.45 colt recoil?


PDA






Archangel14
March 16, 2012, 06:31 PM
Hi, new to the forum....

I want some opinions as to the recoil of .45 Colt loads, particularly hotter loads. I'm considering the purchase of a Ruger Bisley (Blackhawk) 7.5 inch barrel in .45 Colt, but need to know whether the recoil is something I'll be comfortable with. I plan on using the firearm for hunting, but I also want to be able to enjoy it at the range. For some background, I recently fired a 4 inch S&W model 29 and concluded my session after about 10 rounds. I was firing cheapo Federal 240 grain ball, which I found a bit too harsh. I didn't enjoy it. I'm otherwise very comfortable with hot .357 loads out of a steel frame Ruger SP101 with Hogue grips.

Knowing that I'm somewhat .44 mag "sensitive", do you think I'll also find the hotter .45 Colt loads too much for my enjoyment? Or will I be okay with 50 rounds at the range? Keep in mind that these load will be fired exclusively from a heavy Ruger single with Bisley grip. Thanks!

If you enjoyed reading about ".45 colt recoil?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
deadin
March 16, 2012, 06:55 PM
If standard 44 Mag loads in a M29 bother you, you're not going to like hot 45 Colt loads in a Ruger Blackhawk (Bisley or regular grips)
I might suggest you find a range where you can rent a Blackhawk or borrow one from somebody and try it out before spending $$$ on one.

I had the same experience as you only with a Ruger Super Blackhawk in 44 Mag. After about 10 rounds or so I couldn't even drop the hammer on a chamber I knew was empty without flinching. I figured I was just a wimp and would have to live with it. A couple of years later I picked up a M29 and found I could go through at least a box of 50 before I started getting tired.
It was all in the grip shape. The S&W was much better. (For me, at least.)

(45 Colt in a Ruger can be loaded up to 44 Mag power, so think about it.)

Dnaltrop
March 16, 2012, 07:12 PM
I've been playing with not "Ruger only", but low .45 colt+P handloads with 200 and 250 grain hard-cast LRNFP's (I really need a chrony...)

Off the shelf 45 is fairly soft, my 225 silvertips shoot more softly than off the shelf Cowboy 250 soft lead.

if you aren't trying to crush the gun into a lump of metal with your bare hands, and you let it roll naturally upward (without letting it give you a nosejob) it's quite mild.

I'd post some pics of a good friend shooting my Blackhawk, but he was used to .38 +p's in a snubby... :D They weren't wrist breakers by any stretch, just more jump than a lifetime .38 guy is used to... (I'm saving them for when I want to embarrass him, arms held out, eyes scrunched closed, teeth gritted like a wildman)

http://www.customsixguns.com/writings/dissolving_the_myth.htm

Mr Linebaugh's writings on the .45, I found this a few weeks before buying my Ruger, and it convinced me that I didn't need to add the .44 caliber to my lineup.... Yet.

USSR
March 16, 2012, 08:58 PM
So, just how hot does a .45 Colt have to be? I have a S&W 25-5 that I obviously cannot load as hot as you can with a BlackHawk, but I kill deer cleanly with a 265gr HP load at 1050fps that is a pussycat.

Don

rcmodel
March 16, 2012, 09:46 PM
+1

A 250 cast SWC at 1,000 FPS will shoot clear through a deer.
Lengthwise.

Unless you are bothered with those pesky Tyrannosaurus Rex in your area, you don't have to shoot a .45 Colt at muzzle vertical recoil levels to kill stuff with it.

rc

Red Cent
March 16, 2012, 10:11 PM
I have the 7 .5" Super in 44 Mag. I have the 29 in 6.5". The plow handle is a lot more comfortable to shoot. Hold it decent but let her roll in your hand. 240gr cast w/gas check took a 200# feral pig at 40 yards. Clean through running broadside.
RC, I let the Ruger roll to an almost vertical:evil:.

Archangel14
March 16, 2012, 10:25 PM
Thanks gentlemen. My purpose is to hunt hogs, not trophy size, but more for meat (150-200 pounders). Maybe I don't need super powerful loads for my purpose? I'd even consider a .357, but I can't seem to find much out there with something more than a 6.5 inch barrell.

Nomad
March 16, 2012, 10:37 PM
I have shot a 45 Colt Bisley with a load that was 250 hard cast bullet at 1000+ fps it is no where near as much recoil as a 44 Mag. As someone said above, that load will go nose to tail on a deer.

CraigC
March 16, 2012, 11:47 PM
Either cartridge can be loaded to the same performance level. With similar bullet weights at similar velocities, recoil will also be similar. That said, I agree with the above that you do not need to run at blistering velocity to kill deer. My favorite .44Mag load consists of a 240gr SWC at 1050-1100fps, or 1450fps from rifles. It's all I need.

ArchAngelCD
March 17, 2012, 12:38 AM
I truly feel a 250gr bullet @ 900-1000 fps will be a much better hog load than a .357 Magnum. It's also more controllable than the Magnum load. There's no reason to push a .45 Colt load up to .44 Magnum velocities. The .45 Colt has been working quite well as designed for over 100 years. no need to change things now. The .45 Colt makes a big hole and do a good job at taking Hogs. You might want to buy a .45 Colt levergun companion for your revolver to hunt Hogs. (just a thought)

eldon519
March 17, 2012, 01:55 AM
I find the Bisley grip to be pretty comfortable, much more comfortable than a double-action though I've never specifically fired the M29. My experience is with a .45 Colt Bisley and a .45 Colt Redhawk.

If you don't reload, I might consider getting a Super Blackhawk Hunter or Bisley Hunter in .44 mag. The extra barrel weight will dampen recoil, and you can scope it for hunting (scope will also dampen recoil with its weight). You can find .44 Special and .44 magnum loads more easily that will pretty much match anything in the .45 Colt Ruger-load spectrum. There is a lot of heavy-loaded .44 Special or under-loaded .44 magnum out there that might be more comfortable for you.

Arkansas Paul
March 17, 2012, 04:51 AM
It's already been said a few times here, but the hot "Ruger Only" loads aren't needed for deer or hogs. I enjoy playing with them in my 7.5" Blackhawk though, and I'll tell you, the hotter loads are quiet stiff. I've shot 26 grains of H110 over a 250 grain bullet and I was picking flakes of rubber out of my palms from the Pachmyer grips after only one cylinder of them. That load is WAY above SAMMI specs by the way and not recommended for anything but the strongest revolvers. I do not use them for hunting, and don't shoot them much at all anymore. Pour in 8.5 grains of Unique over a 255 grain SWC and it'll do about anything you want. And it won't break your wrist either.

critter
March 17, 2012, 06:10 AM
You have already picked out the MOST comfortable gun in which to shoot the .45 Colt loads. You can also shoot very comfortable level loads for practice and fun without beating you up AND with which you can become very proficient.

Take heed, also, from those who tell you that you do NOT have to shoot 'balls to the wall' loads to take game the size of hogs and deer.

Last handgun deer I took was with a S&W model 25 in .45 Colt using hard cast SWC bullets at quite moderate velocity, perhaps 950 fps. At 50 yds, I got a complete pass through and a VERY short blood trail.

Good luck, but be warned. Handgun hunting is as addictive as crack! You've got the gun, don't overthink things, just go forth and have a blast!

The Lone Haranguer
March 17, 2012, 08:41 AM
I found my Super Blackhawk unpleasant to shoot, but the same load in a double-action S&W M29 was much better. But, 1: you don't have to load the .45 Colt to that power level; and 2: the Bisley grip reduces the "rollback" in your hand. I don't think you will have any problem with a .45 Colt at ~1000 fps.

Lucas_Y
March 17, 2012, 08:42 AM
I don't mind the recoil from "ruger only" loads. With that said, unless you plan on shooting endways through large game or just want to make a big boom, standard loads are plenty strong.

Here's video of an acquaintance of mine shooting my gun with 255 grain standard loads, followed buy some 255 grain "ruger only" loads
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/96xj4ltr5sp/th_104_4930.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v160/96xj4ltr5sp/?action=view&current=104_4930.mp4)

And a vid of me sending some 310 grainers down range
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/96xj4ltr5sp/th_104_4922.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v160/96xj4ltr5sp/?action=view&current=104_4922.mp4)

Quoheleth
March 17, 2012, 09:14 AM
This is an apples to oranges, but I shoot standard .45 Colt loads (8gr Unique under a 250 or 255gr cast lead bullet) 100 at a time with no discomfort out of my Uberti SAA clone.

The Blackhawk is beefier, so should be softer shooting with the standard stuff.

If you relegate the hot-snot loads for hunting or hunting practice, .45 Colt is a big boom and push followed by a big ol' grin. You don't get the earsplitting CRACK of magnums. It's just a fun load to make and shoot.

Q

Driftwood Johnson
March 17, 2012, 11:55 AM
Howdy

Personally I am not a fan of the Ruger version of the Bisley grip. I owned a Bisley Vaquero for a short while. I had already been shooting Cowboy Action Shooting matches for a couple of years with a couple of standard Vaqueros chambered for 45 Colt. When i decided to change over to Black Powder, everything I had read said that the bigger Bisley grip was needed to tame the recoil of full house Black Powder loads. So I bought a used Bisley Vaquero chambered for 45 Colt.

I used it exactly once.

It turns out, as some here have already stated, that I prefer the grip to roll in my hand under heavy recoil. The shape of the Bisley grip is less conducive to rolling in the hand. So it translates more of the recoil impulse straight back into the hand. The plow handle grip of a standard Vaquero or Blackhawk allows the gun to roll a bit in recoil and that eats up some of the energy of recoil.

When shooting Black Powder loads in either a Vaquero or a Colt, I do not hold the gun with a death grip. I actually hold it rather lightly, with my pinky curled under the grip. When the gun fires I allow it to recoil exactly as much as it wants, I make no effort to restrict it. The gun rolls up about 45 degrees, then my pinky stops it from rolling any further. What is left of the recoil impulse lifts my forearm up a bit. I use the elevated muzzle position to help me cock the hammer for the next shot. I can shoot full house Black Powder 45 Colt loads like this all day long and it does not hurt.

Do not confuse the grip of a S&W Model 29 with a Ruger grip. The Model 29 usually comes with oversized target grips. The shape of a modern S&W revolver tends to prevent it from rolling in the hand. The 'knuckle' (the bump at the top of the grip) is there specifically to prevent the gun from recoiling. Take a look at an original Top Break S&W Russian revolver some time, it had a huge knuckle, specifically to prevent the gun from rolling in the hand. But the 44 Russian cartridge was a very mild cartridge to shoot.

Back on topic: Large oversized target grips on a S&W offer more surface area for contact with the hand. This tends to reduce perceived recoil. I have both a S&W Model 29 and an old Flat Top Ruger Blackhawk with standard plowhandle grips, both chambered for 44 Mag. For me, the Smith is much less punishing when shooting factory 44 Mags than the Ruger. I can only shoot a dozen or so rounds from the Ruger and I am done. The large grip of the Smith makes shooting it more comfortable and I can go through an entire box with out any pain. Although with the Smith I do not curl the pinky under the grip, there is plenty of room on the oversized target grips for my entire hand.

CraigC
March 17, 2012, 12:31 PM
I truly feel a 250gr bullet @ 900-1000 fps will be a much better hog load than a .357 Magnum. It's also more controllable than the Magnum load.
Agreed, a moderately loaded big bore puts more everything on target and does so without punishing recoil and muzzle blast.


There's no reason to push a .45 Colt load up to .44 Magnum velocities.
There's no reason why you have to run the .44Mag at full steam either.


The shape of the Bisley grip is less conducive to rolling in the hand.
Recoil is highly subjective but most folks find the Ruger Bisley to be the most comfortable in handling the recoil of heavy loads. That said, the factory grips are atrocious. They're thick where they should be thin, thin where they should be thick and square where they should be round.

Loosedhorse
March 17, 2012, 01:15 PM
Knowing that I'm somewhat .44 mag "sensitive", do you think I'll also find the hotter .45 Colt loads too much for my enjoyment? Yes, I do. We like what we like, and not what we don't.

Of course recoil can be mitigated: good stocks, shooting gloves, compensator/muzzlebrake, heavy gun will all help. Will help .44 Mag, too.

Perhaps a gun chambered for .454 Casull (or even .460 S&W Mag) would be a help? As others have suggested, maybe the factory-stock Ruger Bisley isn't the best platform...

http://www.taurususa.com/images/imagesMain/454B8.jpg

:D

DocRx
March 17, 2012, 02:46 PM
What recoil? The 45Colt does "kick" a little, but not as much as a 410ga shotgun blast. I have the Taurus Judge Tracker 6.5in 45/410, and with the "Ribber" grips it mellows the recoil very well. Used both for "fun" and hunting i.e. Deer, pheasants, rabbits, etc), feels minimal to firing my Ruger KLCR 357/38. Take care and be safe.

Loosedhorse
March 17, 2012, 04:32 PM
The 45Colt does "kick" a little, but not as much as a 410ga shotgun blast.Standard .45 Colt, true. But the Ruger-only .45 Colt "+P" rounds can generate up to 2.6 lb-sec of recoil momentum. .410 out of a handgun is unlikely to get above half that.

CraigC
March 17, 2012, 04:35 PM
Perhaps a gun chambered for .454 Casull (or even .460 S&W Mag) would be a help?
More recoil is the answer???


As others have suggested, maybe the factory-stock Ruger Bisley isn't the best platform...
It's the best platform for 'most' shooters.

Eb1
March 18, 2012, 02:11 AM
I couldn't hit the barn with a SBH 5.5" .44 Magnum. Well, that is not true.

I changed the wood grips to Hogue Monogirp, and I am able to keep an average of 3" at 50 yards off-hand with my SBH with factory sights using my hand loads that average 1300 fps.
That is a 240 grain LSWC.

The recoil with factory grips was pretty taxing. Once the Hogue Monogrip was put on the SBH felt better, allowing me to get a consistent grip to control the revolver.

Carl N. Brown
March 18, 2012, 02:20 AM
I had the same experience as you only with a Ruger Super Blackhawk in 44 Mag. After about 10 rounds or so I couldn't even drop the hammer on a chamber I knew was empty without flinching.

I went three rounds with a .500 S&W before totally wimping out.

sig220mw
March 18, 2012, 02:30 AM
I have a Ruger Bisley in 45 colt with the 7 1/2 inch barrel. I use handloads that are on the bottom end of the hot loads. They are too much for a Colt SAA but just getting into the hot category. I wear PAST shooting gloves and though they do help with recoil I don't AWAYS use them. You might want to invest in some also. They may be your solution.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 07:13 AM
Perhaps a gun chambered for .454 Casull (or even .460 S&W Mag) would be a help?More recoil is the answer???
:D

Don't be obtuse, man!

A .454 or .460 revolver only delivers more recoil...if you load it with .454 or .460. Stick a .45 Colt in there, and you're fine.

Big, heavy, recoil-lessening revolvers like these:

http://www.ruger.com/products/superRedhawkStandard/images/5501.jpg

http://www.sportsmans-depot.com/product_images/m/655/SMW_170339__28230_zoom.jpg

...may not be available chambered in .45 Colt, but they are in .454 and .460. Now, if there are no more questions from the back row...;)It's the best platform for 'most' shooters. Please provide the data for your opinion. As "most" shooters haven't ever fired a Ruger Bisley (my guess), I think it's going to be difficult. But surprise me.

greenlion
March 18, 2012, 09:48 AM
Perhaps what he meant was to shoot .45 colt IN a larger gun chambered for .454. The extra weight of those bigger guns would dampen recoil quite a bit.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 11:21 AM
Don't be obtuse, man!
Obtuse, seriously??? Your solution is a big and heavy .454 or a stupidly long .460, to shoot .45Colt loads in, either of which will cost at least $800? Twice as much as the Bisley, which is the best platform anyway.


Please provide the data for your opinion. As "most" shooters haven't ever fired a Ruger Bisley (my guess), I think it's going to be difficult. But surprise me.
Your guess is wrong. 99.99% of shooters who have shot the various double and single action revolvers chambered in anything from .41Mag on up find single actions to be more comfortable than double actions and the Bisley in particular to be the most comfortable. There is a very, very good reason why 99% of the custom guns built in heavy recoiling chamberings are built on the Bisley platform. If you're unfamiliar with this, maybe you need to educate yourself?

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 12:13 PM
Obtuse, seriously??? Seriously. The OP asked about .45 Colt recoil. And I said:Perhaps a gun chambered for .454 Casull (or even .460 S&W Mag) would be a help?[Emphsis added for those who missed it the first time.] A suggestion to consider. Not (as some here say) "What you really ought to do, because I say it IS best for almost all shooters, is..." :rolleyes:

And you were objecting to the recoil of those revolvers; now that that hasn't worked out, you're switching to the price.Your guess is wrong. 99.99% of shootersRidiculous. I have shot (and still own) the Ruger Bisley Vaquero. I have shot (and still own) S&W N-frames, X-frames, Z-frame, and Ruger SRH in calibers at or above the recoil level of .45 Colt. They are all, all, better than the Bisley.

For me. Now sure, I might be as you claim, 1 out of 10,000. I'm certainly not going to be so ridiculous as to claim that my preference is best for 9999 out of 10,000.

But sheer probablity suggests you are clearly wrong, with nothing but the hat you're talking through to support you.99% of the custom guns built in heavy recoiling chamberings are built on the Bisley platformAnd please substantiate this, too. I ask for substantiation of your previous ridiculous claim, and instead get another one, even more ridiculous.

By the way, one reason that more custom Bisleys (BTW, we were NOT talking about custom Bisleys, but about factory-stock Ruger Bisleys--nice deception!) are made than one would expect is that no factory is stupid enough to offer one beyond .45 Colt. Because the market is so small. Whereas factory offerings of high-recoil guns in configurations other than Bisley are dime-a-dozen.

Perhaps you need to ask, for example, Freedom Arms to go educate themselves on the proper platform for the .454 Casull, .475 Linebaugh, and .500 WE.

Oh, man, thanks: I needed that laugh! :D;):evil::neener::p

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 12:40 PM
Hold on, I'm scratching off Hamilton Bowen, John Linebaugh, Allan Harton, Ross Seyfried, David Clements, Jim Stroh, Ben Forkin, John Gallagher, Andy Horvath, Dustin Linebaugh, John Taffin, Brian Pearce and myriad others from the list of accepted experts on heavy recoiling sixguns and placing this new internet character Loosedhorse at the top of the list. For he has now figured out what all those other hacks could not. That in reality, the Ruger Bisley is NOT the best platform for handling heavy recoil. I will now send notice to all those fine gunsmiths that they need to recall all their custom guns to replace them with Raging Bulls, and notice to all those writers and fanciers that their Bisley's need to be traded in for X-frames.

Sorry sir but it truly baffles me that someone could be so "lacking in knowledge" and yet so belligerent in defending it. Among those that "know", this is all common knowledge, among those who do not, I reckon it's a foreign concept. :rolleyes:

PS, some do prefer the FA grip design over the Bisley. Some like them equally.

Have you ever seen a 13pg thread of big bore custom guns of another style?
http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=76350

eldon519
March 18, 2012, 12:42 PM
Wow, what an a$$.

Owen Sparks
March 18, 2012, 12:52 PM
The thing I don't like about the Bisley is that it is so dang heavy.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 01:04 PM
Heavier than what? A 7˝" Bisley .44 weighs a mere 4oz more than a 6" model 29. A 4 5/8" Bisley .44 weighs 2oz less than a 6" model 29. I don't have a 5˝" Bisley but would assume it should weigh about the same as the 6" 29. The Bisley grip frame adds a mere 2oz to the overall weight of an all steel Ruger single action. The Bisley Hunter is a little heavier, 3oz more than the standard barrelled model of the same length. Lighter than all three of the DA's pictured above by our resident expert.

Now a Bisley is considerably heavier than a standard blued Blackhawk, which is a flyweight with its aluminum grip frame and ejector housing. Making it actually lighter than an equal length Colt SAA.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 01:23 PM
Hamilton Bowen, John Linebaugh, Allan Harton, Ross Seyfried, David Clements, Jim Stroh, Ben Forkin, John Gallagher, Andy Horvath, Dustin Linebaugh, John Taffin, Brian PearceNice name-dropping. I'm sure they're all friends of yours, and you have their permission to speak for them!

BTW, which one of these has said--as you have--that the Bisley is best for 99.99% of all shooters; or--as you have--that 99% of his custom high-recoil orders are Bisleys (unless of course Bisleys are his specialty, so that people would only come to him for that gun).

Which one said--as you have--that I am wrong in my guess that most shooters have probably not even fired a Ruger Bisely?

And which one said he knew what was right for me, or for the OP? No one, except you.

Just more talking through your hat. Consistency is a virtue.Ruger Bisley is NOT the best platform for handling heavy recoil. I will now send notice to all those fine gunsmiths that they need to recall all their custom guns to replace them with Raging Bulls, and notice to all those writers and fanciers that their Bisley's need to be traded in for X-frames.Ah. So, you mean you--who claim the unassailable Bisley is best knowledge--have already written to all manufacturers of all other heavy recoiling guns other than Bisleys, telling them how wrong they are?

You're beyond ridiculous now.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 01:35 PM
Why the hostility over something so trivial? I did not spit on your dog or talk about your momma.


Nice name-dropping.
Not name-dropping at all. Just a list of men who know a hell of a lot more than I do about the subject, some writers, some gunsmiths, who will all repeat what I have said.


BTW, which one of these has said--as you have--that the Bisley is best for 99.99% of all shooters; or--as you have--that 99% of his custom high-recoil orders are Bisleys...
All of them. Ask them or better yet, read Bowen's book. It would do you a lot of good.


And which one said he knew what was right for me, or for the OP? No one, except you.
I never said that and never would. I would say, as I have said here, that "most" shooters find the Bisley to be the most comfortable for handling heavy recoil. All those men I named would say the same. Some do not and there is nothing wrong with that. Recoil is a highly subjective thing and we all have our preferences. The bottom line is, whether you choose to accept it or not, that more shooters find the Bisley the most comfortable grip for handling heavy recoil.

You act as if I'm am trying to force anyone to conform to something. I am not. If you are looking for a platform in which to enjoy big bore comfort, the Bisley is a very safe choice. This based on a lifetime of experience, involving a lot of trial and error, as well as wisdom shared by others.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 01:47 PM
a list of men who know a hell of a lot more than I do about the subjectWe agree. More than me, more than most.

Which ones support your claims:

That factory-stock Ruger Bisleys are best for most shooters.
That most shooters have tried Bisleys.
That 99.99% of shooters who have tried and compared them prefer Bisleys--even though you yourself admit that "some do prefer the FA grip design over the Bisley"--I guess only 0.01%, huh?
That 99% of custom high-recoil guns built are Bisleys.

Oh--NONE of them? I guess that answers that.This based on a lifetime of experience, involving a lot of trial and error, as well as wisdom shared by others.Gosh, you're so unique! ;):D

Guess what? My opinon is also based on a lifetime of experience, and talking to lots of others...including one of the guys on your list!

Get over yourself. You've said a lot of false things here (see list above). If that is all you've gleaned from your lifetime of experience, well, that's rather sad.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 01:57 PM
Again, why the hostility???


That 99.99% of shooters who have tried and compared them prefer Bisleys....
That 99% of custom high-recoil guns built are Bisleys.

Like I said, ALL OF THEM!!!!!! Some of them won't even build custom five-shot guns on anything but a Bisley.


That most shooters have tried Bisleys.
However, I never said or even implied that.


That factory-stock Ruger Bisleys are best for most shooters.
Don't believe I said that either.


--even though you yourself prefer Freedom Arms.
Where did this come from? I've never even shot an FA. I prefer Bisleys. :rolleyes:

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 02:01 PM
If that is all you've gleaned from your lifetime of experience, well, that's rather sad.
No, what is sad is when you can't even share your life's passion with others without having to deal with petty and small minded people like yourself. People who apparently can't help but pollute an unrelated thread with drama carried over from another. Which is exactly what YOU have done ever since the "light gathering" discussion. This is the second time in as many weeks that you have created an argument from thin air, taken statements out of context and twisted them to your will. No sir, it is I who pity you. Pathetic. I'm sure the OP appreciates you derailing the thread with this petty argument.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 02:04 PM
ALL OF THEM!!!!!!Prove it. Just your hat, again.However, I never said or even implied that.You did. I said it was my guess that most shooters have never tried Bisleys; you said my guess was wrong. Take a look.Don't believe I said that either.Your attempted back-tracking is pathetic. Here's the quote:
As others have suggested, maybe the factory-stock Ruger Bisley isn't the best platform...It's the best platform for 'most' shooters.Are we done? Please?I've never even shot an FA. I prefer Bisleys.Ah, finally, I get to say this: my mistake. I have corrected that part of my post #36--take a look. Thanks.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 02:21 PM
petty and small minded people like yourselfI would have thought that "petty" describes someone who blithely writes one falsehood after another, as you do, just to put another person down. And small-minded someone who feels that what is "right" for him must be right for 99.99% of "informed" people, and anyone who thinks otherwise must be called ignorant, as you have called me.

Well, before you called me petty and small-minded, that is.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 02:27 PM
I hope everyone can see the idiocy and overt, unprovoked hostility displayed here.


Prove it. Just your hat, again.
Pick up the phone and ask them. Or you can talk directly to John Taffin on the SingleActions.com website, or Gary Reeder's message board. Since you know better than every bonified expert I can produce, I'm sure he would love to hear your rantings. Bottom line is that if you had any clue what you were talking about, I wouldn't have to prove anything.


From Bowen's book, "The Ruger firm perceived the advantages of the basic Bisley pattern and incorporated some of the improvements of the famous Keith No. 5 grip devised in the late 1920's by Harold Croft and Elmer Keith. The resulting grip frame is one of the most pleasant and comfortable imaginable, particularly for guns chambered for heavy magnum cartridges. The front strap is long enough to accommodate three typical fingers. Recoil pressure is spread over a sufficient area to be bearable, yet the grip is not so large that the average hand cannot grasp and manage it properly. The more vertical grip angle relative to the bore line tends to minimize the classic hogleg's tendency to pivot in the hand on firing. Like the original Colt Bisley grip, the Ruger version is easier to grip consistently from shot to shot. Few other grip frames are as easy to shoot precisely from the offhand position.....The Ruger Bisley model is an important contribution to the contemporary revolver community. Without it, the development of ultra big bore revolvers and cartridges probably would not have occurred."

"Without the Bisley grip, the ultra big bore boom would never have materialized. The .475 and .500 Magnum guns would be unshootable fitted with any other grip frame."


From Seyfried's article:

"What makes these revolvers so unusual, rare and wonderful is the combination of all three of these features: .44 Special, flattop target and Bisley. With these things we have a wonderful cartridge housed in an elegant target-sighted frame, with the Ruger “Bisley” grip; that to me is the most efficient and shootable revolver grip ever made."
http://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/ross-seyfried-lipseys-ruger-flattop-44-special-bisley-revolvers/


As others have suggested, maybe the factory-stock Ruger Bisley isn't the best platform...
You said "factory stock" and I said the factory grips were atrocious. If you're gonna split hairs, cut `em straight.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 02:38 PM
If you're gonna split hairs, cut `em straight.I said what I said, and you responded, quoting me. Don't claim you didn't know what I said when you called me wrong.

As to your quotes: again, pathetic. Neither person claims--as you do--that Bisleys are best for 99.99% of shooters who have tried and compared them. And only Seyfried uses the superlative of "the most efficient and shootable revolver grip ever made," specifying "to me." And Bowen? He says it is "one of the most pleasant and comfortable imaginable," clearly implying there are others.

Man, your post is so full of hot air, I wonder that it didn't fly away. And that's the best you can do to support your claims that 99.99% of folks agree with you, and that I'm ignorant, and petty, and small-minded. You spout a lotta insults, no facts. Says a lot about your lifetime of experience, doesn't it?

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 02:43 PM
This whole exchange says everything about you. There was no reason for any of this. You created an argument from thin air for no reason whatsoever, other than your obvious axe to grind. Have fun......I'll come back when you actually put forth something that proves me wrong.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 02:46 PM
You created an argumentSigh. Well, I guess it makes sense that you would end with another falsehood and another insult. As I said, you at least are consistent.

However, if you are now content to let me enjoy my N- and X-frames, my SRH--and even my Ruger Bisley!--in my ignorant bliss, well, that's great. Thanks, I guess.I hope everyone can see the idiocy and overt, unprovoked hostility displayed here.On your part, yes. I was just maintaining that your unsupportable claims were unsupportable--starting with your claim that I suggested that moving up to .460 loads would help someone who is recoil-sensitive! You bashed my short post #19 twice, for no reason. And then reeled off false claim after false claim like some shopping channel barker.

Here's an offer: you delete your false claims, and I'll delete my comments that they are false.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 03:12 PM
I'll just look forward to your posts on SingleActions.com and Gary Reeder's forum.

I see that no offer of supporting fact will be sufficient, although you counter with nothing but unsupported opinion. How does that work anyway?

So I also look forward to hearing the results of your phone call with Bowen tomorrow morning. Since you are already familiar with him, you should have no problem calling and asking him how many custom big bores he builds on Bisleys, compared to everything else. You can call and ask the same thing of John Linebaugh, Jim Stroh, David Clements, John Gallagher or any of the gunsmiths I mentioned.

Bottom line is that I have a very strong basis for my position and you have nothing.

zxcvbob
March 18, 2012, 03:29 PM
I have a 7.5" Ruger Bisley-Blackhawk in .45 Colt, and I load some real knucklebusters for it; the first couple of shots are lots of fun but the fun wears off really quickly. (I still like to shoot a few occasionally) And I bought one box of factory ammo for it, and they were loaded so weak it was embarrassing. So I load something in the middle and that's what I mostly shoot.

250 grain cast bullet, and a heavy charge of Promo powder; about 7.5 grains (that doesn't sound like a lot of powder but it is.) It delivers about 1050 fps, and I can shoot them all day long. If you load it much hotter you should switch to a slower powder, otherwise the recoil starts getting nasty all-out-of-proportion to the performance.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 03:53 PM
I'll come back when you actually put forth something that proves me wrong.Hey--you came back! So I guess I proved you wrong!I see that no offer of supporting fact will be sufficientOh, you have indeed offered the facts of Bowen's and Seyfried's writings. Only problem: those facts don't support your claims. Kinda of a bait-and-switch on your part--nice!your posts on SingleActions.comLet's see: I should walk into a forum of SA true-believers and say that SAs are not actually my preferred platform--nor most shooters' preferred platform? Why should I do that, exactly?your phone call with Bowen tomorrow morningHmmm. Did I say that I would call him, or anyone? Man, you really are desparate, aren't you? :D Pitiful, again.

Let's see: "Hi, Mr. Bowen. It's Loosedhorse. I know you're a busy man, but you see, there's this guy CraigC, and he says..."

Nah. You make the phone call. Ask him to post his response here. Make sure he includes the bit about the 99.99%.I have a very strong basis for my positionThat's spelled b-i-a-s, not b-a-s-i-s. And that's fine: you're allowed. Just don't confuse it with fact.

MichaelB
March 18, 2012, 03:59 PM
Frankly, I don't give a hoot for rantings of "experts". Just go out and shoot, enjoy good company and keep the acrimony to oneself. My enjoyment level tops out with 8 gr of Unique under a 260 gr Keith in my USFA Sheriffs Model, any more is just masochism and I'm old enough to have had my fill of same. Can't think of anything in the Pacific Northwet that can stand in front of that load. My Ruger Lipseys flattop 44 Special runs just fine with the Skeeter load too. Now, out of a Charter it's a bit of a different story.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 04:02 PM
That's about what I expected. :rolleyes:

So by your own admission, you only offer your opinion against mine. Yet cry foul that I am wrong and you are right, with zero supporting fact. I supply the names of all of those in the industry who will agree with me and you supply what, exactly? What is it exactly that you base your position on anyway? Was it something the Tooth Fairy said in his article about "light gathering"???

If John Taffin writes many times that 'most shooters find the Bisley to be the most comfortable for handling heavy recoil', I expect you to go and tell him how wrong he is because you are the new King of Sixgun knowledge and smite all who disagree. Fear not, you have the "truth" on your side. Or are you afraid of finding out how woefully wrong you are???

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 04:13 PM
light gatheringAh. Is that what this is about? You disagreed with a post of mine from months ago, and have therefore been willing to make all sorts of false statements in this unrelated thread? Nice!'most shooters find the Bisley to be the most comfortable for handling heavy recoil'If he says that (I invite your proof that he does), then, sure: he can show me his poll of ALL shooters, and the results showing that most of those polled prefer the Bisley for heavy recoil--and then it's a fact. Otherwise, it's just his opinion.

And if that's just his opinion, fine. My opinion, as I stated, is that most shooters haven't even tried the Ruger Bisley.

Perhaps you have some statistics from Ruger disputing my opinion? I mean, it would be in their interest to publicize your claimed "fact" that most shooters prefer the Ruger Bisley, right? So, I await.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 04:39 PM
Why the hell would I say that to mean "most" of ALL shooters??? Obviously most of all shooters in the US have probably never fired a single action revolver of any kind. This should be painfully obvious to all present.

"Most" shooters, who shoot big bore revolvers and have tried the available options, prefer the Bisley for handling heavy recoil. Clearly, obviously, there are exceptions. Some prefer the Super Blackhawk grip, some prefer the FA.

I'll save you the trouble but anyone can contact any of the major gunsmiths I mentioned to confirm this, the VAST majority of big bore five-shot conversions are done on the Bisley platform. Why? Because it is the most comfortable for the majority of shooters. Not Redhawks, not Super Redhawks, not Super Blackhawks, not Blackhawks. Bisleys. Anyone is free to contact any of the men I mentioned if they do not believe me.

Which is to say, this is my perception based on 25yrs of big bore revolver passion and interest. The accumulation of hundreds of books and articles. The association with hundreds of fellow big bore enthusiasts. The communication with several gunsmiths and the commission of four custom Ruger revolvers. Countless thousands of rounds handloaded and sent downrange through a plethora of sixguns of all makes, models and chamberings. I could count the number of custom DA's in .475 or .500 chamberings I've seen on both hands with change left. While those built on the Bisley number in the hundreds. I posted a link to a 13pg thread that went unnoticed.

If anyone disagrees or knows better, I humbly invite them to prove me wrong. I'm ALWAYS willing to learn something new.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 05:04 PM
Why the hell would I say that to mean "most" of ALL shootersYou're asking me why you say the things you do?"Most" shooters, who shoot big bore revolvers and have tried the available options, prefer the Bisley for handling heavy recoilActually, I believe you said 99.99%. If you are now changing to "most" (50.0001%)...hmmm, given all the N-frames, X-frames, SBHs and SRHs out there, (and fewer Freedom Arms but, as you noted, representing quite a devoted group) I still think you're probably wrong. JMHO. But I'd have to admit your claim is now in the realm of possibility.I humbly invite them to prove me wrongYour experience is your experience. I can't prove it wrong.

However, it seems tilted to SA enthusiasts and SA custom gunsmiths. It is unsurprising to me that, in those circles, you might have experienced that "most people" really like the Bisley. Great.

How you got from there to your saying the preference for Bisleys was 99.99%, and to your saying I was ignorant--well, again, how would I know why you say the things you do?

ljnowell
March 18, 2012, 05:11 PM
Hmmm. Did I say that I would call him, or anyone? Man, you really are desparate, aren't you? Pitiful, again.

Let's see: "Hi, Mr. Bowen. It's Loosedhorse. I know you're a busy man, but you see, there's this guy CraigC, and he says..."

Nah. You make the phone call. Ask him to post his response here. Make sure he includes the bit about the 99.99%.

You know, before you run your mouth on the internet you should really attempt to educate yourself. As for the people listed by craigc as being bisley proponents and building custom guns in high recoiling cartidges on the bisley platform, how about this:

http://www.sixguns.com/range/big_bore_bisleys.htm
The Bisley has become the choice of two custom gunsmiths, John Linebaugh and Hamilton Bowen , for fitting with five shot .500 cylinders and barrels. The Bisley is chosen for its inherent strength, and comfortable grip frame

Read the rest of the article. Unless you have been living under a rock, what craigc said should have been common knowledge, at least to someone who would argue about single action revolvers with such anger.


How about this one:
http://www.gunblast.com/Ruger_Bisley45.htm

The Ruger Bisley grip is much more comfortable for handling repeated firings of heavily recoiling loads in a single action revolver. The custom gunsmiths who build the powerful five shot forty-fives use the Ruger Bisley grip frame almost exclusively. The shape and length of the Ruger Bisley grip helps to keep the revolver from excessively rolling upward in the shooter’s hand upon firing. The Bisley hammer is easier to reach than that of the Blackhawk, and the trigger has a more comfortable shape.



I could post these all day, but I still doubt you would apologize for your hate filled comments and attacks in this thread.

ljnowell
March 18, 2012, 05:18 PM
If we ask Linebaugh he will tell you that when doing a 45 colt conversion:
These are done on Ruger frames only and we suggest the Bisley model for its superior grip and recoil control either in the Blackhawk model with adjustable sights or the Vaquero Bisley

When discussing the 475 linebaugh he says:
This conversion is done on new Ruger Bisley Revolvers ONLY!

and the 500 linebaugh:

The 500 is built exclusively on the Ruger Bisley and with a 7 1/2" barrel,

Here is the link to the page in question:
http://www.customsixguns.com/pricing.htm


Hmm, seems those custom makers really are stuck on the bisley, arent they?

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 05:20 PM
You know, before you run your mouth on the internetYou know, before you do the same, you should read what I wrote. I didn't say that they weren't "proponents" of the Bisley platform, nor that they dind't build Bisleys. Only that citing them did not support a 99.99% preference figure, nor even prove a "most" figure.The Bisley has become the choice of two custom gunsmiths, John Linebaugh and Hamilton Bowen , for fitting with five shot .500 cylinders and barrels.Fine. What has that to do with determining the preferences of most shooters (or 99.99% of shooters) shooting .45 caliber high-recoil loads, as in the OP?The Ruger Bisley grip is much more comfortable for handling repeated firings of heavily recoiling loads in a single action revolver.Fine. "In a single action revolver." If you'd bother reading my posts, I talked about three different DA revolvers.

So--what's you're point? I mean, besides that you like to butt in without understanding the discussion?

:DThis conversion is done on new Ruger Bisley Revolvers ONLY!Well, that's odd, because Linebaugh also says this:We will be offering both .500 and .475 caliber guns. Please call for availability of matching serial number sets.

$3,995.00 on your Ruger Super Blackhawk frame.I guess it's not just Bisleys, is it?

And gosh--why did this gunsmith (http://www.bowenclassicarms.com/catalog/ruger_double_action_big_bore_caliber_conversions.html) say:Please note: We recommend the Super Redhawk (stainless .44 model only) be used for .475 Linebaugh conversions due to heavy recoil.As far as .500 Linebaugh:

http://www.bowenclassicarms.com/image/catalog/RD07_5shot_SuperRedhawk.jpg

So: are you quoting gunsmiths selectively out of incomplete knowledge, or because you have a motive to hide some of what some actually say?

ljnowell
March 18, 2012, 05:28 PM
I understood the discusion entirely. I also understand that you are an argumentitive individual that likes to stir up a pot and create arguments on message boards. You will twist and turn at every chance to try and make sure that you dont look like you lose an argument.

You said:BTW, which one of these has said--as you have--that the Bisley is best for 99.99% of all shooters; or--as you have--that 99% of his custom high-recoil orders are Bisleys (unless of course Bisleys are his specialty, so that people would only come to him for that gun).


Proven, as posted above in those links by myself. Apologize for your foul statements or let the rest of the forum know what a tool you are for starting an argument when you are in the wrong.

If you think I will sink down to your level and engage in a stupid net war with someone who has now clue what they are talking about you are wrong. Now that there are some links up to show that you are wrong, the ball is in your court. Take the high road or look like a jerk, doesnt matter to any of us.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 05:35 PM
I also understand that you are an argumentitive individual that likes to stir up a pot No. If anyone is argumentative it is you, sticking your nose in just to argue.

What I like is to say what I believe to be true. And if someone says I'm ignorant and wrong, to ask him to prove that statement. And if he can't do that, but simply repeats what he's already said and supplies "facts" that don't support his statement...

Well, I call him on that. As I have now called you on your statements.Proven, as posted above in those links by myself. Not proven. Just the opposite, I have shown that what you posted was misleading. Your comments now suggest the attempted deception was perhaps deliberate.

Or, perhaps you just don't understand what "proven" means? Or is it the "99%" part that befuddles you?

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 06:16 PM
I have to thank ljnowell for his comments, finally some common sense in this thread.

I will also add that I know of only a couple `smith's that will even do a five shot DA. Bowen being one, Jack Huntington another. Reeder started only recently but it's a small fraction of his builds. Most don't even do them, because they're highly labor intensive and the market just prefers single actions. I wonder why???


We recommend the Super Redhawk (stainless .44 model only) be used for .475 Linebaugh conversions due to heavy recoil.
You're on the double action page so all references will be to double actions. The preference here is because the SRH is more comfortable to shoot in these custom five-shots than the standard Redhawk. The .44 model is used because the .454 and .480 models are problematic when it comes to removing the barrels.

Like I said, this should all be common knowledge to anyone who is a student of the big bore sixgun.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 07:26 PM
I know of only a couple `smith's that will even do a five shot DA.And you believe that has to do with the felt recoil, as you seem to claim, or perhaps the stronger frame of a gun without a swing-out cylinder? Or because if anyone wants a .460 or .500 DA revolver, all they have to do is pick one off the shelf from S&W for a lot less than a Linebaugh custom?

Because this thread started out about recoil.the market just prefers single actions.Oh, the "market" does? Is that why there are few factory Bisley big-bore revolvers offered, and yet so many non-Bisley SAs and plenty of DAs?Like I said, this should all be common knowledge to anyone who is a student of the big bore sixgun.Or big-bore fivegun. ;) Why do you assume it isn't? And why do you assume that this "common knowledge" helps your odd claims about the Bisley?

It doesn't.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 07:33 PM
...or perhaps the stronger frame of a gun without a swing-out cylinder?
The double actions are actually stronger, try again. Although I'm sure you'll want to refute that as well.


Oh, the "market" does?
The market for custom five-shots, yes.


And why do you assume that this "common knowledge" helps your odd claims about the Bisley?
It's only odd due to ignorance.


Or because if anyone wants a .460 or .500 DA revolver, all they have to do is pick one off the shelf from S&W for a lot less than a Linebaugh custom?
If anyone wants to buy a big, goofy X-frame over a packable single action, they are surely free to. Personally, one of my next two customs will be a five-shot .500 on the Bisley frame. Because I want a .500 chambered in a sixgun that I can actually tote on a belt holster. Not a 5lb monstrosity like the X-frame, of which I would not take a dozen free ones.

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 07:45 PM
The double actions are actually stronger, try again.Hey, I'm here to learn. If you mean by that statement that the Ruger SBH is weaker than a S&W N-frame, I'm all ears--teach me! ;):D

If you mean that the S&W X-frame is stronger than the first-gen Colt SAA...duh. Your statement has no meaning at all unless your saying WHICH SA is stronger or weaker than WHICH DA.

I would have thought that was common knowledge.It's only odd due to ignorance.Actually, it's only claimed because of that. Or something worse.PersonallyYeah, got that. But your personal preferences have nothing to do with supporting your claims about what 99.99% of "non-ignorant" shooters prefer. (Mine don't either, by the way.)The market for custom five-shots, yes.Which has nothing to do with your 99.99% claim.

CraigC
March 18, 2012, 07:51 PM
Jesus Christ, you beat all I've ever seen in my life. I should've never let this go this far because it's nothing but a stupid exercise in futility.

RUGER DOUBLE ACTIONS! Obviously. If we're talking about five-shot conversions we're OBVIOUSLY talking about Ruger double actions. The Redhawk and Super Redhawk, since I have to be so specific. I would've ASSUMED you knew that, because to sit here and have this conversation, with the almighty tone you've displayed, putting so much effort into telling the world I'm wrong I am, I should be able to ASSUME that much. Or maybe you're worse off than I thought.

I love it when somebody expends so much effort in a thread telling me I'm wrong and how stupid I am and then asks such a basic question.

theicemanmpls
March 18, 2012, 07:51 PM
Thanks gentlemen. My purpose is to hunt hogs, not trophy size, but more for meat (150-200 pounders). Maybe I don't need super powerful loads for my purpose? I'd even consider a .357, but I can't seem to find much out there with something more than a 6.5 inch barrell.
Arch,
Welcome to the forum. First of all, if you shoot at an animal, two legged, or four legged, no matter what firearm you are using, most likely you will not notice, or remember, the blast, and or the recoil.

But, we have to get you to that point. No matter what animal you are shooting at, one must make sure they provide that animal a quick clean death. IMHO, hunting is all about shot placement for many reasons.

This requires practice, and of course SAFETY.

A 357 will do the job on any hog. A 6" barrel is better then a 4". Fuhgittabout anything less then 4" I have downed whitetails at 40 yards with a 4" 357.

The recoil you feel is all about the laws of physics. Difference in the weight of the projectile, velocity launched, Issac Newton comes to town. With a .357/38 you have much more wiggle room. Bullet placement will vary with projectile weight and velocity. Also factor in grip, trigger pull, and flinch factor. A pistol that recoils hard usually attracts Mr Flinch.

I take it you know someone who reloads? You could have the Ruger 45 loaded down to Cowboy rounds for practice. Same with the 38. With the .38 you can buy wadcutter target rounds. Buy the reloader friend a bag of brass he will gladly reload what ever you want.

I have a Bisley Vaquero .45 I reload for. Very nice, classic pistol. I don't shoot it much as I prefer my 38/357 Smiths.

I have to many pistols. I need to clean out the safe to put a new seat on the Shadow. My rump is getting sore.

I think Ruger might make a Vaquero in 357. Again, nice classic firearm. In retrospect, I should of got mine in .357.

Like someone suggested, find different guns to shoot. Gun ranges are usually very friendly places. People love to show off their firearms.

What area are you from? You don't have to answer if you don't want.

rcmodel
March 18, 2012, 07:53 PM
sticking your nose in just to argue.
Jesus Christ,
Boy!
Nothing THR about this thread, after it went off the rails about two pages ago.

We all are gun guys and love them, or we wouldn't be here to argue and shout insults at each other.

Right?

Why can't we all just get along??

rc

Loosedhorse
March 18, 2012, 07:55 PM
I love it when somebody expends so much effort in a threadHey, man, takes two to tango. All I said was that a .45 Colt round would have less felt recoil through a big revolver meant for .454 or .460. And that set you off for some reason.

A whole bunch of claims by you later--most about my ignorance--here we are. I've got to conclude you were happy to supply the ride.asks such a basic question. Asking you to specify what you're talking about is a "basic question" that I shouldn't be asking?Why can't we all just get along??Hey, you're right. I'll pipe down. Let's see if anyone dives in for a last swipe at me.

theicemanmpls
March 18, 2012, 08:09 PM
Gee, here I was trying to reply to what the OP said. I bypassed all the on line drama.

Way to go guys. You really impressed the new guy. I wonder if he thinks we are junior high school boys, and went on to a forum with adults.

One of the mods will close the thread down to stop the horseplay. This was a good thread. Now dammit.

Old saying - Arguing on line is like being in the special Olympics. You may win the contest, but when its all over, you still will be developmentally disabled. (edited to be politically correct)

MCgunner
March 19, 2012, 02:42 PM
I load a 300 grain XTP over a heathy dose of 2400 for 1120 fps out of my Blackhawk's 4 5/8" barrel, 1200 fps out of my Contender's 7" barrel. It'll do anything a .44 mag will do. The Blackhawk is easy to shoot, just rolls in the hand absorbing all that recoil. the Contender kinda hurts, is not pleasant.

I've never tried a Bisley, but I do like the way the traditional plow handle rolls in my hand to eliminate the pain. I'm quite happy with a standard Blackhawk. I can say, however, that my TC is similar in profile to a DA gun and, no, I don't want a heavy recoiling DA grip shape in a hunting pistol, personal opinion and preference not based on anyone else's opinions or sales figures.

MCgunner
March 19, 2012, 02:54 PM
BTW, for range shooting, 8.3 grains Unique with a 255 flat nose Lee mold cast bullet is easy to handle in most any .45 Colt save maybe a little tougher in a snubby 5 shooter. To, this load will kill any whitetail that walks to 50 yards. All the hotter load does is extend effective range. I can shoot that load all day in my guns, though, no pain. The hot load isn't painful in the Blackhawk, but it has a rather big boom and flash to it, sorta like shooting hot .357s in a K frame. It's not tiring to ME, but hey, I'm used to it.

Super Sneaky Steve
March 19, 2012, 09:55 PM
I'm afraid of zombie bears. So I bought a box of this.

1266ft/lbs out of a revolver should do it. :D

gp911
March 20, 2012, 03:02 AM
I have fired that BB load SSS, it is STOUT. My Bisley hammer bit my hand on that one! I love the BB standard pressure 255gr @ 1000fps load, that big mutha is entertaining and all, but unless I'm in bear country...

Super Sneaky Steve
March 20, 2012, 05:53 PM
I have fired that BB load SSS, it is STOUT. My Bisley hammer bit my hand on that one! I love the BB standard pressure 255gr @ 1000fps load, that big mutha is entertaining and all, but unless I'm in bear country...

I have the standard pressure rounds too. I carry those in my New Vaquero. It's a short carry guy.

If you enjoyed reading about ".45 colt recoil?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!