Prep for new brass


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Sniper66
March 27, 2012, 05:15 PM
This issue has, no doubt, been covered before on this site, but I am new to it so I have a question. A friend of mine wants to get started reloading, so has been acquiring equipment and components. When I buy new brass, I size it and trim it, then prime it and load it. My friend, in his enthusiasm to get started just opened up the bag and primed them. How much of a problem to you think it might be for him to load them without sizing and trimming? Have you ever loaded them straight out of the bag. Should I suggest that he deprime and size them and start over? Will he have any problems reusing the primers if he does so?

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mbopp
March 27, 2012, 05:30 PM
Nope, I size, trim, then prime. I've seen too many deformed case mouths on new brass.

Dthunter
March 27, 2012, 05:31 PM
You can just size them without the primer decapping pin.
It is wise to size, trim, and size before priming and loading the cases.
This gives the case mouths a nice clean concentric neck.

When it comes down to it, your friend can just load his cases now. But he shouldnt expect top performance from his ammo.

I dont suggest depriming the brass. If you do, be very careful.
I have never had a primer detonate on me when depriming. But that doesnt mean it cant happen.

Goodluck and keep it fun!

RustyFN
March 27, 2012, 05:52 PM
It depends. If it's pistol brass then I don't trim. I always size new brass.

NeuseRvrRat
March 27, 2012, 05:53 PM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=642259

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=612209

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=591658

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=563149

etc.

USSR
March 27, 2012, 06:46 PM
No need to resize new rifle brass, since it's dimensions are actually smaller than you can size with a regular FL sizing die. My only complaint with new brass is the necks are usually too small, giving high neck tension. I usually run a mandrel or expander ball thru the necks and call it good.

Don

blarby
March 27, 2012, 07:35 PM
Given that results have been mixed lately on the dimensions of new brass.... I'd be skeptical.

Depends on a lot of factors, hard for me to make a blanket statement.

Coltdriver
March 27, 2012, 10:38 PM
Why bother to reload if you are not going to perform the first few steps that will set your reloads apart from factory ammo?

I always full length size, trim, clean up the flash hole then reload em. I usually just trim enough to get a uniform ring on the edge.

Then I measure the bullet I am going to use in the chamber its to be used from.

Enthusiasm is good, but getting the reloads right especially for a first timer is more important. I'd de-prime and do it right.

T Bran
March 27, 2012, 10:48 PM
If this is just target ammo I'd just load it and shoot it. For me the first loading is non critical as I am forming the brass to my chamber in the process. Just be sure it will chamber before you load all of them.
This is what I would do in this case normally I'd run them thru the neck sizer first but it is what it is at this point.
Keep an eye on him for a bit so he doesnt wander to far out of the box and get him to read some more if you can.
Luck T

Jdillon
March 28, 2012, 10:38 PM
With new brass, I perform the following steps;

1. Debur the flash holes
2. Uniform the primer pockets
3. Trim cases to length
4. Run an expander mandrel through the neck.
5. Turn the necks to a uniform thickness by removing a minimal amount of brass.
6. Neck size to achieve a desired tension.
7. Fire form cases.

Lots of steps but pays off in subsequent reloads.

Just my two cents.

Grumulkin
March 29, 2012, 04:29 AM
When you buy new factory ammo, ya'll need to pull the bullets and and deprime the cases. Then weigh the powder to be sure the factory got it right. Of course, since you didn't load it yourself you'll never be able to tell if the factory got the right powder but at least you'll know the weight is the same down to 0.1 grain. Make sure you deburr the flash holes and trim and resize the cases because the factory screws up these operations all the time. Once you've made sure the factory got it right, reassemble the rounds and go shoot.

FROGO207
March 29, 2012, 07:55 AM
ANY brass I get all gets the same care whether new or once fired. A complete inspection including among other things resizing and trimming to length if needed. In my many years reloading I find that a lot of new brass is not ready to reload out of the box and needs some prep first. It is cheap insurance to make sure that you have no problems. I agree that the once fired brass has at least been successfully used once without problems but I still go over it well before use. You might be able to just go for it and be OK but me, I don't want to chance it.:scrutiny:

NeuseRvrRat
March 29, 2012, 02:25 PM
When you buy new factory ammo, ya'll need to pull the bullets and and deprime the cases. Then weigh the powder to be sure the factory got it right. Of course, since you didn't load it yourself you'll never be able to tell if the factory got the right powder but at least you'll know the weight is the same down to 0.1 grain. Make sure you deburr the flash holes and trim and resize the cases because the factory screws up these operations all the time. Once you've made sure the factory got it right, reassemble the rounds and go shoot.

only time i buy factory centerfire ammo now is if i find a screaming deal on something. then i just use if for barrel break-in, foulers, or when someone asks "hey, mind if i try your rifle?".

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