Troubleshooting a computer, with a shotgun


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Mike1957
April 7, 2012, 12:47 AM
Had an old computer that was having fits. So I did a little computer troubleshooting on it, with an 870 Wingmaster and a MAK-90.
Got a new video camera a while back, so I got it all on video along with some still pictures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFODHkdFlks




http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1827.jpg

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1828.jpg

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1829.jpg

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1831.jpg

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1832.jpg

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a413/Shep1957/Guns%202/100_1833.jpg

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R.W.Dale
April 7, 2012, 12:51 AM
I can see it now. Our first "what caliber for I.T. troubleshooting" thread


I find appliances to be a much more engaging quarry myself.

posted via mobile device.

Mike1957
April 7, 2012, 12:59 AM
I can see it now. Our first "what caliber for I.T. troubleshooting" thread


I find appliances to be a much more engaging quarry myself.

posted via mobile device.
I thought about using the .458 on it, but I didn`t think my shoulder would stand 100 rounds of it.:)

Twiki357
April 7, 2012, 01:20 AM
I hope you hauled the debris away. Here in AZ there's a growing amount of flak about open shooting areas because of all the target trash that people leave behind. Other than that..... Fun Fun Fun

moewadle
April 7, 2012, 01:31 AM
Hope you did thorough clean-up.

Mike1957
April 7, 2012, 01:31 AM
I hope you hauled the debris away. Here in AZ there's a growing amount of flak about open shooting areas because of all the target trash that people leave behind. Other than that..... Fun Fun Fun
The computer carcass is in the back of the truck right now.
Might put it next to the lawn mower just to remind it what could happen the next time it throws a fit.:)

WardenWolf
April 7, 2012, 04:37 AM
I had this line in my sig for a long time: "You first need to install Tannerite in your computer, and then we can troubleshoot it."

MyGreenGuns
April 7, 2012, 04:43 AM
Did it fix the problem? :rolleyes:

Its great fun to shoot stuff like this, I just dont like picking up all the pieces.

Wildbillz
April 7, 2012, 07:55 AM
I used a 44 Mag to fragment a hard drive one time...

WB

The Lone Haranguer
April 7, 2012, 08:23 AM
I've felt like doing it more than once. :D

The things are surprisingly tough. Note how - aside from the holes, of course - it is still relatively intact. It reminds me of the thread a few months ago about flat-panel monitors actually stopping bullets.

Salmoneye
April 7, 2012, 08:25 AM
I don't suppose vacuuming the dust bunnies out would have helped, eh?

rellascout
April 7, 2012, 10:58 AM
Sorry but shooting things like computers. TVs and other electronics is not a good practice. Almost all electronics contain heavy metals which are harmful to the environment and can poison drinking water....


Many electronic items contain components that can cause environmental damage when thrown in the landfill. Circuit boards contain metals like cadmium, antimony, and lead. Mercury is present in switches and lamps of many photocopiers, scanners, and fax machines. Large amounts of lead can also be found in monitors and TV glass. Plastic computer casings can have brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, materials that can release toxic chemicals when incinerated. The ever-increasing amount of obsolete electronic equipment poses a real problem for solid waste management.


Unless you managed to pick up every single scrap of material left from your computer after you shot it full of holes you more than likely left some toxic material.... :(

R.W.Dale
April 7, 2012, 01:09 PM
Sorry but shooting things like computers. TVs and other electronics is not a good practice. Almost all electronics contain heavy metals which are harmful to the environment and can poison drinking water....




Unless you managed to pick up every single scrap of material left from your computer after you shot it full of holes you more than likely left some toxic material.... :(

Heavy metals.. . You mean like lead and stuff :rolleyes:

posted via mobile device.

moewadle
April 7, 2012, 01:11 PM
for posting that. I really hate to see appliances shot up and even fragments left around to pollute the soil and environment.

fallout mike
April 7, 2012, 01:15 PM
Where do these heavy metals that they use come from?

blarby
April 7, 2012, 01:16 PM
Meh, shoot what ya want....but pick up all the pieces.

Still a waste of a computer.

Since you aren't using THAT registered copy anymore, please feel free to PM me your windows license key.... I can give it to someone who needs it.

Rail Driver
April 7, 2012, 01:21 PM
I'm just curious... but where did we get the heavy metals that are found in computer parts in the first place? The moon? Oh, and what are the bullets we're shooting at these computers made from? How does the weight of all the hundreds of lead bullets and buckshot that were shot at the computer compare to the weight of the heavy metals released by shooting at electronics vs. something inert?

Now generally, I'd recommend shooting over a tarp both for ease of clean-up and to prevent contamination. A clean shooting area is safer than a trashed one.

I've shot up many computers and other things. It's fun. It's interesting to see the practical effects of ballistics on electronics that have caused us stress. It's a fitting end, and of course the electronics will be recycled properly afterwards, so what's the big deal?

blarby
April 7, 2012, 01:29 PM
Not so much in newer computers, but older electronics and screens in particular contain a host of oxides used in capacitors, and mercury used in old components....both are really nasty for the environment.

The lead I'm less concerned about, for obvious reasons :) Not to mention lead is naturally occurring....not so much fulminates and sulfuric oxides.

Just a total waste of a computer !

ITs not a fitting end for something thats provided so much use... I don't take out old guns and shoot them up if they are troublesome...I fix them.

Voltia
April 7, 2012, 01:44 PM
God, the self-righteousness. It's his computer, let him do with it what he wants.

blarby
April 7, 2012, 01:54 PM
God, the self-righteousness. It's his computer, let him do with it what he wants.

Sure. For one, he allready did it :)

For two, he posted it here.... presumably to gather public comments. He got 'em :)

I'd love to know what the compy did or didn't do that warranted this..... :fire:

I've had many a troublesome or slow computer... never had the urge to destroy them.

Individual components, sure. I've had some HDD platter races in my day... I've thrown memory modules in the heap....but comps, like many guns, are modular systems.

In my eyes, he just intentionally KB'd a vintage 626 that needed to be retimed, and shot only 3" groups :)

R.W.Dale
April 7, 2012, 01:54 PM
God, the self-righteousness. It's his computer, let him do with it what he wants.

I'm telling you!

I wonder if some of these hoarders still have and drive the FIRST ONE AND ONLY automobile they've ever owned.

Its not like the desktop PC isn't the computing version of the cassette deck nowadays anyhow.

posted via mobile device.

ApacheCoTodd
April 7, 2012, 02:03 PM
Is that a question?

While I haven't done it, I can't imagine having trouble shooting one as the required stalking is limited, they have no real natural camouflage and besides, they just move so damn slowly.;)

jcwit
April 7, 2012, 02:05 PM
The computer carcass is in the back of the truck right now.


Not concerned about the carcass as you picked that up, but what about all the little pieces of trash thats left behind. Therein lies the problem.

God, the self-righteousness. It's his computer, let him do with it what he wants.

Yes thats true, but disposal should be taken care of in a better manner. Trashing the country side is not a responsible way to handle it.

Lets hope the same isn't done with old auto batteries and/or tires.

blarby
April 7, 2012, 02:08 PM
Its not like the desktop PC isn't the computing version of the cassette deck nowadays anyhow.

I can see that.

Only real difference being, anything that supports PCI on the board is still useful.

Much like say, an older vehicle.

It may not be as fast, or as spiff...but they still work :) Networks are a great thing...

Considering the fact that most users mainly use their box as a link to the web.... older PC's that can do just that and play even simple video are just as useful now as the day they were pieced together.

dcarch
April 7, 2012, 04:28 PM
You have no idea how often I've wanted to do that sort of thing. Normally when a friend is talking to me, says "just a minute", and proceeds to text another friend. I have occasional visions of drawing my handgun, and blowing said phone out of said friend's hands. :evil:

bigfinger76
April 7, 2012, 04:52 PM
Store-bought computers are not as modular as you'd think. Relax, folks.

blarby
April 7, 2012, 05:03 PM
Thats odd. I get usable pieces for my collection from store bought computers all the time. Especially the older, "useless" computers everyone leaves out on garbage day.

parsimonious_instead
April 7, 2012, 05:23 PM
That looks like a very old computer with a very old motherboard. Would likely be more of a curse than a blessing to someone, even if they needed one badly. Probably uses an IDE hard drive, which are becoming nearly impossible to buy new for a reasonable amount of money.
If the original drive is still in there, it's likely well past the five or so years you can reasonably expect it to perform before it slows to an absolute crawl and then dies.
I don't think the "fix or throw away" analogy between PCs and firearms really holds up - sure, scandisk, defrag and reinstalling an OS can deal with file table errors (logical errors) for a while, there are underlying physical wear and tear issues that no user can fix, short of having some very expensive tools and a clean room.
To keep just about any wood and blued steel firearm going indefinitely, you just need springs, solvents, oil, sandpaper and some other miscellaneous tools and chemicals that are probably not too different than what you'd use 100 years ago to keep a gun working.

danez71
April 7, 2012, 06:19 PM
Thats odd. I get usable pieces for my collection from store bought computers all the time.

Take some comfort that he just made your collection go up in value by reducing the # of collector peices left out there.


I'm more worried about the toxic fumes that he contaminated the air with from all of the rounds he shot. ;)

Sam1911
April 7, 2012, 06:51 PM
Ok. So another "hey, I shot this thing" thread. Fine. Yes, we all hope you picked up the bits and pieces and didn't leave the scraps of broken plastic and metal behind.

Don't see as it's anything to be proud of or want to share with others. And is surely isn't worth arguing about.

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