Dry or wet, how do you run them?


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firesky101
April 3, 2012, 12:36 AM
A while back we had a thread about how well oiled a 92FS should be. I typically well oil most of my guns, and then wipe down any excess, so I did not think much of it. I recently purchased an EAA witness and the previous owner said he ran it recently. When I got it home I realized just how dry this gun was, when I oiled it seemed like any that spilled on the finish was absorbed by it. So anyways are there any guns you run dry, or should all guns be well oiled?

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talldragon
April 3, 2012, 12:49 AM
I typically well oil most of my guns, and then wipe down any excess, so I did not think much of it.

This is what I do as well. A well oiled machine......:)
But not too much ;).

Robert
April 3, 2012, 12:56 AM
Some run well wet, some run well dry. It is a matter of what your particular firearm likes. My AR likes to run dripping wet. Others may like to run dry.

BCRider
April 3, 2012, 02:49 AM
Raw metal on metal is seldom a good thing. From that I would hope that the description of " running dry" is simply a lower level of oiling and not that it's avoided.

All my guns get SOME oil. But I don't like to see them dripping the stuff.

NWCP
April 3, 2012, 03:47 AM
All of my firearms are oiled, but not excessively so. I also carry lube in my range bag as well just in case a weapon seems to need a bit during the session. Some of my rifles get lubed with gun grease. They tend to need less attention during a range day than some of my other guns. BreakFree CLP works very well for me when using an oil and Tetra Gun Grease is my other lube. My HKs tend to require less lube than my older Walthers. It will vary gun to gun, manufacturer to manufacturer.

Deus Machina
April 3, 2012, 04:01 AM
I don't own a gun that doesn't seem perfectly happy to run dry, as long as it's not dirty. Not from choice, I just got lucky.

I don't like my guns dripping, but they all seem to hold exactly as much CLP if I soak it on as if they get a light smear along the rails, so I just put a drop or two where it needs to go and rack it a dozen times.

Now if CLP didn't leak out half that drop into the serrations no matter what I do...

boomhower1820
April 3, 2012, 07:35 AM
My handgun is a glock and they take just a touch of lube on four spots. My AR is NiB coated so it runs dry. My Sig runs wet.

Sky
April 3, 2012, 07:55 AM
I run all of mine just below the splatterthrash of a white shirt. If I shoot and the oils particulate matter suspended in the mass of the gas soils my shirt, then it is to much for me, the wife, or my gun. Seems to work for me and have only ruined 2 shirts so far this year! Anyone know a sneaky way of getting Breakfree CLP out of a white shirt?

I do not run mine as wet as some (for sure) and usually I can lay a gun down and not have it seep on whatever it is resting on yet I have not experienced unusual wear or FTF with any of my pea shooters. For a hunter like myself Breakfree has always worked on anything I have owned; for me it is good enough.

hardluk1
April 3, 2012, 08:08 AM
.It can depend on the product you use. I tend to use breakfreeclp for "oil" and pro-gold for high shear areas. I owned a witness match, Little breakfree clp on the rails and a touch of pro gold on high load area and its was fine. very accurate pistol too. I lube my kahrs the same way. Nothing wet just very lightly lubed. Glocks , darn near dry.

jon_in_wv
April 3, 2012, 08:11 AM
Everything gets oiled but I normally wipe off the excess oil then the frame rails and other contact points get swiped with an oil covered q-tip before reassembly.

JustinJ
April 3, 2012, 09:28 AM
I have guns that i have no doubt will run dry but i don't. Lubrication not only improves function but also reduces wear and tear. In fact, i run all my guns extra wet at the range. For carry too much lube can be a bad thing as it attracts and holds grime.

Red Tornado
April 3, 2012, 09:34 AM
I run my Nylon 66 dry. Completely dry. ;) Everything else gets lightly oiled and the rails greased.
RT

Claude Clay
April 3, 2012, 09:48 AM
a small can of rem oil is in my range bag. and it gets used after 50 to 75 rounds in most all my guns. slide back, just a light spray under the rails and a drop on the top of the bbl.
gets offered to many others on the range if i see them having troubles...i'll ask if their guns have been oiled and offer. helps more often then not.

after a detailed clean i'll often wipe everything but the grips with Mil type lube.

Bovice
April 4, 2012, 03:03 AM
I don't bother with CLP or oil on semi-auto pistols, it flings off after 100 rounds. The gun does not "absorb" the oil, the oil is running off or evaporating. If I can't visually see lubricant, it isn't there.

ball3006
April 4, 2012, 09:38 AM
I grease slide rails and bolt parts. Oil whatever is needed. Dry metal wears out where oiled surfaces will last several lifetimes......no brainer here.....chris3

CoRoMo
April 4, 2012, 10:14 AM
I have an old Springfield .22 rifle that ONLY runs if it is stripped and scrubbed completely bare of any and all elements.

The old metal is burnished so well, it's like glass. It really is about the slickest action that I own.

After a good many rounds, it'll begin to jam up and needs to be cleaned thoroughly again.

The design isn't too forgiving of much fouling.

Lube does nothing to improve its performance.

Drail
April 4, 2012, 10:28 AM
Whether a gun will "run" wet or dry is not the issue here. Running a gun "dry" is going to accelerate wear, especially when you mix some grit from fouling in the moving/sliding parts. Use oil. As far as CLP "flinging off" after a hundred rounds, I spent years shooting competition with 1911s in very hot summer weather and after 700 to 1000 rounds in a day there was still CLP on the barrel and on the rails at the end of the day. CLP does not fling off in a hundred rounds.

gp911
April 4, 2012, 05:39 PM
Red Tornado, I see what you did there.

Mike Sr.
April 4, 2012, 06:12 PM
Heck, I thought you were talking about Suppressors......:D:D:D

Batta
April 4, 2012, 06:12 PM
Oil oil oil. For sure. I can't imagine it would ever hurt function.

Telekinesis
April 4, 2012, 06:20 PM
My guns typically follow the rule of "If it rotates, it gets oil. If it slides, it gets grease." Because the oil goes on the tighter parts, it usually goes on relatively thin, but I always try to put a good bit of grease on rails and such. My Sig really likes to have a good amount of grease on it. And I always keep a syringe or two of grease with me when I'm at the range in case I need a bit more. A gallon of the stuff runs about $10, so even using it liberally it'll take me years to run through one bucket (I'm using wheel bearing grease from an autoparts store).

I just use a syringe to put on a line of grease on each rail, put the slide on, cycle it a few times and then just wipe off the excess that got pushed out. Everything else stays on and it seems to work really well.

I absolutely hate running guns dry. And it just seems wrong when its so easy to run them lubed, if not dripping wet.

jmr40
April 4, 2012, 06:32 PM
Oil oil oil. For sure. I can't imagine it would ever hurt function.


Ask the guys in Afghanastan and Iraq. Too much oil attracts sand, dirt and grit that gums things. In many situations guns run better as dry as possible.

In extremely cold conditions oil hardens and gums up the action. Guys going into extreme cold completly strip all oil and use dry graphite for a lubricant.

The Lone Haranguer
April 4, 2012, 07:21 PM
It depends on the gun. Glocks and most other plastic-framed pistols with little frame/slide contact only need a drop of oil on contact surfaces. Pistols with more frame/slide contact, especially aluminum, need more, preferably grease.

guntech59
April 4, 2012, 09:54 PM
I disagree. Metals will absorb oil.

mnrivrat
April 4, 2012, 10:20 PM
I try to run them properly lubed. Dry is not lubed .

You don't need to swim them in oil ,but friction surfaces should be oiled or greased .

sedona
April 4, 2012, 10:46 PM
Glocks dry, sigs wet.

bushmaster1313
April 4, 2012, 10:51 PM
I am told the EBR's expect to run wet.

DesertFox
April 4, 2012, 11:36 PM
Tri-Flow, BreakFree CLP and plain ole Amsoil have treated me well. Seem to all work about the same for me. Can we add a "moist" to the mix? I guess that would be me.:)

bigfinger76
April 5, 2012, 08:40 AM
I oil my PX4 generously, but nowhere near dripping wet. I clean it often, so I see no reason to under-do it.
I also just started using a little Li grease on the slide rails. Stays put, and dirt cheap.

Drail
April 5, 2012, 10:08 AM
Ever consider the possibility that there is a good reason it's "dirt cheap"?:scrutiny:

mbt2001
April 6, 2012, 12:53 PM
Hold on... I thought you were supposed to totally immerse them in a bucket of 30weight oil... :neener:

Telekinesis
April 6, 2012, 01:51 PM
Ever consider the possibility that there is a good reason it's "dirt cheap"?

Because its marketed to automotive/industrial uses and not to gun nuts like us? If you're planning on using the grease to lubricate a tractor or a vehicle, there's no way you're even going to consider paying $5-10 for each 4oz bottle.

Overall, shooters as a group don't use much gun grease/lube. I know people who have oil bottles that are about 10-15 years old and they're still not empty! Most don't have any need for large amounts of grease/oil, so companies sell it to us in very small quantities. Throw some flashy packaging on it and put some fancy words on the bottle and you have something that people are willing to pay $5-10 a piece. As long as we're not talking about extreme operating conditions, the difference in performance of "gun only lube" and normal grease/oil is negligible.

supersappersix
April 6, 2012, 05:13 PM
I run all of mine just below the splatterthrash of a white shirt. If I shoot and the oils particulate matter suspended in the mass of the gas soils my shirt, then it is to much for me, the wife, or my gun. Seems to work for me and have only ruined 2 shirts so far this year! Anyone know a sneaky way of getting Breakfree CLP out of a white shirt?

I do not run mine as wet as some (for sure) and usually I can lay a gun down and not have it seep on whatever it is resting on yet I have not experienced unusual wear or FTF with any of my pea shooters. For a hunter like myself Breakfree has always worked on anything I have owned; for me it is good enough.
Try dawn dish detergent works on all forms of grease oil from sons McDonalds greasy grill apron to my petroleum tainted work clothes

wacki
April 6, 2012, 05:17 PM
I ran my FNP40 through a sonicator and it turned gray / silver. I thought I had ruined the gun. I then wiped it down with oil and it the finish absorbed the oil and turned black. I have a feeling that the finish of a gun is porous enough to act like an oil reservoir. So I try to make sure that reservoir is full.

The-Reaver
April 6, 2012, 05:36 PM
Greasy.

I don't run my stuff dry and I don't oil it up. A little bit of jetlube has always done the trick.

Dr.Rob
April 6, 2012, 06:05 PM
CLP.. put it on wet, even when its try it leaves a film of lube.

atomd
April 6, 2012, 06:19 PM
Now that I think about it...I have guns that use very light oil, guns that run pretty wet, others that have some grease in certain places...and others that have dry lube in certain places. I guess it all depends on the application. Everything has some type of lubrication on it somewhere.

Anyone know what kind of grease comes in those little tubes with Geissele triggers?

whalerman
April 6, 2012, 06:26 PM
Most of the knowledgeable gun guys I've listened to over the years say excess oil only attracts and holds dirt. They also say most of us overoil our guns. I probably do that too. It just feels good puttin' oil on stuff. I mean guns. It feels good puttin' oil on guns.

Captaingyro
April 6, 2012, 06:31 PM
If you're in a desert environment where lube will pick up grit, and the weapon belongs to Uncle Sam and he'll give you a new one when it wears out, run it with just enough lube to survive.

If it's your's, and you hold it dear, and you shoot on a range and come home to a civilized residence, run it wet.

Why would there even be a debate about this?

The-Reaver
April 6, 2012, 06:36 PM
Man, when I was overseas I didn't apply any oil.
Except on LMG's/HMG's The M4 stayed dry as a bone.

coalman
April 6, 2012, 06:59 PM
I run all-metal guns wet compared to the metal-plastics. Seems to work best that way. I'm not lube picky either.

holdencm9
April 6, 2012, 08:21 PM
Moist.

No, wait. That's not the right word. Damp?

Neither dry nor wet....somewhere in between. For all guns.

Sky
April 7, 2012, 11:02 AM
Try dawn dish detergent works on all forms of grease oil from sons McDonalds greasy grill apron to my petroleum tainted work clothes

Yes and thanks

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