I fell in the river while carrying....


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quietsage
March 13, 2012, 07:40 PM
So I was fishing the Colorado river yesterday and I was trying to climb on to a large boulder that was a few steps from shore. I had hip waders on and had sloshed out and just got my first step on the moss covered stone. As soon as I put my weight on that step up..Boom..slick as oil and in went I into that wonderful 42 degree water.:cuss:

I dragged myself to shore and began the dismal process of getting the water filled waders off, wringing out soaked clothing and saying some choice words. Luckily I had brought a drybag stuffed with towels and clothing on the boat. Girlfriend brought over a towel and I spread it out, then I began the takedown on my Glock 26 that I had had IWB. It was thoroughly soaked..totally submerged. I tried to dry as much of it as possible; slide, spring, innards, magazine. I pulled all the bullets and dried those. Didn't have anything to stuff thru the barrel so I just tried to blow the water out of it. After that, I let the Glock sit and 'air out' while I changed and got myself together.

After I was sorted (about 30 or so minutes), I inspected the Glock and it seemed fine though still some water beads in the barrel but no 'solid' residue. Put it back together and racked the slide a few times, dry fired it a few times. All good. Charged it up, holstered it and put it back IWB. Went on fishing and slayed the trout and my girlfriend sure had a great laugh at my expense.

Just got back and cleaned the Glock up proper, seems all is well. The experience got me thinking though. For instance, I was wondering what would happen if I would have had to fire the pistol after I had just had it submerged? I'm not talking about shooting underwater. Have any of you fired a pistol that had just been underwater? Will water beads inside a barrel cause any type of failure? Dangerous? Just curious......

Thanks for any replies.

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Paris
March 13, 2012, 07:44 PM
Submerged for a short time? With good ammunition it will fire.

quietsage
March 13, 2012, 07:46 PM
Yes, submerged a short time.

Ragnar Danneskjold
March 13, 2012, 07:48 PM
There a plenty of rifles and pistols that were submerged off the beaches of Normandy or in the swamps of Vietnam that still fired when they needed to.

Skribs
March 13, 2012, 07:48 PM
I'm pretty sure it's extremely common for SEALs to be in this situation. Although I'm pretty sure they usually plan on it, and not sure what special equipment they use (if any).

Paris
March 13, 2012, 07:50 PM
http://youtu.be/V5Cc6A_Tnbo

I hate to link to this guy because I find his demeanor fairly lame but there it is.

quietsage
March 13, 2012, 07:54 PM
Good point Ragnar. Think that answers my question.

Cesiumsponge
March 13, 2012, 07:56 PM
It'll be fine. It's a Glock. I actually have these installed on mine http://eu.glock.com/english/options_springcups.htm

hang fire
March 13, 2012, 07:58 PM
I remember the 1982 SOF convention at the Sarah Casino in Las Vegas where some inebriated guys were firing a 1911A1 underwater in the swimming pool. Made a slight jarring sound and lots of gas bubbles as they fired a full 7 round magazine. Didn't bother the pistol at all, he was using it on the range next day.

JVaughn
March 13, 2012, 07:59 PM
Glock, no problem. granted you should dry it and clean it when you get home (especially the inside of the barrel) but it is a tool made to be used in rough situations. I would say the same about Colt, Springfield, Kimber, Ruger, etc... they should all fire after a bath.

Side note: if it doesn't you shouldn't be trusting your life with it.

Panzercat
March 13, 2012, 08:00 PM
Generally it isn't going to be the pistol bothered by the water but the ammo. Even then, a short dip probably wouldn't hurt them.

Cesiumsponge
March 13, 2012, 08:02 PM
If you're extra worried about moisture, put it in an airtight container with dessicant beads or a freshly opened pack of saltine crackers. It'll absorb any moisture you don't dab out. You can also hose it with WD40 but what a mess!

Loosedhorse
March 13, 2012, 08:03 PM
You don't seem to understand the tradition: after a tragic accident involving water, you are supposed to emerge with all your firearms lost.

Oh well: opportunity wasted! ;)

People here have said they clean their Glocks by putting them in the dishwasher, and then oiling. I'm not sure they were joking.

newbuckeye
March 13, 2012, 08:04 PM
I have a friend that lost his deer hunting in Oregon. It was turned in the next fall by another hunter with only 2 small spots of rust on the barrel and the mag spring had lost all its spring. Other than that, it was fine. A short dunk in the river will do more harm to your ego than that Glock.

InfamousLegend
March 13, 2012, 08:47 PM
Any gun I am aware of will still fire after being submerged. A gun is a mechanical device that drops a hammer through moving parts (as you already know), so unless those parts break or move the physical momentum of a spring will always force the firing pin down. You only have to worry about water getting into the bullet casing which I believe is very rare and draining water from the barrel by tilting the gun forward.

rcmodel
March 13, 2012, 09:35 PM
Your Glock got wet?
Shirley you jest?

It won't hurt it to get wet.
And a won't hurt it to fire a 9mm Glock under water if you want too.

Had you been carrying one of those obsolete Colt 1911's?
First, you would have drowned from the extra few ounces of weight.

And second, one of the rescuers who recovered your body would have had to clean the 1911 within 10 minutes with refined whale oil, or it would have been rusted beyond professional recovery & restoration, and ruined forever!

rc

Solidgun
March 13, 2012, 09:59 PM
Your Glock got wet?
Shirley you jest?

It won't hurt it to get wet.
And a won't hurt it to fire a 9mm Glock under water if you want too.

Had you been carrying one of those obsolete Colt 1911's?
First, you would have drowned from the extra few ounces of weight.

And second, one of the rescuers who recovered your body would have had to clean the 1911 within 10 minutes with refined whale oil, or it would have been rusted beyond professional recovery & restoration, and ruined forever!

rc

Only thing this post shows is pure ignorance. I am not sure why people put down one firearm platform over another.

303tom
March 13, 2012, 10:05 PM
Ah hell I bet that was a chilling experience, good to hear it all turned out fine, just towel off the Glock it will be fine.............

Sam1911
March 13, 2012, 10:07 PM
Only thing this post shows is pure ignorance. I am not sure why people put down one firearm platform over another.
Solidgun, We have to apologize for rcmodel. His deep and subtle sarcasm has just shown itself capable of tricking our newer members into missing his point. Rest assured, there are few people with as abiding an affection for the old 1911 than he has, and that the entire purpose of his point was to deliver a sidelong jab at the idea that ANY service sidearm would not have withstood this, most superficial of "torture tests."

Heck, even a SIG would have lived through that! :eek:

Lizard1911
March 13, 2012, 10:12 PM
Solid: I'm pretty sure rc's comments were fairly dripping with good natured sarcasm. I don't lurk here often, but "ignorant" is NOT used lightly here.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
March 13, 2012, 10:15 PM
Heck, even a SIG would have lived through that!

HEY!!!! :cuss: Watch it there Sambone! Dem der's fightin werds!!!! Don't be puttin down me Sig's!

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
March 13, 2012, 10:17 PM
Sam, at 1 post average per year (join date 2008 and 4 posts) I wouldn't think anyone here would take much care in his insults to our beloved RC!

dprice3844444
March 13, 2012, 10:20 PM
hell, quick shake and it's ready to go.no need to worry bout a glock

or if your in the field and have a ziplock of rice,it will draw the moisture out.save the crackers for soup.bag of rice is also good for dring out cell phones.pull the battery and card out.dropem into a ziplock bag fulla rice for 24 hours.

Owen Sparks
March 13, 2012, 10:26 PM
I dropped my 1911 in the mud on a camp out one time. The first thing I did was swish it out in the creek to wash out all the sand and debris. Then I sprayed it down with an entire can of WD 40 to displace moisture. As soon as I got home I blew it out with the air compressor and gave it a thorough cleaning. No damage at all.

FlyinBryan
March 13, 2012, 10:39 PM
put it in an airtight container with dessicant beads or a freshly opened pack of saltine crackers.
lol, ya, stick your pistol in a bag with some salty crackers!!
Solidgun, We have to apologize for rcmodel. His deep and subtle sarcasm has just shown itself capable of tricking our newer members into missing his point. Rest assured, there are few people with as abiding an affection for the old 1911 than he has, and that the entire purpose of his point was to deliver a sidelong jab at the idea that ANY service sidearm would not have withstood this,
i didnt percieve it as quite that generic, but agree, it was classic rc sarc (which i enjoyed)

Sam1911
March 13, 2012, 10:44 PM
HEY!!!! Watch it there Sambone! Dem der's fightin werds!!!! Don't be puttin down me Sig's!


Sorry!

"Even an HK would have survived that!" (Though you would still suck and they'd still hate you.)"

Better?
:D

Driftertank
March 13, 2012, 11:13 PM
I read a magazine article a few years ago where the author tried every test he could think of to kill some 1911's, including laying them on his lawn and driving over them with a truck ("Good for making 1911-shaped holes in your lawn...that's all you'll accomplish.") to submerging them in a water/talcum-powder solution, and finally shooting them completely underwater. Apparently, .45ACP hardball will still penetrate two 2x4's from 7 feet when underwater. No damage to any of the guns. Can't imagine a Glock would be any worse off.

Only thing i've been taught is, if you submerge a rifle, open the action and point the barrel down, particularly if gas operated, to allow water to drain from the barrel and action. Fairly easy for the long, skinny tube of a rifle barrel or gas tube to retain a good amount of water, which WILL cause a dangerous pressure spike if fired.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
March 13, 2012, 11:43 PM
Sorry!

"Even an HK would have survived that!" (Though you would still suck and they'd still hate you.)"

Better?

Much!! Tanky :D

FlyinBryan
March 14, 2012, 12:03 AM
Apparently, .45ACP hardball will still penetrate two 2x4's from 7 feet when underwater.

WHAT?!!!!

i terribly want to believe this, but i'm finding it difficult to even ask about.

FlyinBryan
March 14, 2012, 12:08 AM
trying to answer my own question above. its interesting, and not completely off topic by virtue of involving water.

http://www.dlsports.com/underwater_handgun_shooting.html

Brass Fetcher
March 14, 2012, 12:17 AM
Various .40S&W defensive rounds, change in velocity after MIL-STD water submergence :

http://www.brassfetcher.com/40S&W/40S&W%20Water%20Immersion%20Test.pdf

Nothing to worry about regarding lethality, unless the water in the barrel causes significant drag on the bullet.

JSpear
March 14, 2012, 01:13 AM
Thanks to all of y'all!! I've had a long day and this thread has tears in my eyes, I really needed that!! Thanks, thanks!!

Quat
March 14, 2012, 01:27 AM
Pistol ammo is generally fine underwater for quite a while. I carried a 44 mag bang stick diving a lot and just painted over the primers with a little nail polish. I swapped the rounds out every half dozen or so and never had a problem. I did rinse with fresh water every time, the salt would start to corrode the brass if I left it to its devices. I don't know that the nail polish was even necessary. I went without it a few times, and everything seemed ok but never went more than twice like that.

12 gauge shells are a different story.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
March 14, 2012, 01:30 AM
12 gauge shells are a different story.

A story that has a better conclusion if you melt a couple of drops of candle wax over the top. Seals them up all nice and pretty.

Driftertank
March 14, 2012, 01:40 AM
WHAT?!!!!

i terribly want to believe this, but i'm finding it difficult to even ask about.

I apologise for any inaccuracies resulting from my attempting to recall information from a magazine article i read years ago, but i specifically recalled mention of using a 2x4 backstop (okay, perhaps it was only 4 feet away. Hard to remember ALL the details) and he was rather surprised when his first few shots went right through it, and had to add another layer.

".45ACP....putting big holes in sturdy objects for over 100 years."

mgregg85
March 14, 2012, 01:45 AM
Just pull it out of the water and give it a good shake. Checking the bore for obstructions is never a bad idea but a tiny amount of water shouldn't hurt anything.

FlyinBryan
March 14, 2012, 01:50 AM
I apologise for any inaccuracies resulting from my attempting to recall information from a magazine article i read years ago, but i specifically recalled mention of using a 2x4 backstop (okay, perhaps it was only 4 feet away. Hard to remember ALL the details) and he was rather surprised when his first few shots went right through it, and had to add another layer.

no, no, no!! dont apoligize. ya, you were a little off, but the fact that it did penetrate wood from 4' away, underwater,,,,, close enough just from memory. im impressed as hell that it can do that!

(i carry a lightweight commander)

Driftertank
March 14, 2012, 02:15 AM
Fullsize Kimber stainless TLE II is my usual carry. I like big bullets and metal guns. But to each his/her own.

Once shot the side of a steel 55 gallon drum at the most oblique angle I could manage, just to see how much the round would deflect when passing through heavy gauge steel at a low angle. I was rather shocked when i walked up to the barrel and found myself looking straight through two holes in the steel in a straight line to a hole in the backstop, all three, best as i can tell, in a straight line to my shooting position. No visible deflection. .45 don't like to change direction....

WardenWolf
March 14, 2012, 02:17 AM
I'd take a hairdryer and blow it out nice and good, then reoil it. That's assuming the hot air can reach all parts of the action, that is. Some pistols have more hidden parts. If that's the case, it's best to do a full disassembly of those sections. For example, in a 1911, I'd remove the firing pin and possibly the firing pin block on the frame, and thoroughly dry out those channels.

jhco50
March 14, 2012, 02:56 AM
You are in Colorado. Let it air out and it will dry without rust. The ammo is probably fine and it is pretty tightly put together at the factories anymore. How ya liking this weather we're having?

mes228
March 14, 2012, 07:19 AM
No expert here. Just repeating what I've read - along with a little experience. Some use a "plug" to stopper the hole in the Glock grip. I've read that the hole is a deliberate design to drain the weapon quickly for immediate use after immersion. True or not, that's why I do not plug the hole.

I lube all my firearms with Sentry Hi-Slip Grease and RemOil. The Sentry is approved for Seals and Spec. Forces. One of the reasons is that it remains in place through salt & fresh water swims. A full synthetic, it lubes without thickening at -65 and continues to lube to about +700. Lubrication is more about personal "likes" for we non-scientist types. I like the combo for it's "storage" capabilities. You can lube a weapon, store for a year, and it will run like you lubed it ten minutes ago. Any lube will work for 99.999% of the ways the average person will use a firearm. However, I do not think all lubes work after immersion/swimming and long storage. Also with this combo lube I believe you can shoot the firearm until it melts before you have a lube failure. Just my opinion based on use.

JohnBT
March 14, 2012, 09:43 AM
"12 gauge shells are a different story."

They do just fine duck hunting in the rain, sleet and snow, but I try not to let them roll around in the bottom of the boat for hours at a time. Otherwise they work just fine. Of course the steel pellets will rust together into a clump after awhile. The old paper shells could be a problem and swell too big to chamber, but I've never had any trouble with the modern plastic ones.

Fwiw, it's not the saltwater that messes the gun up when you drop it in the bay, it's the pieces of shell and assorted grit stirred up by the prop that can clog the gun's action. Move upcurrent and swish it around in the cleaner water and all is good.

John

roadchoad
March 14, 2012, 10:33 AM
I did that once. Creek fishing in IN with a Bersa .380 in my waistband. These creeks usually were only 1-2' deep at most, with some pools of 3' or more. I was balancing on a rock,crossing a very narrow section that was usually less than a foot deep. I slipped, and fell in vertically and went completely under. this was early spring, and that water was COLD! Luckily the air was warm, so I was able to keep fishing. I shot the ammo later that day and it worked fine.

After that incident, it became pretty obvious how someone could drown in such a small creek. Had I bonked my head or gotten snagged on a piece of rebar from the old culvert pipe I wouldn't be typing this.

Gtimothy
March 14, 2012, 11:23 AM
Solidgun, We have to apologize for rcmodel. His deep and subtle sarcasm has just shown itself capable of tricking our newer members into missing his point. Rest assured, there are few people with as abiding an affection for the old 1911 than he has, and that the entire purpose of his point was to deliver a sidelong jab at the idea that ANY service sidearm would not have withstood this, most superficial of "torture tests."

Heck, even a SIG would have lived through that! :eek:
I keep my Sig in a zip loc bag with a dessi pac whenever I take it out of it's velvet lined temperature/humidity controled vault! :D Ain't never gonna get wet that way! :neener::neener::neener:

MEHavey
March 14, 2012, 11:32 AM
I'd take a hairdryer and blow it out nice and good, then reoil it.

No need to disassemble.
Spray it down inside & out with WaterDisplacement-40, then shake it out/blow it out & dry.
It's fully functional at that point, but you can also relube bearing surfaces as appropriate

Cesiumsponge
March 14, 2012, 11:35 AM
For our next torture test, lint buildup from daily carry. Can I fire my gun safely with a bore coated with lint without overpressure issues? :neener:

35Rem
March 14, 2012, 11:48 AM
Water Displacement-40

Yep. That's what it's for. I thought everyone knew that Glocks shot UNDER water. Ha Ha!

tdstout
March 14, 2012, 12:11 PM
These creeks usually were only 1-2" deep at most, with some pools of 3" or more

Doesn't (") mean inch? That's some mighty shallow water you fish in, unless I have my symbols mixed up.

ChefJeff1
March 14, 2012, 12:17 PM
I"ve sent my 38 special reload on a speed strip through the washing machine. They shot fine. I'd change out your carry ammo though, just to be sure.

Jeremiah10:23
March 14, 2012, 12:45 PM
(Though you would still suck and they'd still hate you.)

I have seen this comment several times and I am sure there is an amusing story behind it. I'd love to hear it.

kd7nqb
March 14, 2012, 12:48 PM
I had a similar experience with my M&P I decided to take the ammo and burn it up at the range and replaced it. But as to the gun I just detailed stripped it and cleaned it up.

ny32182
March 14, 2012, 01:24 PM
It is a Glock, it takes 5 minutes to detail strip; you might as well, even though there is nothing wrong with getting it wet.

Wait a minute... if you read some other threads around here, you will discover that your Glock plastic needs "rehydration" from time to time to reshape the frame, reshape the magazines, reshape the dust cover, eliminate acne...

So, maybe a yearly swim in the creek is just what the doctor ordered. Can't be too careful. :D

ObsidianOne
March 14, 2012, 01:32 PM
You know you're a gun owner when you fall into 40 degree water, climb out and the first thing you do is field strip your gun to make sure everything is okay.

Also, in regards to it firing, I suggest you take a look at this:

http://theprepared.com/content/view/90//administrator/

Pretty much won me over on Glocks and I do believe one will be purchased by myself in the near future.

roadchoad
March 14, 2012, 01:38 PM
Doesn't (") mean inch? That's some mighty shallow water you fish in, unless I have my symbols mixed up.

Heavy shift finger. I meant feet.

rcmodel
March 14, 2012, 01:45 PM
I am sure there is an amusing story behind it. I'd love to hear it.HK. Because you suck. And we hate you.
http://larrycorreia.wordpress.com/2007/10/09/hk-because-you-suck-and-we-hate-you/

rc

CountryUgly
March 14, 2012, 02:18 PM
http://youtu.be/V5Cc6A_Tnbo

I hate to link to this guy because I find his demeanor fairly lame but there it is.
Maybe if he didn't "check his surroundings" that head turning thing everytime he pulled the trigger he MIGHT not be such a dork. Mike Seeklander wasted one of his students (simunition training) for doing that very thing. The guy would shoot then turn his head back and forth like that for show but he wasn't actually scanning his enviroment just doing it so he would look cool. Seeklander "killed" him (again it was just training) to prove a point if you're gonna do that make sure you're actually seeing what's around you...lol...Sorry back on topic the glock will live...

Iramo94
March 14, 2012, 02:32 PM
HK. Because you suck. And we hate you.
http://larrycorreia.wordpress.com/2007/10/09/hk-because-you-suck-and-we-hate-you/

rc
That's the best firearms related rant I've heard in a long time. Thanks for the great laugh.

CoRoMo
March 14, 2012, 02:44 PM
Allow a good THR member here to demonstrate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om3KuZFuW_0

ol' scratch
March 14, 2012, 07:01 PM
I have never fired a pistol, but I don't see where it would be a problem. I have fired my shotguns very wet (pouring water out of the barrel) and have not had problems with them.

ol' scratch
March 14, 2012, 07:04 PM
HK. Because you suck. And we hate you.
http://larrycorreia.wordpress.com/2007/10/09/hk-because-you-suck-and-we-hate-you/

rc
I love this!

harrygunner
March 14, 2012, 08:30 PM
Smiling about 'rcmodel' being called ignorant. Images of the scene in "Shooter" where they seek the advice of a seasoned gun expert sitting in his country house flash to mind when I read some of rc's posts.

I went for a hike on a weekend of a business trip. Encountered a creek hidden in tall grass. Rather than retrace my steps, I jumped over the creek. Made it, but then the creek bank collapsed :D. I quickly leaned forward and grabbed grass to keep from slipping in. My pants and the bottom end of my Kydex holster holding a Glock 29 were in the water. After walking through the lobby of my hotel with soaked and muddy pants :o, I disassembled and dried the gun. It was good to go.

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