Trapdoor Springfield - Ulberti or Pedersoli?


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Crow King
April 4, 2012, 09:45 PM
I want to get a replica .45/70 trapdoor Springfield carbine. It will be used for fun, not competition or hunting. Ulberti and Pedersoli both make one and the prices are similar. I would like to know what the differences are between them. One thing that is important to me is to have the ejector be able to cleanly expel the fired case. Any advice?

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moewadle
April 4, 2012, 10:57 PM
that Uberti owns Pedersoli now or something of the sort. Are you sure that those models are not coming off the same Italian production line someplace?

chuckles
April 5, 2012, 12:12 AM
I have a Uberti Quigley 1874 Sharps rifle that is made by Uberti and under the barrel it is engraved Pedersoli. I think they are both made on the same line. JMHO. I have a Shiloh Sharps that doesn't shoot any better than my Uberti/Pedersoli FWIW.

chez323
April 5, 2012, 11:42 AM
http://i1085.photobucket.com/albums/j426/chez323/DSC00172.jpg

I picked this one up at an auction last year, it's a great little shooter...... if you can find one. Made by Harrington & Richardson back in 70-80's I think. I've not shot either of the two brands you mentioned, though I did get to handle a Uberti that was nice looking and had a good feel to it.

Phantom Captain
April 5, 2012, 07:28 PM
Honestly,

If you look around hard enough and be patient, you can get an original for around the same price as the repros. Depends on what you want to do with it though. I had a H&R officers model carbine but I ended up trading it on an original, full length, Model 1873 dated 1884. I am way more a fan of the original and mine is an excellent shooter.

All depends though if you are going to shoot BP only or modern cartridges as I only shoot BP (handloads) and wouldn't dream of putting smokeless in the old girl. That said, I LOVE my original. Nothing like it. They are really interesting, cool, and fun old rifles. Mine is in great shape.

moewadle
April 5, 2012, 10:01 PM
about shooting the Trapdoor 45-70 by an old time shooter who was probably born about 1890 or so. Anyway, he would shoot the originals because this was before reproductions. He talked about reloading in a very simple way...he would put 70 grains of black powder in the case and simply hand push in a lead ball or slug. LOL! He told a lot of anecdotes about shooting them and told about how far they could shoot, etc. I always wanted to have the time and place to do what he did but life did not lead me that way.
I read another article, that perhaps I learned about on this forum. Back in the late 19th century I think there was some government ordnance dept. experiments with the grand old gun...The researchers went to a beach someplace on the east coast where they had lots of unfettered distance. They put up a target about the size of the side of a boxcar and got back a humongous distance(s) and were firing at that target. It was amazing what they were hitting and what distance. Get yourself an original or repro and have a lot of fun.

Old Time Hunter
April 5, 2012, 11:29 PM
about shooting the Trapdoor 45-70 by an old time shooter who was probably born about 1890 or so. Anyway, he would shoot the originals because this was before reproductions. He talked about reloading in a very simple way...he would put 70 grains of black powder in the case and simply hand push in a lead ball or slug. LOL! He told a lot of anecdotes about shooting them and told about how far they could shoot, etc. I always wanted to have the time and place to do what he did but life did not lead me that way.
I read another article, that perhaps I learned about on this forum. Back in the late 19th century I think there was some government ordnance dept. experiments with the grand old gun...The researchers went to a beach someplace on the east coast where they had lots of unfettered distance. They put up a target about the size of the side of a boxcar and got back a humongous distance(s) and were firing at that target. It was amazing what they were hitting and what distance. Get yourself an original or repro and have a lot of fun.
It was the Sandy Hook trials in the late 1870's. Believe it was a 6' target at about 2 1/2 miles or some ungodly distance.

StrawHat
April 6, 2012, 06:10 AM
A report on the Sandy Hook Trials.

http://www.researchpress.co.uk/longrange/sandyhook.htm

Also includes information about the Gov't testing of the 45-80.

Another book that is valuable to the Trapdoor shooter is by Spencer Wolf. He researched the origianl laodings and was responsible for Lee producing the 405 grain hollow based bullet mold that duplicates the original Armory bullet. Lots of info about replicating the original load. Some of the info has been rejected by current shooters but it is still a good read.

http://www.4570book.info/

For similar money you can still find origianl Springfield Single Shot Rifles. I have an 1873 that is recently acquired and an 1866 that I rebuilt. Both are good solid shooters and a lot of fun to use.

loose noose
April 7, 2012, 12:04 PM
I've got an original Springfield Trapdoor, and a Pedersoli, both were bought for under $800.00 each about 10 years ago, and both shoot some respectable groups using mil spec 45-70 ammo. I've got the book for reloading that Straw Hat mentioned, cause before I got that book and started loading in according to it I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with either of them. That is the one by Spencer Wolf's, since re-written by his wife or daughter.

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