40 without unloading it. The remainder of the box of Super-Vel was flawless. Only the six that were in the gun were affected.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 11:09 AM
You guys keep talking about WD-40 and that is not what the OP ask about.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v647/sgtgeek/product-corrosion.png
Exactly! That's why I stick with what I've used for 4 decades....
JimmyRay...hows them bias ply tires still holding up?
Just kiddin..... :)

jimmyraythomason
March 10, 2012, 11:18 AM
Funny how folks like to pay $4.00 a bottle for water to drink when it's the same water that's been here since creation. If something works well,I use it,if it doesn't I look for something that does. I'll most likely try the new WD-40 formula when I run out of the old but not because there was anything wrong with the old.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 11:22 AM
Two different products for two different things JimmyRay.

jimmyraythomason
March 10, 2012, 11:27 AM
Two different products for two different things JimmyRay. No same purpose. The new is supposed to last longer. My responses are to those passing around the same old myths that always pop up when the subject of WD-40 is raised. See post #38 as an example.

BSA1
March 10, 2012, 11:32 AM
This thread should be posted as a sticky.

I read the information on the WD40 website and this is what says;

"WD-40 SPECIALIST™ LONG-TERM CORROSION INHIBITOR protects and lubricates metal parts, blocking rust and corrosion for up to one year outdoors and two years indoors. It is ideal for both preventative maintenance and use in extreme environments such as high humidity. Safe to use and 50-state VOC compliant, it provides non-drying lubrication that stays where you spray it."

No mention of use on firearms.

I also looked at the images on the spray can on their website. There is no image of a gun.

That is two places where they omit using the product on firearms.

I am showing my age but back in the 1970's LEO's commoningly used WD40 on their guns. We used in in my department especially when the weather was bad. We would come off-duty, give our guns a hose down inside and out and maybe again before going on duty and stick back in the holster til our next shift.

In the mid to late 1970's a state police department (Illinois maybe but time has faded the memory) put out a warning about use of WD40 after they had three seperate shooting incidents where the officer's revolver failed to fire. They traced the cause to WD40 gumming up in the action and the cold weather thicking it. There were occasions that the ink in pen would freeze while I was out working a accident.

That was enough for me to quit using it.

Since that time there have been much more effective oils/lubes for firearms made. We jumped on Break-Free when it was introduced as a replacement for WD-40.

I fail to understand why some shooters refuse to use more effective proven products for their firearms maintenance. To me this is the same menality of using straight 30 weight motor oil in your modern car because 30 weight has always been good enough. This totally disregards that the manufacturers recommended oil costs the same.

I have several cans of WD40 in the garage and barn. It gets used a lot on tools and farm equipment. But it never gets used on my firearms.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 11:37 AM
No same purpose. The new is supposed to last longer. My responses are to those passing around the same old myths that always pop up when the subject of WD-40 is raised. See post #38 as an example.
LOL...One is formulated as a penetrating oil and one as a rust inhibitor. What the OP and some of us are talking about is the rust inhibitor as pictured.
Nobody here is asking anything about using WD-40 on a firearm. What is being ask is about the rust inhibitor not WD-40. Two totally separate products for two totally separate things.
THE RUST INHIBITOR IS NOT REPLACING WD-40. IT IS A NEW PRODUCT SPECIFICALLY FOR INHIBITING RUST NOT A PENETRATING OIL AS WD-40 IS DESIGNED FOR.

jon_in_wv
March 10, 2012, 11:40 AM
Walmart also sells Birchwood Casey Barricade. It is a much better product than WD40 or I would wager the stuff you are asking about and its is designed to inhibit rust on firearms. I've used it for years now with NO rust and no residue on my weapons.

jimmyraythomason
March 10, 2012, 11:41 AM
have several cans of WD40 in the garage and barn. It gets used a lot on tools and farm equipment.So,how much rust and gum do you have on your farming tools and equipment?

HOOfan_1
March 10, 2012, 11:45 AM
Avoid WD-40. I've never read good things about it. Some say that it will destroy ammo; others that it, left in a stored gun, turns to gum. Risks are too high.

Yet other have said they have used it for several decades and have had no problems.

The internet is great for finding 180 degree opposite information.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 11:46 AM
Maybe pictures will help. See any difference? Anybody? Bueller?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v647/sgtgeek/WD40.png
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v647/sgtgeek/product-corrosion.png

OK....so the first picture is the updated WD-40 we all know and love and have for years. That is not what this thread is about. The OP is asking about the product in the 2nd picture that has nothing to do with the WD-40 "of 40 years ago" "used on farm animals" et al :)

X-Rap
March 10, 2012, 11:50 AM
It looks like you pay twice as much for half the product, I might give it a try but for that money you are into the boutique lubes and solvents so there might be better choices. The old stuff really has worked fine for me so to answer the OP, I say give it a try and see if it really is better.
The thing is, few of us will take the time to test it in a way that is truly conclusive so I doubt if there will be an answer as to which is best but it's clear which is most expensive.

dastardly-D
March 10, 2012, 11:53 AM
The USMC taught me to use WD-40 in 1965,and I still use it today.It will penetrate rust to break a bolt free.You can use it to prevent rust on a stored gun and it hasn't damaged any of my wood stocks ever.Spray it on your whole weapon and then wipe it off leaving a light coating.Back in the day they had us using it to clean our bullets and mg belts,not a good idea.It will leave a slight residue gathering sand,dust,and whatever small particles that might jam up your mg belt.It's cheap,use it to spray thru your trigger housing and then wipe or blow it out.It worked great in the Vietnam enviroment,it will work great in the home enviroment and for the standard American hunter.As to how it works in the Sand Boxes,ask a grunt how it worked over there ? Expieriance speakes louder than opinions....

1911Jeeper
March 10, 2012, 11:53 AM
WD-40 is in the garage and never comes near my firearms. It is neither a lubricant nor a rust inhibitor. WD stands for water displacement. It more like a solvent than a lubricant and it will dry out.

Rust inhibitor products usually contain wax like solids dissolved in them. After a period of time, the solvents dry out and the waxy stuff remains as an even coating on the surface.

I work in a machine shop and we use LPS rust inhibitor products. Some customers specify their parts be sprayed or dipped after machining. The waxy coating seals the metals and prevents rust. The waxy coating is also sticky and requires a solvent to remove.



To store firearms, you should use a good quality gun oil, re-applied as often as needed, and a dry storage area. BreakFree CLP works well for me. I wipe down my firearms every spring and fall with CLP. I use it on my work tools also. Silicone treated gun socks that can breath are also a good idea.

Lubricants and solvents of all types should kept away from your ammunition.


.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 11:54 AM
Jeeper...that's nice but nobody is talking about WD-40.
I give up.
OP...your on your own Pal.........

Chindo18Z
March 10, 2012, 12:00 PM
Back in an age of Disco, revolvers in police holsters, and 8-track tapes...everyone in my military unit routinely used copious amounts of spray WD-40 (the old stuff) on all of our weapons and metal equipment.

It was a standard ingredient for cleaning parties after coming in from the wet and rainy field. It got applied to mortars, machine guns, pistols, rifles, shotguns, radio bodies, binoculars, recoilless rifles, crew served gun sights, bayonets, knives, entrenching tools, submachine guns, night vision devices, etc. We used it by the pallet load.

The little mini-cans were carried in rucksack kits for cleaning while occupying patrol bases in the field.

We never considered it as a lube, but rather as a water displacing cleaner and coating. WD-40 was sprayed in all nooks and crannies and also applied with a rag to all metal surfaces after initial cleaning with either hot water or a solvent (usually issue Rifle Bore Cleaner but often spray carb cleaner). This would be followed by generous application of LSA military gun oil (later superseded by CLP).

End result (properly applied) = no rust. Ever. The punishment for allowing a rusty weapon was severe and usually extended to the group...thus insuring that leaders and peers ruthlessly inspected all weapons.

This was SOP in the Coastal Pacific Northwest with generally constant rain, snow, humidity, or salt water exposure. WD-40 also worked well in the southwestern deserts of the US, the bitter winter cold of the Great Lakes region, the coastal surf zones of California and Florida, the swamps of the SE, and the jungles of Panama.

My M1911A1 was often carried for days (or even weeks) inside a wet leather holster while in the field. The pistol was liberally coated (inside and out) with WD-40, with actual lube applied on the appropriate moving surfaces. No rust.

We didn't "know" that you shouldn't use WD-40 on weapons. Somehow our weapons managed to work despite years of spraying WD-40 onto them. :rolleyes:

On the other hand, once CLP came into widespread use, I pretty much quit using WD-40 on mil and personal weaponry, because CLP did it all. I participated in the Army's testing of CLP under rather extreme conditions and became a personal convert to its use (to this day).

For me, WD-40 is reserved for cleaning personal weapons which have been dunked in water or become rain soaked. Even then, its just something to use during cleaning, with the excess getting wiped off prior to being replaced by CLP.

I HAVE ZERO EXPERIENCE WITH THE NEW PRODUCT. ;)

X-Rap
March 10, 2012, 12:04 PM
Since we all have a can of the old stuff and we are demanding the reading of labels take a look at the back of the can on the old formula.
I don't have a can of the new but when I see one I bet they list firearms as an application.
The old stuff claims to
Lubricate
Clean
Protect
Penetrate
Displace Moisture
It has been doing that for as long as I can recall, some of these uses are not as effective as some purpose made products but as an all around it does a pretty good job.
As far as it ruining ammo and causing a hazardous situation, don't spray anything that claims to be a penetrant directly on ammo or allow it to puddle in places like chambers or cylinders.

jcwit
March 10, 2012, 12:05 PM
I went to the companies site and to the mds sheet, Very possible its something similar to this

http://www.fluid-film.com/company.html

This is a super rust inhibitor, non drying and works fantastic on vehicles in the rust belt.

Right Sarg, this WD-40 is nothing even remotely related to the ealier WD-40 other than being made by the same company.

1911Jeeper
March 10, 2012, 12:05 PM
Summarizing Chindo18z:

WD-40 to displace dampness, and gun oil for storage of firearms.

dastardly-D
March 10, 2012, 12:11 PM
Yes Chindo, X-Rap and others,I guess we just didn't know better,either did our weapons. Live and let live,there is more than one way to skin a cat though......:D

jcwit
March 10, 2012, 12:12 PM
and gun oil for storage of firearms.

Mobil 1 works well.

Chindo18Z
March 10, 2012, 01:07 PM
1911 Jeeper: WD-40 to displace dampness, and gun oil for storage of firearms.

Exactly.

To which I will add: Gun oil for function (lubrication of moving parts).

jcwit
March 10, 2012, 01:29 PM
I suppose if one wishes to spend $30/$40 bucks for a qt. of "spec" gun oil, go for it, I find synthetic motor oil to work/hold up just as well.

Now then, back to WD-40 Rust Inhibitor Spray.

BSA1
March 10, 2012, 02:11 PM
So,how much rust and gum do you have on your farming tools and equipment?

It depends on how long the tool has been sitting around unused. It is really useful for equipment that sits outdoors.

BSA1
March 10, 2012, 02:23 PM
Yes Chindo, X-Rap and others,I guess we just didn't know better,either did our weapons. Live and let live,there is more than one way to skin a cat though......

I didn't either until reports of LEO revolvers gumming up and failing to fire started. But in all fairness all of my firearms must go bang the first time and every time. I will not tolerate a gun that is just for target use or plinking misfiring.

LIke I said the manufacturer does not mention use of WD40 CORROSION INHIBITOR for firearms on its website or front of can.

But I don't see this thread changing anybodies mind and it is your life not mine.

jmr40
March 10, 2012, 03:20 PM
Avoid WD-40. I've never read good things about it. Some say that it will destroy ammo; others that it, left in a stored gun, turns to gum. Risks are too high.

Yet other have said they have used it for several decades and have had no problems.



Just because SOME have used it successfully does not prove it is a good idea. Many others, myself included have seen the negative effects of using it on firearms. I've never been struck by lighteing, but know it is a bad idea to dance in the street during a thunderstorm. I know that sometimes folks who do foolish things are struck by lightening, yet many do foolish things for years with no ill effects. Those that continue to use WD-40 on firearms will eventually have problems.

While it MAY work for a while, there are simply MUCH better choices that don't really cost any more.

The newer version of WD-40 may well work. I simply don't know enough about it, but using the older version is simply taking a bigger risk than I'm willing to take. Especially when there are other products just as readily available that are priced the same and are designed specifically for the job. If it were WD-40 or nothing, I'd use until I could get the right tool for the job.

The Sarge
March 10, 2012, 04:52 PM
To the OP..........
I went into town for a bit this afternoon and Home Depot had this new Rust Inhibitor right next to the WD-40 (both old and new versions of WD-40 were next to this Rust Inhibitor). I'll try it out on a test area on my tractor and let you know. Maybe I will PM you so these guys can continue their WD-40 discussion and we will not interrupt them.

Chindo18Z
March 10, 2012, 07:22 PM
I didn't either until reports of LEO revolvers gumming up and failing to fire started.

I have no doubt about that occurrence. That reporting is exactly what got me to drop use of WD-40 on my personal weapons.

But consider the context. Repeatedly spraying WD-40 into revolver lock work over a period of months or years would probably provide the ideal situation for that accumulation of varnish and grime. I've got long owned revolvers that have never seen the side plate removed. I know very few cops that ever detail disassembled their Colts or Smiths back in the day. They'd have an outwardly sparkling and well oiled gun...with a hidden crust of WD-40 varnish, gunpowder residue, dirt, and lint clogging up the lock work and cylinder mechanism. Same thing with a lot of patrol shotguns that received only cursory care. Not a good recipe for reliability.

During my military use of WD-40, our weapons were detail disassembled, rigorously cleaned, generously oiled, and armorer inspected...almost on a weekly basis. Thus, we never had a problem with WD-40 residue. The weapons were cleaned too frequently and in too detailed a manner to ever suffer from such buildup.

I quit using WD-40 years ago for anything but displacing water and acting as a penetrant on screws and tight parts. It's lubrication properties are just about nil. I'd use it on my personal weapons if it were the only thing available...but that's about it.

On the other hand, WD-40 is not some nefarious super glue that will deadline your weapon through occasional application or less than frequent maintenance. If you choose to use it, wipe off the excess and apply some actual gun oil as well. And don't spend 10 years spraying it into the hidden lockwork of your Python. ;)

I also wouldn't spray WD-40 onto cartridges or allow excess to drip over primers, although testing has shown that WD-40 actually does not magically penetrate and disable most sealed primers. It's not remotely as bad as internet myth has made it out to be, but...letting any penetrant near a cartridge (which might deaden a rare primer) is just not a good idea for a defensive, competition, or hunting weapon. Somebody on one of the firearms forums submerged live rounds in WD-40 a couple of years ago...and noted an extremely low percentage of ignition failures when the ammo was test fired. These were rounds left submerged for days. Almost all of them fired normally. Maybe someone has the thread or a link?

We used to spray the stuff on belts of wet machine gun ammo without issue. All the rounds went bang.

BIGGBAY90
March 10, 2012, 07:37 PM
Use gun oil

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