Wildlife protection Out West- Handgun/Long gun


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gadsden9
March 12, 2012, 09:49 PM
I'd like to make sure I am protected for a hiking/camping trip out West. I am not scheduled for it but my next gun will be for this purpose. I currently have a 12 Ga 870 Magnum, a Kahr PM 9 9mm and a G23 40. Is the 870 enough? And if so- what ammo? Slugs? And if the 870 is leaning against a tree, and I have to resort to what is hanging on my side, what would I want to stop a charging creature at close range? (Like a bear?) I'm pretty sure if all I have is the 9mm or the 40 I should file the sights smooth so when the bear sticks it up my rear it doesn't hurt as much. So I think the 9 and 40 are not even worth taking. How about a conversion barrel for the 40 to make it 357 SIG. I think still not near enough, right?

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Alaska444
March 12, 2012, 09:54 PM
Where out west is the first question? If outwest means WY,MT or Idaho, then you need to up the caliber of handgun to fight your way back to the shotgun. The 12 ga at close hand is a great decision. If in that territory that has grizzly, then .44 magnum is the minimum hand gun I would consider as I do when up in Idaho.

You may wan't something more than just a two legged predatory self defense option which usually means starting at a minimum of .357 magnum with 180 gr bullets. Just my two cents.

SleazyRider
March 12, 2012, 10:01 PM
If in that territory that has grizzly, then .44 magnum is the minimum hand gun I would consider as I do when up in Idaho.

With the exception of Alaska, of course, I was under the impression that the grizzly bear is extant only in Glacier National Park and Yellowstone. Are they elsewhere as well?

gadsden9
March 12, 2012, 10:05 PM
Hey Alaska- I have no immediate plans, I just want to be ready so when I plan the trip I'll already have the firepower. So- to the question "where out west?"- would "anywhere- up to the biggest game in North America" be too nieve? Basically- I'll be looking for opportunities to go, and want to be prepared. At the same time I'd rather not carry some massive thing like a 500 S&W. On the other hand, if that is the reality of what it takes to survive such an attack, that's what I'll do. As a side note- I am very familiar with carrying a pistol strong side and spare mags weak side. Whatever I go with- I'd like to get a pistol if possible.

Jorg Nysgerrig
March 12, 2012, 10:13 PM
then you need to up the caliber of handgun to fight your way back to the shotgun.
Fighting your way back to the shotgun to protect yourself from wildlife? Are you being being flanked by a squad of tactical assault bears while mountan lion snipers lay down suppressive fire?


I'd rather not carry some massive thing like a 500 S&W.
You mentioned taking an 870. I consider an 870 much more massive than a 500 S&W.

Sam Cade
March 12, 2012, 10:19 PM
Are you being being flanked by a squad of tactical assault bears

Hey man, that aint funny. TABs are not to be taken lightly.


...especially Ranger TABs.

Alaska444
March 12, 2012, 10:28 PM
Today, 07:01 PM #3
SleazyRider
Member

Join Date: February 25, 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska444
If in that territory that has grizzly, then .44 magnum is the minimum hand gun I would consider as I do when up in Idaho.
With the exception of Alaska, of course, I was under the impression that the grizzly bear is extant only in Glacier National Park and Yellowstone. Are they elsewhere as well?
__________________
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMbAT...eature=related

There are 5 grizzly recover zones in the lower 48 which brings them into contention in Idaho, Wyoming, Montana and possibly even WA state with one confirmed sighting in the northern Cascades.

We have had two confirmed bears killed in the last three years south of the I-90, one only a little over 10 miles away from Coeur d'Alene, ID in a place called Rose Lake. The population is growing rapidly and there have been increased grizzly encounters and attacks in the last decade. Anywhere in these areas is now considered grizzly territory once again.

gadsden9
March 12, 2012, 10:29 PM
Jorg- In theory the 870 could always be attached to me. In practice, it may not be the case. Ideally the 870 could be deployed but if not, I'd like to have something that would be strapped on my hip.

dprice3844444
March 12, 2012, 10:39 PM
http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/76635-1.html shotgun scabbard

Alaska444
March 12, 2012, 10:40 PM
Today, 07:05 PM #4
gadsden9
Member

Join Date: February 8, 2012
Location: NC
Posts: 8
Hey Alaska- I have no immediate plans, I just want to be ready so when I plan the trip I'll already have the firepower. So- to the question "where out west?"- would "anywhere- up to the biggest game in North America" be too nieve? Basically- I'll be looking for opportunities to go, and want to be prepared. At the same time I'd rather not carry some massive thing like a 500 S&W. On the other hand, if that is the reality of what it takes to survive such an attack, that's what I'll do. As a side note- I am very familiar with carrying a pistol strong side and spare mags weak side. Whatever I go with- I'd like to get a pistol if possible.

As I have noted in quite a few posts here and at TFL, I live in Northern Idaho about 6 months out of the year and hope to move from CA to Portland so I can be in the Pacific Northwest year round.

When out and around in the woods, I have my .44 magnum Ruger SRH and if really out in the boonies, I throw my .444 Marlin over my shoulder. My EDC when I am outside of CA is a Ruger SP101 that I usually pocket carry. I have that with me as well since it just fits. Why not. Maybe a bit of over kill, but we now have large packs of Mackenzie Valley Canadian wolves that get quite large as well. In any case, in the woods, I always have at least the .44 and my .357 SP101 with the largest bullets available from Buffalo Bore for each.

I am planning on getting a Winchester .44 magnum in a few more weeks as a dedicated truck/camp gun. They have a lot of black bear that can get fairly large and moose up in Idaho now as well as a bunch of mountain lions. Most places out west will have both black bear and mountain lions, so that should be in your consideration.

I hope this helps and enjoy your time out west.

God bless,

Alaska444

Dr.Rob
March 12, 2012, 10:48 PM
If you are genuinely hiking you don't need a long gun and 2 backups.

A handgun is no guarantee against a bear, but I'd start at .357 as a minimum for a 'camp gun.' A small frame 357 in 5 or 6 shot is plenty for walking around.

Leave the shotgun for camping out of your truck and read up on avoiding bears in your campsite.

kbbailey
March 12, 2012, 11:18 PM
I always wanted a S&W Mountain Gun for that chore, but have been using my 7-shot .357 Taurus 627 'til I find one.

loneviking
March 12, 2012, 11:45 PM
What are you hunting? You could just buy a Marlin 45-70 guide gun that will kill most anything in the west. Ammo is a bit expensive though, unless you reload.

montanaoffroader
March 13, 2012, 12:30 AM
The 870 would make a good camp gun, but is probably a bit much for casual hiking. When I head into the Rockies I usually pack a 5.5" Super BlackHawk, and when I want to go a bit lighter I carry my 4" King Cobra. My brother-in-law carries a G20 10mm, it seems to be a decent gun but ammo can be a bit tough to come by in some of the smaller towns.

If you are really worried about bears, then pick up some bear spray. It is small and light which means easy to carry, so it is less likely to be left behind. Also, a G20 like my BIL has would probably be a good choice for you, since you already own a Glock and know your way around them. Just make sure you bring enough ammo with you.

Agsalaska
March 13, 2012, 12:41 AM
Unless you are going to be around Brown bears, there is nothing in the west that a .357 couldnt easily handle. I suppose the other real threats would be Black Bears, Moose, and Mountain Lions. None of them would stand a chance against a .357.

Mace or bear spray is not a bad idea either.

Alaska444
March 13, 2012, 01:10 AM
Today, 07:48 PM #11
Dr.Rob
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Join Date: December 23, 2002
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 9,905
If you are genuinely hiking you don't need a long gun and 2 backups.

A handgun is no guarantee against a bear, but I'd start at .357 as a minimum for a 'camp gun.' A small frame 357 in 5 or 6 shot is plenty for walking around.

Leave the shotgun for camping out of your truck and read up on avoiding bears in your campsite.
__________________
Former TFL Moderator. "Guess you broke into the WRONG rec room!" ;)

Very true Rob. Since I have the SP101 as my EDC, it is my constant companion even when I throw the .44 mag over my shoulder with cross carry bandolier holster. Hunting is the main time I would have all three since indeed, the wolf problem in Idaho is getting a bit extreme. Several cases already of hunters and folks out on horses circled by wolves and had to shoot their way back to their camp. In that case, you will need much more ammo than ordinary bear defense. Once again, yes, a bit extreme but there are cases to justify such a practice in northern Idaho unfortunately. Another attack took place last year against a bow hunter who shot the wolf with her .44 magnum side arm at 10 feet.

http://www.skinnymoose.com/bbb/2011/09/28/idaho-woman-attacked-by-wolf/

Dr.Rob
March 13, 2012, 02:30 AM
I've come across what I was SURE were wolf tracks in N Central Colorado. (Area 8) I had hunted there years and never seen any groups of large canine tracks and suddenly one year they were everywhere. I glimpsed one that same season but never got a close look. Ditto for mountain lion, which honestly spook me a lot more than wolves or bears.

I almost always carry a sidearm hunting. And its usually legal for taking whatever game I am hunting, usually a .44 mag.

Backpacking or fishing a snubby .357 comes along.

Always keep a firearm of some kind in camp (on me or near me) even when truck camping. That often means a long gun.

pintler
March 13, 2012, 09:22 AM
With the exception of Alaska, of course, I was under the impression that the grizzly bear is extant only in Glacier National Park and Yellowstone. Are they

They certainly leak across the Canadian border into WA - I have seen one in the Pasaytens. 'Yellowstone' really means 'the greater Yellowstone area' - that includes the Beartooths, the Absorakas, and the Wind River Range, etc. 'Glacier' includes the surrounding areas - Bob Marshall wilderness, Cabinet Mountains, and so on.

+1 on the recommendation for spray - it weighs a half pound and costs $40. It has advantages and disadvantages relative to a gun; for the weight and price there is no reason to forgo the advantages. Carry it in a holster, not in a pack pocket.

As to guns, a long gun - 12 gauge, 45/70, 375, or whatever is the gold standard, but that's a lot to carry. If you're horse packing, great, but on foot I'm certainly not going to do it. The usual handgun is 44 mag. Some people like 10mm. Both of those are available in lightweight guns for foot travellers. On horseback, or if you're only walking a couple of miles fishing, then those and anywhere up works. You want hardcast bullets in any of them.

JustinJ
March 13, 2012, 09:28 AM
Bear spray will be a better defense against any critter you may encounter except people.

WardenWolf
March 13, 2012, 09:32 AM
Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan .454 Casull? It's big, but it's manageable, and much more portable than a full-size Super Redhawk. It's been known to drop even grizzly bears, and has saved numerous lives in that role.

Pilot
March 13, 2012, 09:36 AM
In the Colorado Rockies I usually carried a 4 5/8 inch Ruger Blackhawk, .357 magnum or a service size 9MM like a CZ-75 or Browning Hi Power. I was more concerned with two legged predators.

Keb
March 13, 2012, 10:57 AM
Better stick to the handgun. Why? The Game & Fish may consider you to be a hunter out of season with a long gun.

Furncliff
March 13, 2012, 11:49 AM
.357Mag and Buffalo Bore loads + a "good" bear spray. Don't work yourself up about the wild animal threats, lightning is a bigger maim/killer.

ChefJeff1
March 13, 2012, 01:58 PM
Hiking with a shotgun.........really! A hiker should be so lucky to see a bear. I wouldn't worry about it. I hike many many hours in the mountains of Idaho and have seen 2 bears in 13 years. 1 was on the ski mountain, the other was by the road during a huge forest fire.

I've never actually seen a wolf but have seen sign.

I do hike with a gun, always. I am more afraid of moose than anything else. They are generally at lower elevation.

gbran
March 13, 2012, 10:33 PM
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y145/gbran/50BMG.jpg

WardenWolf
March 14, 2012, 12:34 AM
Gbran, please tell me that's not real.

paintballdude902
March 14, 2012, 12:44 AM
did you think about a 10mm? 10mm and a 12 ga would be a pretty good combo to carry for a weekend in the woods. 10mm is pretty much a .357 except you have more rounds.

gbran
March 14, 2012, 12:45 AM
It's a photoshop.

Hocka Louis
March 14, 2012, 08:45 PM
If you can find hard bullets in a very powerful .40 S&W cartridge I'd probably be OK with the gun I already know and own (known) if I were you. Like these maybe?

http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=117

CFletch08
March 15, 2012, 11:51 AM
I bought a 45-70 handi-rifle for this purpose. Cheap and pretty light for the caliber. Its also very compact.

Sam Cade
March 15, 2012, 12:06 PM
Like these maybe?
http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=117


Whoa. Standard 180gr FMJ at standard 180gr velocities and they only want $1.33 per round plus shipping costs.:uhoh:

galena
March 15, 2012, 02:54 PM
First comment: I do not live in Grizzley bear country. However, I have lived in the Colorado mountains all my life except my military time. I have roamed some pretty rough country and wilderness areas. I have carried everything from a two bladed pocket knife to a .338 Win Mag. I have never had to defend myself from any wild animal. Now days one should be more concerned about two legged predators than the local wild life. Consequently I never venture out anymore without a .38 or .45 somewhere on my person. Keep shootin'

hariph creek
March 15, 2012, 04:39 PM
I go out, I'm loaded for bear. I also understand I'm under more danger from two legged predators. But, hey, why not pack what'll take down the biggest threat in my neck of the woods.
Around here, it's black bear. .357 and 10mm, with fast, hard cast, heavy for caliber bullets, should work.
Since, it appears that you like pistols over revolvers, get a 10mm. I personally like the 1911 flavor. Glock 20's are probobaly the better choice, though. (cheaper, easier to find, capacity, weight, etc...)I find the large frame Glocks (.45&10) don't fit my hands well.
But, for brown/grizzly, .44mag is the minimum I'd entertain.
Rifles are probobaly better than shotguns. If a shotgun's what you have, it's best.
Running a clean camp and being ''bear aware'' are best.
If you're where there are grizzly, you could have moose. I'd worry more about moose.
I'd worry more about people than moose or bear.
I'd worry more about weather, injury or getting lost. (not that I get lost) Than people, moose or bear.
And then there's snakes, and scorpions, and ticks, and lightning, and floods, and wolves, and badgers, and falling trees, and rock slides, and avalanche, and fire, and mosquitos, and horse flies, and running out of whiskey, and forgetting the toilet paper, and those biting little ants, and bees, and sunburn, and nettles, and blisters and, and, and...
Gotta go, I'm locking my doors now.

nickn10
March 15, 2012, 11:54 PM
First comment: I do not live in Grizzley bear country. However, I have lived in the Colorado mountains all my life except my military time. I have roamed some pretty rough country and wilderness areas. I have carried everything from a two bladed pocket knife to a .338 Win Mag. I have never had to defend myself from any wild animal. Now days one should be more concerned about two legged predators than the local wild life. Consequently I never venture out anymore without a .38 or .45 somewhere on my person. Keep shootin'
I've lived in Colorado since 1965, hiked, camped, hunted and fished just about everywhere in the state. ONLY ONCE was I ever charged by a wild animal, a pretty pissed coyote that had claimed a pheasant I shot that went down about 75 yards after being hit. I finished hunting the fence line and after about 15 min got to where I figured the pheasant would be in some brush. Well I guess the coyote thought it was his and he charged at me twice, the second time I actually hit him on the head with the barrel of the shot gun. After about 15 seconds here he comes again, I finally had to shoot him. I felt sorry for the poor thing but after checking him out he was big and not outwardly starving. I thought he might have been rabid so I just left him lay where I shot him. To answer the original poster, yes I occasionaly carried a 4" S&W 357 mag but honestly I never expected to need it for protection from 4 legged inhabitants of the mountains, I did shoot a couple of snakes but they really didn't deserve to be shot.

sub-moa
March 16, 2012, 01:42 AM
For the past dozen years we've spent 3 wks each year in WY/MT/ID, general bumming around with many day (7-8a to 8-9p in summer) long hikes. Usually fly into SLC, jump into 4X4 rental then immediately head north...but have flown into Cody, Bozeman and Boise as well. Used to have to deal with National Parks "No Guns" rules, which were a PITA...that combined with air travel with guns(s) caused me to choose a single pistol reasonably suitable for around town...and on the trial. Already had my Glock 29 10mm which is very concealable, controllable for quick follow-up shots, I'm very familiar with (carry/teach) Glocks, it allowed quick disassemby/assembly going in and out of National Parks and worked just fine with DT 200 WFNGC Hardcast for hikes and 175 STHP for civilization...all in one pistol.

Even with the DT stompers though, the 10mm is lighter than optimum for the likes of one griz we walked up upon (40-50m) before we were able to back-off and another that spooked the horses on a trail ride just outside the YNP east entrance above The Tepee...to say nothing of an annoyed female moose w/ calf that caused us to abandon a hike early in GTNP. Glad I had it 2 years ago between GTNP and YNP when a whitetail blew by us as a blur...followed immediately by a big tom on the same course at a dead run...damn they're fast :what:. I'd have preferred my 4" 629 w/ DT .44Mag WFNPGC on the trails, but it's more than I want in a town gun, so I'll take my chances and split the difference. Besides, as has already been pointed out, predators w/ 2 legs are likely to be more of an issue than the cute furry creatures ;)...

KenW.
March 16, 2012, 12:22 PM
I'ved lived in the west most of my adult life. I've hunted, camped, and ATV'd all over and always felt pretty safe with a .22 mag derringer in the front pocket. How many wildlife attacks do you see in the news? At least attacks that weren't insigated by the victim?

When there is a chance of an encounter I'll holster a full-size handgun, but that's quite rare. Mabey next time it'll be a Bond Arms 45LC/410 derringer.

dagger dog
March 16, 2012, 01:59 PM
Look at the many photos of our armed forces, the ones that show urban tactics.
Aren't they all carrying long guns at the ready position ?

Now back to the boonies ,here you come down a trail, and you know for a fact you could encounter something that's big enough to see you as a food source.

Will you sacrifice your peace of mind and saftey for a few ounces or pounds of weight savings ?

Our troops are humping 40 + pounds of equipment not counting the weapon,and they are hunting predators that carry a lot more than teeth and claws.

Why should you handicap yourself ?

KenW.
March 16, 2012, 02:13 PM
Wildlife in the US do not go out and specifically hunt humans as food source. Though the odd mountain lion may pounce on a California jogger once in a while. Just about everything else is Hollywood driven. Generally wildlife is at least as scared of you as you are of them. Isn't that true in the midwest also?

Wildlife is not a threat where I live and recreate here in the second driest state in the union. If it were I'd equip myself approriately.

sierrabravo45
March 16, 2012, 03:54 PM
I would do bear spray.

I spent the last 1.5 years out of 3 living in a wall tent in the AK bush surrounded by a bear fence. I spend most of my time in the front/backcountry in NW Montana the rest of the year. Carried a 870 because I had too in AK. They are a pain in the azz. In that amount of time 1.5 years, I shot over 1 bear at 10 yards (he didn't care), shot over one at 30 yds, he ran, and had incidents with a few more that yelling made them run scared.

If the bear at 10 yards wanted me, I would be dead right now. I did not have time to get a gun into play, especially a shotgun. I had my bear spray out first and then went for the shotgun. A pistol might have been better, but maybe not. I was working, looked up and a bear was there. Spray was out, and I went for the shotgun slowly.

In the lower 48, I will SOMETIME come across bears hunting or while hiking. Spray is easier to get to, works on moose, pissed off bulls (cows), and two legged creatures. I carry two cans. One on my hip, and one spare with me.

If I am in certain areas, I carry Spray and a .44 Mag. Still prefer Spray, but a 300 Grain Bullet tends to make a statement. Shotgun is good, but its heavy and you won't carry it. If you do for some reason get a shotgun. Get the Black Magic Magnums. They do a number on bears. Worked with a guy in AK who had to shoot 3 of them that were in a Cabin in town. Photos told all the details. One was shot in the head, and penetration was no problem, the other two were shot in shoulder/chest, and results were also very good.

hermannr
March 16, 2012, 04:22 PM
It has been my experience that being aware is more important than what you carry. I have hiked with large dogs, and small dogs...small dogs work best..especially good luck with dachshunds..very alert, and can be very quick with a heart that is 10X their body size.

They become enough of a distraction to the preditor that you can think before you act. What I normally carry in the woods is an old Colt .38 target or a high standard .22. Both work good to pop a grouse in the head, and that is what they are usually used for.

I sometimes carry an old 7.62X25 CZ52 instead...not for grouse, but becasue they are loud, extremely loud (make sure you are wearing hearing protection loud.) Some of those two way military ear plugs work well enough to hear everything, yet not loose your hearing when you fire. I have never had a bear not leave the territory when that CZ went off, even though I was not shooting at the bear.

I've encountered many bears, and yes WA does have the occational Grizz...especially the Pasayten Wilderness and the Salmo Priest Wilderness. I have only seen one, and he decided he wanted to be elsewhere then near our noisey dachshund.

Coyote3855
March 16, 2012, 05:25 PM
"Bears injured less than 2 percent of people who carried or defended themselves with pepper spray during aggressive conflicts, according to two studies published in the Journal of Wildlife Management. However, research shows nearly 30 percent of those who carried or defended themselves with a gun were hurt during encounters."

http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/article.php?ctg=4

I carry a handgun of some sort, usually a .357 Speed Six. But in bear country, I always take spray.

hariph creek
March 16, 2012, 08:06 PM
Brenneke makes those Black Magic Magnums. They are best for smoothbore shotgun.

None of us will ever be attacked by a bear. It's just, so much fun to talk about.
Run a clean camp, be aware of your surroundings. Kind of like life in general. Huh?

jeepnik
March 16, 2012, 08:14 PM
Brenneke makes those Black Magic Magnums. They are best for smoothbore shotgun.

None of us will ever be attacked by a bear. It's just, so much fun to talk about.
Run a clean camp, be aware of your surroundings. Kind of like life in general. Huh?
You know, I'd bet just about every person attacked by any kind of critter believed "It will never happen to me"

As to the OP. Long guns are best. But it's unlikely you will have a long gun on your person 24/7. So, if you are truely concerned, the 870 with slugs will handle the long gun issue. But, I'd also suggest a large caliber revolver, 41 mag, 44 mag or my favorite .45 colt.

I pretty much always have a hand gun when out and about (city or country). I often take along a long gun on my outings, not because I think I might need it, but just because "I want to".

dagger dog
March 16, 2012, 08:38 PM
A clean camp is one good peice of advice.

I use the Cherokee, Nantahala , Big South Fork and surrounding National Forests for outdoor recreation.

Black bear incounters are increasing and they will eat you, they have been conditioned to see humans as a source for food, not as prey, BUT they will drag you out of your sleeping bag in the middle of the night and eat you if you SMELL like food.

If you encounter one on a trail that does not run away or that keeps advancing he is looking to eat something, and if you don't defend yourself by any means you will wind up in deep bear fecal matter!

Driftertank
March 16, 2012, 08:47 PM
Dangerous wildlife is a bit overrated out here.

FUN FACT: Did you know that the various species of deer are responsible for more fatalities each year than bears, cougars, and wolves COMBINED? That's right, you're more likely to be killed by Bambi than any of the other big scary creatures you may encounter.

Frankly, unless you're heading into territory known for a high population of Grizzly or Polar Bears, i wouldn't stress it too much. A good handgun and some spray are more than enough firepower for going walkabout almost anywhere in the lower 48.

VancMike
March 16, 2012, 08:54 PM
Reading this post, I get the feeling that every poster east of the Mississippi, plus SoCal (which isn't really the real west) is pretty sure that if one wanders around "out West" one will surely get attacked by fierce critters.

I've lived in the West (Wyo, Colo, Idaho, Ore & now in Wash) my whole life, having started hiking, riding, hunting and fishing in Wyoming's Wind River wilderness areas at age 8. In the subsequent 61 years, never, ever have I been attacked by anything with sharp teeth. Yes, I did back slowly away from a pi$$ed-off moose mama, and was talked into carrying 12-gauge pump while fishing a river full of fish and bears in AK (both bears and people stayed away from each other). I've seen cougars skulking and maybe rabid coyotes (I shot the coyotes, shouted at the cougars).

I eye mushroom pickers warily, fear meth camps and maryjane farms, and stay away from boisterous elk camps full of drunks. But my most nervous moments have been in certain neighborhoods in Chicago, NYC, LA and Detroit. I was nervous in Frisco, but for a different reason....not that there's anything wrong with that.....

My most common sidearm over the years has been a .22 revolver, now replaced by that way-cool Browning 1911-22. I'll admit to carrying a .357 or .44 Spl revolver occasionally, mostly just because I own them.

You'll be fine, son......:D

Driftertank
March 16, 2012, 09:04 PM
For the record, when i wander off into the woods, i usually carry my 1911 on me.

Why? Because most of the time, when i wander out my front door, i usually carry my 1911 on me. Seen far more of the 2-legged variety of predators, even out in the toolies, than the 4-legged variety.

joshk-k
March 16, 2012, 09:15 PM
I recently went snowshoeing for the first time in Eastern OR and carried a recently acquired Single Six with the .22Mag cylinder loaded in a chest holster. I wasn't expecting anything human or animal in the snow, but I felt like I had enough gun.

Josh

DAP90
March 16, 2012, 09:19 PM
Having carried shotguns for many miles in pursuit of pheasants and hiked for many, many more in the mountains of Colorado I would never voluntarily combine the two.

Hiking up mountains carrying a shotgun sounds like a terrible idea to me.

MoMatt
March 16, 2012, 09:25 PM
Having spent a lot of years in the Colorado backcountry, I'm going to throw in another vote for keeping a clean camp, staying aware, being loud and having some bear spray. I've never had any problem with vicious wildlife and consider myself lucky to spot anything besides a ground squirrel.

Now, for predators of the 2 legged variety, pack whatever you want!

jeepnik
March 17, 2012, 01:47 PM
Just don't miss with that one shot.

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