When did Kimber become a bad word?


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Elkins45
March 31, 2012, 10:12 PM
I have read a lot of stuff recently on this forum and others that makes me think Kimber guns are held in less than the highest regard. When did that happen? I thought Kimber was one of the top tier "elite" 1911 makers, or at least that's what the gun rags seemed to imply.

Did something happen when I wasn't paying attention?

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scaatylobo
March 31, 2012, 10:27 PM
Some people believe that if a company makes ONE faulted gun - they are all bad.

I own 2 Kimbers and they run just fine and I will [ and do ] stake my life on either one.

To each his/her own.

I am SURE at least one hater will sound off for you.

jmr40
March 31, 2012, 10:31 PM
Kimbers are and always have been one of the top production guns. Internet chatter is a poor indicator of what to expect.

wally
March 31, 2012, 10:34 PM
They lost a lot of reputation with their ill fated external extractors. They seem to have returned production to the way JMB intended.

If buying used and its got an external extractor, I'd insist on shooting it first! I've external extractor Kimbers than work fine, but a lot of folks weren't so lucky.

Deaf Smith
March 31, 2012, 10:36 PM
The Kimber 1911s of the MK II generation, with the grip safety that acted on a firing pin block, had lots of problems. THAT is when, for a while, Kimber's reputation was hurt.

Took some times to get the bugs out of the system and some of the Kimbers did not work so well.

Deaf

Cocked & Locked
March 31, 2012, 10:53 PM
I always thought "Kimber" was a great name for a 16 year old cheerleader. :scrutiny:

I did have an early production Kimber 1911 once upon a time and it was a good pistol. I just didn't like the name...except for a cheerleader.

1858
March 31, 2012, 11:02 PM
Kimber isn't a bad word in my dictionary. In addition to the two Kimbers I have (Tactical Entry II and Stainless Pro Raptor II) I also have three Ed Browns and two Dan Wessons .... but the Kimbers aren't for sale!!

rswartsell
March 31, 2012, 11:15 PM
I have no complaints at all about my Kimber. I do believe they had some problems, luckily though mine has been exceptional. Plain black Custom Target II purchased three or four years ago with less than a box through it. It hiccuped a couple of times in the first hundred rounds, I believed the break in period advice Kimber gives and didn't go nuts trying to fix it. I am on somewhere near 3000 flawless rounds since and have grown to trust it with all kinds of ammo from ball to semi wadcutter to defense loaded +P HP.

The internet has flamed the brand out of all proportion to the problems but that is hard to see if you are the lucky winner that got a lemon. I do wonder sometimes if limp wrist or other operator controlled malfunctions don't get blamed on Kimber because of "negative momentum".

Drail
March 31, 2012, 11:17 PM
If you carefully examined a 1911 made the first year Kimber introduced it you would clearly see how much better they were compared to the last 15 years or so production quality. Every new Kimber is not defective or bad but the percentage of guns that get shipped out without being closely inspected and tested is much higher now. Kimber's philosophy now seems to be "we make 47 different models - there's one for everybody" and "keep buying them - we'll make more". I still remember the first time someone handed me a new Kimber back in the 90s. My first thought was "Bill Wilson is not going to be happy when he sees these guns". They were that good. Slide to frame - no slop. Barrel fit - no slop. Decent triggers. Very accurate shooters. I wish I would have bought 2 or 3 back then.

rswartsell
March 31, 2012, 11:25 PM
Hmmm, if you read the brief history of the company it is understandable that there have been some problems,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimber_Manufacturing

I do believe there are many fine Kimbers out there still and the history of Colt, S & W and I'm sure others are just as dramatic.

knockonit
March 31, 2012, 11:27 PM
I have to say, have owned three kimbers, two new ones and one used one, while when they shot they were accurate, but had problems with either fte, or ftf, on all three, I gave it the old three strikes and you're out, maybe sometime in the future I'll give'm a try, but with their values rising so high, it would have to be something really special. Bummer as they have very attractive units.

Feanor
April 1, 2012, 12:46 AM
I have read a lot of stuff recently on this forum and others that makes me think Kimber guns are held in less than the highest regard. When did that happen? I thought Kimber was one of the top tier "elite" 1911 makers, or at least that's what the gun rags seemed to imply.

Did something happen when I wasn't paying attention?
Kimber 1911's are not a choice of serious shooters, to many problems with the MIM parts failing, thats not to say that all MIM parts are bad, more accurately, most MIM parts aren't nearly as poorly produced as those that go into Kimber pistols. Kimber's niche was cemented when Colt's went into hiding for a decade or so, where Kimber would for the price of a Gold Cup, deliver a lot of features for the bucks spent.

Kimbers are most popular with recreational shooters, shooters who run low volumes of ammo through them. Where the problems really began was when serious shooters began to work with them, and at 1,000 - 2,000 rounds these pistols began to fail significantly, many failed long before that, with a sizable percentage spending a lot more money on them to to get em to work at all. The belief is that Kimber cuts corners, these short-cuts are likely to go by unnoticed by the recreational shooter, but not the serious 1911 guys.

Of course the Kimber fanclub will tell you otherwise, nonetheless you would best be advised to drop in on "M4carbine.net" and use the search feature, a far higher percentage of their membership is comprised of professional gunslingers and they have not been shy with sharing their experiences, and opinions about Kimber 1911's.

9mmepiphany
April 1, 2012, 01:14 AM
I thought Kimber was one of the top tier "elite" 1911 makers, or at least that's what the gun rags seemed to imply.

Did something happen when I wasn't paying attention?
Kimber hasn't been a top tier production gun since they put Colt to shame by showing that all 1911s didn't have to go to a custom smith to get the most desirable options. Kinber's two claims to fame are turning the 1911 market on it's ear with optioned out production 1911s, for the same price Colt was charging for a plain gun and their sponsorship of the USA Olympic Shooting teams (nod to Michael Bane)

Kimber's niche in the 1911 field has always been the mid-priced segment...now their bolt action rimfire rifles have always been highly rated. Kimber is the General Motors of 1911s, lots of options to dress up a basic form.

The top tier of production 1911s are the basic offerings from Brown, Wilson, Baer, and Nighthawk...along with the upper offerings from Dan Wesson, Springfield Armory and STI

shootniron
April 1, 2012, 01:23 AM
Feanor


nonetheless you would best be advised to drop in on "M4carbine.net" and use the search feature, a far higher percentage of their membership is comprised of professional gunslingers and they have not been shy with sharing their experiences, and opinions about Kimber 1911's.


What a JOKE, for advice.:rolleyes:

mingansr
April 1, 2012, 02:59 AM
a couple of weeks ago there was a thread somewhere out here that said "what is the worst gun you ever owned/shot?"

i only went thru 1000 posts and there were many more, but Kimber was the highest co. cited by respondents. much had to do with customer service, but there were other posts similar to that of some of our colleagues here. i had heard that the kimber ultra carry II required a change of spring after 1000 rounds. what the heck's that about?

mljdeckard
April 1, 2012, 03:00 AM
Elaborating on post 13,

I think there are a lot of brand snobs who felt really foolish when Kimber started selling guns with features that theretofore were only available in very expensive custom guns. There was a section of the market that chose to mock this line because they had spend (and continue to spend) a lot more on guns, and if they spent more, there must be some reason the new guns were inferior, or there was no reason for them to have spent so much on a more expensive gun.

I have shot the expensive Nighthawk's, Baer's, etc, and for the life of me, I have absolutely no idea what it is they are supposed to do for more than THREE TIMES the price of my Kimber Custom II. ($625, NIB.)

ford8nr
April 1, 2012, 03:44 AM
I own a Custom II Target and have NEVER had a feed problem in several thousand rounds. 1911's can be quirky guns especially during break in. Kimber recommends 300-500 rounds for break in if I remember right. They may have gone through a bad spell, I'd buy another today if I was looking for another. I did read the early SOLO COMP 9mm's had jam problems which have been fixed. Every brand has haters, just look up Ruger, you'd think you couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with one of their rifles. I have 3 and they all shot MOA or better, but that's a whole nother thread

Zerodefect
April 1, 2012, 04:23 AM
Kimber could be alot better if they wanted to. But they sell more guns than Harley Davidson sells motorcycles, so why change, right?

Things I didn't like about my Kimber CDP:
-billboards
-Swartz safety failed
-grip safety not sensitive enough (all 1911's have this problem lately, so no big deal)
-obsolete 3 dot sights
-frame finish a bit weak
-junk magazines
-MIM fire control parts
-many FTRTB failures
-ejects case 30 feet+ to the right
-rusty barrel
-magazine follower dug into my frame, almost destroyed my ramp
-plastic MSH. Who is the idiot that came up with that? I wouldn't have ordered a Kimber if I knew they came with plastic!

What I did like:
-appearance
-carry melt
-weight
-accuracy


How I fixed my Kimber (let's try to be constructive withour K bashing):
-Wilson sear, hammer, disco
-Kimber bump grip safety, sensitized via stone & file
-Dawson front FO sight .090 wide
-Heinie ledge rear sight .140 wide
-Tripp and Wilson mags
-polished throat of barrel
-properly polished ramp (required research, be careful)
-Ed Brown MSH
-filed frame bottom to match the EB MSH
-Wolf 18 pound recoil spring

Now all I need is a beadblast and refinish in black. Since it was my first 1911 hack job, it's too ugly to take a pic of. Hopefully I'll finish it up this year.

A $600-700 Kimber Custom or TLE is a good pistol. But a $1100+ Kimber is NOT worth the money. Better off jumping to DW, LB, EB when your willing to pay extra for something special.

So as my skills and tastes evolved, I realized I'd be better off with a more expensive brand than Kimber. Which is why I recommend DW's instead lately.

Kiln
April 1, 2012, 05:35 AM
"When did Kimber become a bad word?"

When they started charging $1200 for a gun that needs a fluff n buff out of the box.

ford8nr
April 1, 2012, 05:35 AM
I will say that several customizing rifle companies will not take Kimber rifles due to inconsistent results with accuracy. Now we're talking about reaching sub-moa.

EddieNFL
April 1, 2012, 08:05 AM
I thought Kimber was one of the top tier "elite" 1911 makers, or at least that's what the gun rags seemed to imply.

Kimber has never been a top tier "elite" 1911 maker. At one time they had an excellent reputation as a mass producer, but, as mentioned above tarnished that rep by attempting to bastardized the design. The early days of MIM didn't help either.

Getting gun info from a magazine is like depending on CNN for unbiased news coverage.

Ragnar Danneskjold
April 1, 2012, 08:09 AM
When people realized that Kimber's were 90% working out of the box. To make a truly 100% reliable and effective pistol, the user needs to put that last 10% of work into fine tuning and modding the gun.

Except people don't want to buy a gun that doesn't really work out of the box.

Buy gun
Buy ammo, any ammo
Shoot gun
It doesn't fail


If you pistol brand can't do that every time, you're failing. If you need a 5th step "mod the gun so it works properly", something is wrong.

ku4hx
April 1, 2012, 08:28 AM
I don't think it is. Admittedly, I don't own yet, but I will before long.

I've seen many guns malfunction, and help diagnose quite a few of them, during the 53 years I've been shooting. In most cases, the problem was not the gun but some other reason: gummed up action, grossly dirty bore, inappropriate ammunition, bad reloads, improper user tactics and so forth.

Some guns are lemons; I've owned one: Glock 23 I bought in 1993. Glock replaced that gun totally on their dime and since I live two hours from them I took the opportunity to show them the problems. I have no doubt Kimber would have done the same.

One apple may spoil the barrel, but always take people's assessment of how bad a product is with a grain of salt. There are many satisfied Kimber owners.

Always remember, it's just not human nature to rant about what pleases you. A few internet rants about Kimber being a bad gun in general isn't real proof of anything.

wheelgun6T9
April 1, 2012, 08:52 AM
My experience with Kimber:

Have owned a Pro Carry (not II) for many years and it has always fired flawlessly. I love the pistol and trust it fully.

Bought an Ultra Raptor II and it was a turd immediately. Working through the "break in" period, the ejector snapped in half (factory target ammo). I had Kimber replace the ejector with a stainless one and sold this pistol as soon as it was installed. I lost faith in that gun.

That's not exactly a great sample to base an opinion from but just my experience. I may get another one at some point but will be a bit anxius about it. We'll see.

stringer87
April 1, 2012, 09:05 AM
why chance it? buy something else.

the word kimber sounds pretty ghey too. that alone would keep me from buying one.

jman74
April 1, 2012, 09:10 AM
The Custom Target II I have is a great gun. The CDP, a gun costing twice as much, not so much. Two trips back to Kimber and it still would rarely get through a mag without a failure. Traded it away with full disclosure. I'll never get rid of the Target, but I'll never buy another Kimber handgun.

JohnBT
April 1, 2012, 09:45 AM
Kimber became a bad word when they started selling more 1911s than all the other makers combined. Sure they've had some problems, like their failed extractor experiment, but they sold over 75,000 1911s in 2009. A shop like Wilson made 2014 that year. Brown made 1434.

www.atf.gov/statistics/download/afmer/2009-firearms-manufacturers-export-report.pdf

"...at 1,000 - 2,000 rounds these pistols began to fail significantly, many failed long before that, with a sizable percentage spending a lot more money on them to to get em to work at all."

I guess my 1999 model is 25,000+ overdue. :rolleyes:


"I always thought "Kimber" was a great name for a 16 year old cheerleader."

Old man Warne grew up in Kimba, South Australia. It's pronounced Kimber there. Now you can stop fantasizing about young girls in short skirts.
"Kimba is a rural service town on the Eyre Highway at the top of Eyre Peninsula in South Australia."

bds
April 1, 2012, 10:45 AM
Hilton Yam often writes about LE duty weapons that must perform (http://www.10-8performance.com/pages/Choosing-a-1911-for-Duty-Use.html) with minimal failure rate. IMO, he provides straight forward objective review on most of his write ups. This is part of what he had to say about a batch of Kimber Warrior models (he didn't just review "one" pistol but a large batch - picture below shows a part of the larger batch) - http://10-8performance.blogspot.com/2010/07/kimber-warrior.html

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_BrhCi9WZCEk/TDu3aUMtZkI/AAAAAAAAABs/AOWQNCv-vso/s320/Frames3.jpg

They exhibited the following symptoms during the first training class:

-Feedway malfunctions with OEM Kimber TacPro mags - rounds would nose down into the frame below the feedramp

-Feedway malfunctions with quality aftermarket magazines. The feedramps were improperly dimensioned and all the guns came with the Kimpro finish on the feedramp so they became sticky with extended firing.

-Extractor tension failures - some of the extractors fell right out of the slides upon disassembly

-Slide stop problems - premature lockbacks, failure to lock back, or improper lockback such that seating a magazine caused the slide to drop. Most of the guns had .38/9mm slide stops with lobes so long that they struck the top round in the magazine. These guns were .45's.

-Rear sights falling out


When I got to the pistols at around 5-6000 rounds, we had some more problems:

-at least 2/3 of the pistols had loose plunger tubes that were held in primarily by the grips. The factory plunger tubes were MIM units which did not hold a stake very well.

-grip screws had come out with the bushings, as they were not staked or Loctited at the factory

-several had their barrel bushings break. These bushings were machined, and I have no idea why they went south.

Much more on link ...

Zerodefect
April 1, 2012, 11:11 AM
Deos anyone have a linky for sales figures for 2010 or 2010 for all handguns in the US. Coming up blank with Google.

Last time I saw them, Kimber makes a ton of pistols. As many as alot of the mass produced robot built Glock types.

Some 1911 companies don't advertise because they allready sell every pistol they make and don't want to expand thier operation and risk lowering thier quality. Kimber advertises everywhere with some really pretty adds. And Kimbers are spit out by machines with allmost no hand fitting at all, they're as mass produced as a Glock. Something that, aparently, isn't a good idea with an old school designed pistol from the early 1900's.

JohnBT
April 1, 2012, 12:23 PM
Of course Mr. Yam had recommended that model previously.

"Over on 10-8Forums.com, we'd had some threads which discussed issues with the Kimber Warrior, which I had once recommended as a viable service 1911. "

Things change.

Like Tim Lau said in one of their earlier discussions, "It is difficult to find a duty ready 1911 out of the box for $1200 or less"

Frank Ettin
April 1, 2012, 12:30 PM
Kimber makes a decent enough 1911. I'm just not fond of the Swartz firing pin block system.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

JohnBT
April 1, 2012, 12:30 PM
Here's the 2010 atf report.

Kimber made 80,051 .45s. Wilson made 1952 and Brown made 1876. Colt was at 27,195.

www.atf.gov/statistics/download/afmer/2010-final-firearms-manufacturing-export-report.pdf

www.atf.gov/statistics/

DammitBoy
April 1, 2012, 12:50 PM
those production numbers make the odds of buying a lemon go up pretty dramatically...

xXxplosive
April 1, 2012, 12:54 PM
Kimber = Colt Knock-Off.................IMO.

It's Not A .45 Unless It Has A Horse On It.......

coalman
April 1, 2012, 01:00 PM
I agree questions arose right around the time Kimber felt their external extractor design was a good idea. It sucked. IMO the external extractor can be an improvement to the 1911 (e.g. S&W E-Series), but Kimber's effort was terrible.

I think Kimber peaked with the Series I. I own a SI and it's better fit and finished than many SII I've owned/seen. Also, IMO, the FPB safety was a step back for the 1911 purists like me.

Regardless, most SII are good guns. But, people like to complain more than praise.

TCBPATRIOT
April 1, 2012, 02:41 PM
My wife's name is Kimber and the only problem I have with her is that sometimes she drives too slow.

EddieNFL
April 1, 2012, 02:47 PM
Some 1911 companies don't advertise because they allready sell every pistol they make and don't want to expand thier operation and risk lowering thier quality.

Exactly what happened to Kimber.

http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a338/EddieF/KimberBarrel-1.jpg

Feanor
April 1, 2012, 03:41 PM
I guess my 1999 model is 25,000+ overdue.



A singular experience, meaningless to anyone but yourself, the law of averages and Kimber 1911's, are quite familiar, one with the other. Think "Bushmaster" when comparing Kimber 1911's to other examples. There's nothing in the world wrong with being a recreational shooter, 99% plus are just that, many are highly knowledgeable firearms enthusiasts, nonetheless it's the serious shooters that quickly make, or break a pistols/rifles reputation.

The jury came in a long time ago on Kimber quality.

9mmepiphany
April 1, 2012, 03:42 PM
Kimber = Colt Knock-Off.................IMO.

It's Not A .45 Unless It Has A Horse On It.......
That was certainly Colt's attitude, when they were the only game in town, when the first thing you had to do to carry a Colt 1911 as a duty gun was take it to a gunsmith.

Colt:
1. You wants sights you can see...take it to a gunsmith to fit what you want
2. You want it to feed hollow point ammo...take it to a gunsmith, FMJ works fine
3. You want to avoid having the being eaten by sharp edges...take it to a gunsmith
4. You want a longer trigger or a flat MSH (speed bump grip safeties didn't even exist)...have one fitted by a gunsmith
5. You want a lowered ejection port to be able to easily eject loaded rounds or not dent empty casings (unless you got a Commander or Gold Cup)...why? we don't recommend reloads anyway
6. You want a larger thumb safety...why you shouldn't be loading until you're ready to shoot.

When Springfield Armory came on the market with their imported 1911s, they challenged the status que with a better value to start your build on.

When Kimber came on the market, they turned that segment on it's ear using CNC machining and casting. The Kimber Custom came standard with
1. Usable Sights
2. Polished and contoured feed ramp for JHP
3. Beavertail grip safety, lowered ejection port, extended thumb safety, skeletonized long trigger and beveled magazine well.

For 80% of the shooters, this was all they needed; for the other 20%, they would be spending a lot less having it tuned to their needs

All this for less than what Colt was selling their Government Model for.

Kimber made a usable 1911 available at an affordable price. The mid-priced range has always been their strength

mljdeckard
April 1, 2012, 04:00 PM
I really think that Colt was being quite complacent, in that they had gone so long being alone in their price point, they didn't think anyone else would ever challenge them.

Neither mine, nor the near dozen purchased by my close friends and family after they shot mine, have ever had significant problems.

There is no such thing as a gun company that is 100% reliable out of the box all of the time. I shot a Nighthawk at a rental range that jammed on me.

19-3Ben
April 1, 2012, 04:23 PM
the word kimber sounds pretty ghey too. that alone would keep me from buying one.

Is that really Kimber's problem, or is that your problem?

I can't imagine not buying an otherwise good quality gun simply because I don't like the name of the company. I feel like of all the troubles in my life, and all the things that I have to worry about, not liking the sound of the name of a company falls pretty darn low on my list.

jim goose
April 1, 2012, 05:57 PM
Ive got 2500 rounds through a 10 yr old custom II. Only one failure to feed, and that was with some premium ammo while racking it t home.

1858
April 1, 2012, 06:03 PM
-Rear sights falling out

I just got from the range and the rear sight fell out of my Dan Wesson V-Bob shooting Golden Saber 230gr JHP!! What a joke!! That has never happened to either of my Kimbers or any of my Ed Browns. I shoot my TEII in USPSA matches which is a lot tougher on the pistol than banging away on a square range. I've shot thousands of rounds through my TEII without any issues.


<edit>

Zerodefect
April 1, 2012, 06:12 PM
<edit> If you need a second opinion head on over to AR15.com

monadh
April 1, 2012, 06:12 PM
I bought an Eclipse in 2006 and it became my CCW. When i lived in Memphis I practiced with it several times a month, 200-500 rounds each time. Once it got past the break in period, it has been perfect with the exception of needing a new barrel now at 10,000+ rounds.

I speak for no one but me, and I do not present myself as an expert in much of anything. I have been shooting 1911s for 46 years, and have had 4 with the prancing pony during that time. My Eclipse is a fine weapon and I trust it completely. The USMC Pistol team came to my club to teach technique and I had the armorer look mine over. His pronouncement? Flawless manufacture with a trigger that he would like to give his guys but he can't make one that smooth.

A great pistol, flawless manufacture, excellent trigger, and a tight grouper all for roughly $1,000 back in 2006. I don't see the additional $1-$2K for a Wilson buying me much else other than a prettier pistol.

YMMV

JohnBT
April 1, 2012, 07:42 PM
"The jury came in a long time ago on Kimber quality."

Yes, the marketplace has voted and you are on the short end of the vote. All gun makers have guns sent back to have flaws fixed, even the high dollar ones. And don't get me started on Colt, Springfield, Sig and all of the other mass producers of 1911s, I've been following their ups and downs since the last century.


"A singular experience, meaningless to anyone but yourself, the law of averages and Kimber 1911's, are quite familiar, one with the other."

My singular experience, as you put it, is one fact and that's one more fact than you have contributed. A summary of your opinion isn't a fact.

Feanor
April 2, 2012, 01:31 AM
"The jury came in a long time ago on Kimber quality."

Yes, the marketplace has voted and you are on the short end of the vote. All gun makers have guns sent back to have flaws fixed, even the high dollar ones. And don't get me started on Colt, Springfield, Sig and all of the other mass producers of 1911s, I've been following their ups and downs since the last century.


"A singular experience, meaningless to anyone but yourself, the law of averages and Kimber 1911's, are quite familiar, one with the other."

My singular experience, as you put it, is one fact and that's one more fact than you have contributed. A summary of your opinion isn't a fact.
Excuse me, but you seem to be taking this all just a little to personally. I really don't have to prove a thing here, I'm just alerting the OP to the prevailing attitude toward Kimber's 1911 pistols, the "fact" is that Kimber 1911's are not well thought of by most serious 1911 shooters, thats just a fact! Any dedicated shopper can easily discover the truth of this within ten minutes of focused googling, or searching, of the various firearms forums archives. Honestly I don't understand why you guy's get so angry over this, it's as though you are personally injured or something when any firearm you have a particular fancy for, happens to be singled out for criticism.

So if you wish to rage at someone about your discomfort pertaining to these facts, why not go and find some serious, competitive, 1911 shooters and bring it up with them, how wonderful your Kimber happens to be that is. In the meantime I'm just trying to save the OP some dough, afterall he did ask!

rswartsell
April 2, 2012, 01:42 AM
I think I know what you mean Feanor, but I consider myself a "serious" shooter and I don't compete at all. The needs of competitors for competition guns will be different than my needs and priorities. That doesn't mean that I don enormous shoes and a red nose when I shoot.

It sounds like code for "someone whose opinion is more important than yours". I respect the hell out of Rob Leatham's abilities but I don't need him to do my shopping. I appreciate people sharing their experiences. I just get a little twitchy when they start assuming that I'm not in a position to appreciate my own.

Fishslayer
April 2, 2012, 01:48 AM
why chance it? buy something else.

the word kimber sounds pretty ghey too. that alone would keep me from buying one.

I've always kinda chuckled at the foofoo script on the slide. Kinda looks like it belongs on a box of feminine hygiene products.:evil:

Illogical as may be, I think some of the owners are a little offputting. They seem to be the first to chime in about certain entry level 1911s, spewing forth the wonders of their chosen piece and sagely advising... "You get what you pay for." :barf: You can almost see the sober nodding of the head. Honestly, some (not all) are as bad as glop fanboiz.

wristtwister
April 2, 2012, 01:57 AM
I'm not a big Kimber fan, because when I took my CWP class, a young man's father had bought him a brand new $1500 Kimber and it stovepiped about every third shot. The poor guy got so frustrated, I made him shoot his qualification with my old 4006 Smith... but he was turning the air blue cussing out that Kimber.

Working in a gun shop now, I see and hear just about everything about every gun... and the Kimber "legend" isn't as great as it could be. We get our share of used Kimbers in, and they're usually because of problems the shooters are having with them. The ones I've played with don't seem to have any better quality than most of the other 1911's we carry.

I'd match my Springfield stainless against most Kimbers for both looks and mechanical excellence, and the new Rugers and R1 Remingtons all run as smoothe as the Kimbers we've gotten in. Most of the Para Ordinance 1911's have pretty good characteristics and would match up as well.

I don't really dislike the guns, I just haven't found anything that makes me think they're the holy grail of 1911's which their proponents seem to think they are. We've had some Les Baer and Ed Browns come through, and they DO live up to the legends. I think I'd rather have 1 Les Baer 1911 than 5 Kimbers. They just don't trip my trigger.

WT

tarosean
April 2, 2012, 02:30 AM
Exactly what happened to Kimber.
http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a338/EddieF/KimberBarrel-1.jpg

Isnt that known as the Gangsta ramp? So it will feed easier while in the gangsta position... LOL....


Its a shame really they do make good looking guns..

ford8nr
April 2, 2012, 02:50 AM
Unfortunately the one Les Baer will cost what 2 or 3 Kimber's do. Not saying the LB isn't worth the money, I've shot them...they are! We're not comparing apples.

monadh
April 2, 2012, 08:06 AM
I'm not a big Kimber fan, because when I took my CWP class, a young man's father had bought him a brand new $1500 Kimber and it stovepiped about every third shot. The poor guy got so frustrated, I made him shoot his qualification with my old 4006 Smith... but he was turning the air blue cussing out that Kimber.

Working in a gun shop now, I see and hear just about everything about every gun... and the Kimber "legend" isn't as great as it could be. We get our share of used Kimbers in, and they're usually because of problems the shooters are having with them. The ones I've played with don't seem to have any better quality than most of the other 1911's we carry.

I'd match my Springfield stainless against most Kimbers for both looks and mechanical excellence, and the new Rugers and R1 Remingtons all run as smoothe as the Kimbers we've gotten in. Most of the Para Ordinance 1911's have pretty good characteristics and would match up as well.

I don't really dislike the guns, I just haven't found anything that makes me think they're the holy grail of 1911's which their proponents seem to think they are. We've had some Les Baer and Ed Browns come through, and they DO live up to the legends. I think I'd rather have 1 Les Baer 1911 than 5 Kimbers. They just don't trip my trigger.

WT
When I bought my Eclipse, I was aware that they do not function well right out of the box. Every friend that I know who has a Kimber has had to go through the 200-500 round break in period (to extrapolate on this, my father, who spent his career in government service overseas, never relied on a 1911 until it was well broken in. Back then that meant Colt, but I believe that can possibly apply to all 1911s regardless of manufacture). Mine was no exception. But, when that period was over, it was like someone flipped on a light. The functioning was perfect. The accuracy was as good as any pistol I had shot (still is, even after a few hundred round through Wilsons and Ed Browns). In the TN permit to carry class, shooting at distances of 3 yards out to 20 yards, slow fire, rapid fire, I scored a 100/100 with no flaws in function.

I am not surprised about the malfunctions that young man had in his "brand new $1500 Kimber", as that performance sounds par for the course to me. I would be happy to take his POS pistol off of his hands for $500, run some rounds through it, and then carry it every day.

What surprises me most about the near incessant "Kimber sucks more than anyone else" threads is how many people are expecting perfection right out of the box, and they get rid of the pistol before it is even broken in. Do Wilsons, Baers, and NIghthawks require a break in period?

kim breed
April 2, 2012, 08:30 AM
Typical company works. they started off doing great, got to many orders too quick and went into mass production without upgrading quality control. 1911's are picky guns to shoot anyways. seems like any production 45 needs tweeking before it runs and guns. This is why 1911 shooters are a picky crowd.
If I drag my glock thru the mud I just hose it off. My 1911 gets stripped and inspected. They are just a more personnel firearm.
Got a Rock Island Tactical that works flawlessly from the start. $450.00 NIB.
Springfields Trophy match shot like **** for the first 1000 rds. Now hole for hole. Why??
don't know.

Elkins45
April 2, 2012, 09:10 AM
First off, thanks to everyone who contributed.

If I may be so bold as to summarize: if a fellow happens to come across one of the earlier production guns with the internal extractor (like Browning originally spec'd and God approved) then there's a pretty good chance it's a good gun. But later production pieces have had their share of QC problems, most likely as a result of the company growing too fast.

Is that a fair assessment?

ForumSurfer
April 2, 2012, 09:31 AM
I owned a Kimber Pro CDP II. It was a great gun and I put a few thousand trouble-free rounds through it. I have zero complaints. Kimber even replaced a part I admitted to breaking, and it was out of warranty. Ok, they sent the part to me...but I don't like to send guns back...I'd rather fix it myself, so I was thrilled.

That being said, for the money I doubt I will ever own another new Kimber. There's so much other stuff in the same price range, now.

bds
April 2, 2012, 09:52 AM
There's so much other stuff in the same price range, now.
If you are looking at Kimber price range or less, I would suggest you take a look at current manufacture 5" Sig 1911s (regardless of model/finish, all the pistols are built on same frame/slide using same internal components). My railed 1911 TacPac fit/finish is very good with black Nitron finish over stainless frame/slide, match barrel/trigger and minimal MIM parts. I paid $850 for mine. It is one of more accurate 1911s I have shot in the sub $1200 range (It is shooting comparable to friend's several Kimbers - dime/quarter sized targets at 7-10-15 yards off hand).

Railed model $829 (comes with laser, holster, spare mag pouch, 2 mags) - http://www.academy.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_10051_493555_-1?N=329211139+4294961843

Non-rail model (comes with holster, spare mag pouch, 3 mags) - http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/74701

http://assets.academy.com/mgen/39/10178039.jpg?is=500,500

ForumSurfer
April 2, 2012, 09:57 AM
Those sigs are nice, I've checked them out a few times. If I buy another 1911 anytime soon, it will be an STI. I've gotten a look at a few in IDPA and they are very nice. They seem to run well, too.

Right now I'm content running SSP and I'm happy with my setup, I'm not in the market except for maybe a 9mm. STI has that covered, too.

Not sure if I got bit by the 1911 bug again or just an STI bug.

bds
April 2, 2012, 10:17 AM
I would love to get a STI Trojan but would have to go through the single shot exemption process for California. It is on my 1911 shopping list along with a railed 2011 RIA Tactical - http://centerfiresystems.com/ac-ri1911-2011-ns.aspx

http://centerfiresystems.com/images/products/thumb/ACRI19112011NSleftD.1.jpghttp://centerfiresystems.com/images/products/thumb/ACRI19112011NS6D.jpghttp://centerfiresystems.com/images/products/thumb/ACRI19112011NS8D.jpg

Jonzer77
April 2, 2012, 04:42 PM
I have owned 1 sig xo and 4 colts(70 series and three 1991) and none of them needed any sort of break in period. They all ran 100% from the start with factory ammo or my "good" reloads lol. I would have the occasional jam but that was because of a bad reload.

ForumSurfer
April 2, 2012, 04:46 PM
My Kimber's manual said it needed a break in period, but it never had trouble during that time. I could care less honestly. I'm not going to carry something I've shot less than 500 times, anyway. Even if it is the same model, just a different size...I still like to run it hard and fast for a few hundred rounds.

Zerodefect
April 2, 2012, 05:18 PM
.

What surprises me most about the near incessant "Kimber sucks more than anyone else" threads is how many people are expecting perfection right out of the box, and they get rid of the pistol before it is even broken in. Do Wilsons, Baers, and NIghthawks require a break in period?

No, Les Baers do not need a break in. But they do loosen up and shoot smoother after about 1000 rounds.

The easiest way to see if and what needs a break in: Lock the slide back and drag your finger nail down the barrel. You can feel the machined barrel finish.

Rough like Kimber and Kahr and it may take a while for the gun to smoothout and break in.

Smooth finish barrels like in finer 1911's and hammer forged barrels like Glock require no breakin.

Keb
April 2, 2012, 05:33 PM
Well if their quality did go down, then when was their last good production?

dcarch
April 2, 2012, 06:16 PM
Never had a problem with mine. Glad no one told me it was a bad name before I bought mine. :D

csa77
April 2, 2012, 06:17 PM
i dont know if the quality is down or not, I find it hard to belive they are any worse then a springfield tho . springfields are also chock full of MIM and they even glue the ejectors in place.
the whole plastic mainspring housings is a non issue, iv seen STI's SVI's and colt 1911's with plastic MSH.



I have owned a kimber since 1999 and have over 5,000 rounds thought it for sure and have only had 2 fail to extracts(both times it was a casing that got stuck in the extractor) there has never been a broken part on it.

2 out of 5,000+ hands down beats every other pistol I own or have owned.
even the "legendary" H&K USP 45

IMO i dont believe kimber is the best but they are far from the worst.

littlebluevette
April 2, 2012, 06:23 PM
Every manufacturer and gun is bashed by the competition on the Internet. That is just the way it is.

rswartsell
April 2, 2012, 06:58 PM
Production used to be in Clackamas, OR then Yonkers, NY.. most would put a premium on an Oregon production gun. The specific extractor problem has been addressed, so you alternately might want to avoid external extractors on Yonkers guns.

I believe the production site (or co. headquarters?) is roll marked on the gun. I'm looking at mine and it is stamped on the frame below the ejector port. To identify the extractor differences I'll leave it to others to tell you.

EddieNFL
April 2, 2012, 07:32 PM
The needs of competitors for competition guns will be different than my needs and priorities.

Not necessarily. The primary purpose behind IDPA is anyone can buy a handgun, take it out of the box and compete.

...a young man's father had bought him a brand new $1500 Kimber and it stovepiped about every third shot.

- It wasn't broken in, yet.
- He was limp wristing.
- Faulty ammo (probably reloads)
- Faulty magazines.

Did I miss any?

Rinspeed
April 2, 2012, 08:38 PM
Production used to be in Clackamas, OR then Yonkers, NY.. most would put a premium on an Oregon production gun.



They never produced 1911s in Clackamas, I should know because I own one. They were all made in NY but for the first year stamped Clackamas because they didn't have the FFL paperwork completed.

jfrey
April 2, 2012, 08:59 PM
They went bad for me back in 1998. Got a piece of junk and replaced it with a Springfield. Bee happy even since.

Timothy_90
April 2, 2012, 11:06 PM
I now have the Kimber 1911 that my grandfather purchased in 1996 (OK, technically it's my dad's but I've put WAY more rounds through it than him) and that gun has been flawless. It's not ever carried but that's only because it's so much heavier than my Glock 23. I shot it for my CCDW class and shot the smallest group in the class.

Dnaltrop
April 2, 2012, 11:59 PM
My bad, the 1911's were later in the productions, but anything they made after they left my State is junk, no local bias there whatsoever ;)

rswartsell
April 3, 2012, 01:12 AM
:evil:Then you are left I must assume with the Mod II vs, Mod I method of discrimination. I dont't think that the first models bore a "Mod I" in anticipation of the future so simply avoid all "II " (roman numeral 2 designations).

This is also clearly apparent on mine, but on the slide just below the ejection port.

That will eliminate at leat 1 competitor for the rest of us.:evil:

monadh
April 3, 2012, 02:39 AM
i dont know if the quality is down or not, I find it hard to belive they are any worse then a springfield tho . springfields are also chock full of MIM and they even glue the ejectors in place.
the whole plastic mainspring housings is a non issue, iv seen STI's SVI's and colt 1911's with plastic MSH.



I have owned a kimber since 1999 and have over 5,000 rounds thought it for sure and have only had 2 fail to extracts(both times it was a casing that got stuck in the extractor) there has never been a broken part on it.

2 out of 5,000+ hands down beats every other pistol I own or have owned.
even the "legendary" H&K USP 45

IMO i dont believe kimber is the best but they are far from the worst.
To be fair, my USP 45 has never missed a beat from day one. But, it has no more than 2,000 rounds through it.

Pretty accurate though.

Damon555
April 3, 2012, 03:11 AM
Thousands of flawless rounds out of my Eclipse Custom II 45 and my Stainless Target II 9mm.....my older brothers Stainless Target II 10mm.....flawless. My younger brothers Custom II w/external extractor.....flawless. My buddies Custom II.....flawless......My buddies SIS.....flawless. All full size guns. I did have a friend who bought a ultra carry II that was junk but I attribute that to the fact that it was one of the compact models. Never could get it to feed and eject reliably. I bet if you buy a full sized gun it will run perfectly.

ford8nr
April 3, 2012, 05:57 AM
Any brand compact will give you trouble if limp wrist it. I believe it was Ed Brown when asked how tight to grip a compact said "to just when the blood starts to drip ". By design they need a HARD recoil surface.

460Kodiak
April 3, 2012, 07:05 AM
For me, Kimber became a bad word due to two different moments. The first was when I emailed the company with a question about one of their products, and they ignored me completely. The second was when I was looking at a brand new $1200 1911 at a sporting goods store. I was drooling, and then I knoticed that there was rust on the muzzle of the gun. I realize that there are higher quality 1911's out there, but for $1200 I at least expect that gun to be spotless when NIB. Someone else can have my money.

JohnBT
April 3, 2012, 07:59 AM
"Did I miss any?"

Neither father or son were experienced enough to adjust the extractor. You missed that one. That was real nice of dad to buy the boy a $1500 gun.

X-Rap
April 3, 2012, 09:22 AM
Of the 1911's that I have had 2 are Kimbers and I still have them and a Springfield, the Colts and Paras are gone.
I haven't carried a 1911 for PD in 3-4 yrs and hardly even shoot them anymore.

Thaddeus Jones
April 3, 2012, 09:35 AM
Ahhh Kimber.....

The people who invented the "break in period". Overpriced, overhyped, rusting, extremely accurate, single shot 45's.

Say hello to "Dennis" in CS. If you own a Kimber you will have at least two or three conversations with that <edit>. Good luck! :)

searcher451
April 3, 2012, 10:58 AM
This thread is the first time that the OP's question has popped up on my radar. Kimber firearms in my view are no worse than many offerings available on the market and are much better than many others.

JohnBT
April 3, 2012, 11:15 AM
"If you own a Kimber you will have at least two or three conversations with that <edit>."

I've owned mine since 1999 and never spoken to him once. I guess you're wrong. Nice try, no cigar for you.

1858
April 3, 2012, 12:09 PM
Say hello to "Dennis" in CS. If you own a Kimber you will have at least two or three conversations with that <edit>. Good luck!

Uh ... no!! I have two Kimbers that I shoot regularly but I haven't had to call CS. Now if you want to talk about my two Dan Wessons bought for $1,800 and $1,900 a piece then I should probably have called CS a few times since both of those pistols had issues from the get go. I managed to get both to where they should be and then, as I said earlier, the rear sight fell off the V-Bob this past Sunday. The V-Bob is very accurate and very reliable with a bunch of different ammunition but the Heinie rear sight is a joke. Either the dovetail in the slide is oversized or the Heinie sight is undersized. There's way too much clearance between the two so a tiny screw is all that's holding the sight in place ... ridiculous!! :cuss: The rear sights on the Kimber are fitted and stay in place without a screw but the screw is there to make sure that the sight stays in place and doesn't drift under recoil.

I really don’t want to talk about this but I’m going to have to send my Ed Brown Special Forces Carry back to Ed Brown since it’s just not working right. My other two Ed Brown full-size pistols are phenomenal with no issues in a few thousand rounds but the Carry is giving me stress. That’s a $2,300 pistol by the way. So from where I sit, I have two Kimbers that don’t have any issues, and I have three considerably more expensive 1911s that either had or have issues. If I didn’t have six incredibly reliable SIGs I’d be miserable.

Certaindeaf
April 3, 2012, 12:23 PM
.the Heinie rear sight is a joke. Either the dovetail in the slide is oversized or the Heinie sight is undersized. There's way too much clearance between the two so a tiny screw is all that's holding the sight in place ... ridiculous!! :cuss: .
You can either peen the male dovetail sight a bit and drive it in or just, after you get it regulated, place one drop of green or blue loctite on the mating surfaces so that it wicks in.. wipe off the excess and let dry for a couple hours. It'll never move. Don't use red.

The-Reaver
April 3, 2012, 03:20 PM
Well for me, it became bad when a 230 grain hollow point missed my head by about 4 feet. Because this " Elite Pistol " by passed every safety that it had from a simple fall of the coffee table onto a carpet floor.

Also quality has just gotten off. I mean Sig is the same way. If you want a real quality sig you gotta get one from the late 80's early 90's.

My opinion.

Sapper771
April 3, 2012, 07:13 PM
Several years ago i was in the market for a nice 1911. Kimbers
Were plentiful in my area and I had not heard anything bad about them. I found a Kimber eclipse target II and fell in love. $1200 later, it was mine. Took it home, cleaned it, then hit the range. After the first round , my heart sank. Failure to eject. I cleared the malfunction and kept going. Failure to ejects and failure to feeds. Occasionally I got a failure to go into battery. I slugged through 100 rounds with no less than five malfunctions per magazine. I used my Wilson 47D mags with the same results.

I contacted kimber customer service and explained to them what was going on. The rep asked me if i knew how to shoot a 1911. I told him yes. He then asked me what ammo i was using. I told him. He asked a few more questions and then dropped the 500 round break in period on me and told me to call back if I was still having trouble after 500 rounds. I wasn't really happy about it, but thankfully ammo was still cheap back then.

I purchased several different brands of ammo in ball and HP configuration and started the long process of getting 500 rounds through this troubled piece. The malfunctions continued to occur with the same frequency regardless of why magazine or ammo I used.

I called kimber back and told them that I was still having issues. I had to answer the same questions again. The rep told me that it couldn't be the pistol, that it had to be me or the ammunition. I explained to the rep that I was an experienced shooter and that I had been shooting 1911's since I was 7 years old. He then asked about the ammo. I went down the list of all the ammo that I had used. The rep told me that their 1911's preferred certain ammunition and that I needed to continue trying others til I found one that worked. We went back and forth for a while til I finally had enough and requested to speak to a supervisor. Speaking with the supervisor didn't go as well as I had planned, but I finally talked him into letting me send them the pistol.....on my dollar.
So i paid nearly $60 to overnight the pistol to kimber.


I waited a few weeks and called kimber back. They transferred me to one of the gunsmiths. I asked about my 1911. The gunsmith told me that my 1911 was done and was on its way to test fire. I asked him if he knew what was wrong with my pistol and he said that he didn't know. The gunsmith acted like he didn't have time to talk to me or answer my questions so he told me to call back some other time.
This really didn't make me happy at all.

Two weeks later, I had my kimber back. Another range trip showed that it was still malfunctioning. I was getting an average of 3 malfunctions per magazine this time. Marked improvement, bit still not where it should be.

Dreading it......I called kimber and requested to speak to a gunsmith responsible for repairs. I informed the gunsmith that I was still having problems with my 1911. I asked him what kind of repairs were done on my pistol. He said he didn't know, and that it passed test fire so it should be fine. I asked several more questions to which all I got was I dont knows and the gun passed test fire. Then he transferred me back to customer service.

To shorten this up, I had to send the pistol in again. They again refused to pay for shipping. Another $60 and away it went.
IIRC, it was back in about 5 weeks. Still malfunctioning, no change.

Instead of going through customer service again, I decided to write a letter to the president of kimber. I was polite and professional in the letter, although I didn't want to be. I told him about my entire experience with the pistol , customer service , and the repairs department. I requested a refund of my money.

Three weeks later, I received a reply from the president of kimber. He apologized for all the problems and stated that it was not company policy to give refunds on firearms or shipping costs. He stated that the only advice he could give was for to continue sending the pistol to them til they got it right. I was pretty angry.

I went to the gun shop that I bought the kimber from and told them what had happened. I provided him with the letter to and from kimber. The store owner told me that he would give me $800 for the kimber, which was more than he would normally offer for it. He said he would take care of the issue with kimber. I took the offer and got a gun that worked with all the fixins. While I was waiting on my background check, I got a chance to sit down with their in house gunsmith. He said that he had several kimbers come through his shop for repairs recently, most for untuned extractors, improperly staked plunger tubes, and ill fitted grip and thumb safeties.

I wrote another letter to kimber summarizing, from start to finish, my experience. I promised them that I would speak of my experience any time I was asked about them. I am just fulfilling my promise to them.

From what I have seen, They either work or they dont. Some report no issues and some have similar experiences as mine. I will never own another kimber as long as I live due to the piss poor customer service I experienced. All firearms can have problems, but I expect a company to stand behind their products.

I do have a friend that has a series I kimber from Clackamas times and it is a really nice example of what they can produce.

Valkman
April 3, 2012, 10:26 PM
I have talked to Dennis in CS, and it was great. I have 3 Kimbers, all great guns, but the Compact CDP I bought used had dead night sights. I sent the slide in and Kimber replaced them for free. Im my experience the CS was pretty good.

jbkebert
April 3, 2012, 10:43 PM
I heard several bad words from my wife when I brought my first kimber home. Other than that never had a lick of problems. Between 2 kimbers and north of 5k rounds through them. Haven't spoken with Dennis yet. The only rust I have gotten was from a little wear on the top of barrel that is visable top of chamber. Even that is very minute.

Casefull
April 3, 2012, 11:23 PM
Despite the real and imagined problems they are the best deal going if you want an accurate 1911 without paying 2 to 4,000 for it. I have 5 of them and only the 10mm I purchased last year was not great out of the gate. It had a rough trigger which smoothed out fine after a little use. I did touch up the bottom of the ejector to get it to throw brass out the side of the port. It is now way better than any of my other 5 10mm pistols. I just got my wife a brand new 4in kimber stainless in 38 super and it shoots perfect...incredibly accurate. I compare these to a wilson combat I have and not much difference.

wyohome
April 3, 2012, 11:41 PM
Sapper771
Thanks for typing all of that. I have a Kimber Longmaster Classic rifle that also does not work. FTF and FTE, Kimber says 'send it in' (on my dime), I say eat my investment and not throw good money after bad. It is a shame, I had wanted one of these rifles for years, and to get a bad one with basically no warranty was a pretty big shock. I have heard the same horror story before...if they can't make it shoot before it is shipped, why would tinkering with it on my shipping costs make it better?

Moptop
April 3, 2012, 11:52 PM
I've owned my Royal ll for over a year now and have had NO problems with it at all. It is the most accurate 1911 I've ever shot....even better that my brothers Colt Gold Cup Nationl Match. (which I will say performs beautifully)

Now I did have to adjust the rear sight because it didn't shoot POA out of the box. but that has been the only issue I've had with it.

Kiln
April 4, 2012, 02:07 AM
Kimber requires a break in but a CZ75B or XDM can run super reliably straight out of the box. Sure the accuracy isn't the same between them but my XDM and CZ75 didn't need any breaking in before working like they should.

JohnBT
April 4, 2012, 03:27 PM
A Kimber can run super reliably straight out of the box. A great many of the 80,000+ that are sold every year do precisely that.

Speaking of the 500-round break in period, don't people plan on shooting their new gun 500 times when they first get it? I know I do. When I bought an army surplus, but like new, 40-year-old SIG P210 I ordered 3,000 rounds of good ammo just to get me started.

John

Stasher1
April 4, 2012, 06:00 PM
A Kimber can run super reliably straight out of the box. A great many of the 80,000+ that are sold every year do precisely that.

Speaking of the 500-round break in period, don't people plan on shooting their new gun 500 times when they first get it? I know I do. When I bought an army surplus, but like new, 40-year-old SIG P210 I ordered 3,000 rounds of good ammo just to get me started.

John


A great many of them are purchased, loaded, and placed in a nightstand, dresser drawer, or holster without ever being fired.

Ragnar Danneskjold
April 4, 2012, 06:40 PM
Speaking of the 500-round break in period, don't people plan on shooting their new gun 500 times when they first get it?

To me it's more of the principle of being sold a self-defence machine that doesn't work. It's 95% finished. The company is selling me a machine that I'm supposed to trust with my life, and then telling me I need to put the last bit of work in at the end to actually bring it up to standard. Not only is that wrong, but when there are other pistols available out there that will work reliably out of the box, why should I choose the one that I have to finish?

If there's a 500rd break in period, than Kimber needs to put those 500rds though the gun themselves at the factory, fix any issues that arise, then sell the gun in 100% working order.

rbernie
April 4, 2012, 08:29 PM
Heres my view on that, as I posted a couple of months ago:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=7902285&postcount=79

The War Wagon
April 4, 2012, 08:38 PM
I think for the haters, AFTER they moved from Oregon. :rolleyes:

mljdeckard
April 4, 2012, 09:35 PM
Mine didn't need a break-in.

HKGuns
April 4, 2012, 11:11 PM
In my humble opinion Kimber has always been more show than go. Slick advertising of flashy pistols that people eat up.

OcelotZ3
April 4, 2012, 11:19 PM
A friend bought one brand new. When I saw it at the range, the barrel already had rust on it... Not impressed. But I do own a Kimber Clackamas and it shoots & works fine.

distra
April 5, 2012, 07:51 PM
From my RSO experience, Kimbers are beautiful guns, but I've learned you don't bring a Kimber to a gun fight. :neener: Best place for them in the safe during such an event.

wyohome
April 5, 2012, 07:56 PM
^HAHA!^

EddieNFL
April 5, 2012, 09:23 PM
Speaking of the 500-round break in period, don't people plan on shooting their new gun 500 times when they first get it?

I fire x number of rounds to ensure reliability, not fix problems the factory should have resolved.

B J Elliott
April 18, 2012, 07:37 PM
I agree with you, but personal protection is not always on everyone's mind. It is mine, but I am sure some folks just want to go shoot for the fun of it! 10-4?

Zach S
April 18, 2012, 08:51 PM
I like their series I guns. I own four of them. I decided to experiment with one, and just shoot and lube it till it screwed up, like so many people said it would. When I broke open the sixth case of ammo, I gave up on it jamming because it was dirty. Had to bead blast it to clean it... It never failed.

IMO, the decline started with the series II safety. There were a lot of guns that went back to kimber because of it. When they got that straightened out, small parts started breaking, with mag catches and slide stops being the most common, with a few bbl bushings, hammers, and beavertails in the mix for good measure. Kimber is the reason that a lot of folks shy away from MIM parts... So, the reports of broken small parts were on the decline, and they came out with their external extractor. And a few guns went back to kimber for work, some made multiple trips, and after a while, they started swapping the slides for ones with internal extractors at their discretion.

Kimber may make a solid pistol now, but those few years turned me off of them. And after owning four series I guns, with the geniusly designed dovetails that cant be recut into anything, I was turned off of the series I guns for a while as well. Thankfully the sight manufacturers are offering more options now. I wouldnt pass up a good deal on a series I gun I could afford, but I'd look somewhere else first...

Certaindeaf
April 18, 2012, 08:58 PM
.Had to bead blast it to clean it...
Where did you learn that one?

Zach S
April 19, 2012, 07:43 AM
Where did you learn that one?
It was that dirty... I probably could have got it clean, but I got tired of hosing it down with brake cleaner and scrubbing the hell out of it.

And after I blasted it, it looked like a brand new pistol, instead of one that had been fired 5,000 times without being cleaned...

Certaindeaf
April 19, 2012, 08:36 AM
I hear you. That seems kinda odd though. Back when I was a punk kid, I'd go to an easy 2000+ often, sometimes in one day, using Red Dot and cast slugs out of a Hi-Power. Just one normal and easy session always did it for me.

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