1911 break in


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wwace
April 14, 2012, 09:45 PM
I have just been lucky enough to acquire two new 1911's, a loaded Springfield and a SR1911. My question is what is a good break in procedure and what's a good break in lube?
http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120414_171349-1.jpg

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EddieNFL
April 14, 2012, 10:05 PM
Load, shoot, clean as required, repeat. A properly built handgun doesn't need breaking in.

JTQ
April 14, 2012, 10:07 PM
I always start out shooting 230gr full metal jacket (FMJ) ammo, also known as ball ammo. The pistol was originally designed for this ammo and it feeds it the best. You don't want to start out with some odd shaped bullet profile that may cause you any problems. You want to eliminate as many possibilities for problems as you can. If it works with FMJ, you can move on to other styles.

I always use some kind of CLP (Clean Lube Protect). I've used BreakFree, Ballistol, and currently SLIP 2000. Lots of guys use Hoppe's #9 or break cleaner or some other solvent to clean their guns, but the CLP's all work well for me and I only have to use one product. It never made sense to me to use some kind of degreaser to take off all the oil, only to have to put it back on.

Another thing I look for in CLP's are non-toxic versions. Since they all work well, you may as well use something non-toxic and that doesn't smell bad (Ballistol does have an "odd" aroma) either. SLIP 2000 has practically no smell I can detect, and I've read good things about WeaponShield and Frog Lube, two products I'm sure I'll try at some time in the future.

WoodchuckAssassin
April 14, 2012, 10:12 PM
Being the proud, proud owner of a Ruger 1911, I couldnít be happier to be one of the first to reply to this message! First things first, congrats on your purchases. Iím currently saving up to buy a Springfield loaded. Be sure to post a range report as soon as possible.

For the break in of my Ruger 1911, I first field stripped it, and applied a thin layer of FP-10 to all its parts. (I prefer to not use grease, but thatís a matter of personal preference). I took her to the range and put 200 rounds down range as quickly as I could, trying my hardest to make it fail. Pending one stovepipe, my range visit was a roaring success.

The next part of my break in process was a detail strip of the weapon (that is to say, taking out every pin, spring, and part), and giving everything a thorough cleaning, again, with FP-10 Lubricant. Even on a high-end 1911 like the Ruger, there was still quite a bit of factory dust that needed to be removed. I polished the trigger bow, trigger channel, disconnect face, and every pin in the thing with 1000 wet/dry sandpaper. The hammer did not need to be touched, and while I did run the sear over a fine stone VERY, VERY gently to remove some slight machining marks, I donít think this was required.

The best thing Iíve found to break in the Ruger is simple range time. If you feel comfortable detail stripping and polishing the before mentioned parts (trigger bow, trigger channel, disconnect face, and pinsÖNOT the hammer and sear), then I found that to aid in the weapons feel. I also dry-fire it incessantly. I donít think it changes anything, but itís good practice for if/when things get ugly.

The only qualm I had with my Ruger was that the trigger had a definite ďclickĒ before the hammer dropped. It wasnít a creep so much as an odd, clicking movement. Did your Ruger also have this characteristic? Iíd be interest to know whether mine was a fluke or not. Either way, the slight polishing I did made the trigger perfect. It still breaks at a nice 5.5 pounds Ė not completion worthy, but certainly good enough for home defense. Hope this helps!

rcmodel
April 14, 2012, 10:18 PM
Choot'm Lizabet! Choot'm!!

Then Clean'dm an Oil'dm.

Then Choot'm Lizabet! Choot'm!!

rc

BYJO4
April 14, 2012, 10:30 PM
Unless manufacturer states otherwise, I would clean it and then lube it with FP10 and /or Breakfree. I would at least shoot the first 200 to 300 rounds using 230 gr FMJ RN ammo.

wwace
April 15, 2012, 01:41 AM
What if my wife likes the smell of Hoppes #9? Lol, she really does. I have no idea how to do more than field strip a 1911 as of now. I am sure I will learn at some point. My SR1911 was a itty bit rough at first but working the action 40 or 50 times with synthetic lube smoothed it right out. My trigger is ok, I can feel just the slightest machine marks before she fires. I think that will be gone after a box or two of ammo.

mljdeckard
April 15, 2012, 01:46 AM
I really think that 'Break-in" periods are the manufacturer's way of forcing you to try a few different combinations of ammo and magazines before you call them to complain. I have never had any discernible difference in performance in any of the new guns I have bought. (That includes Kimber.)

stickhauler
April 15, 2012, 01:53 AM
This is the first time I've seen the Ruger 1911 called a "high-end" 1911. That title more describes custom 1911 manufacturers.

sgb
April 15, 2012, 02:04 AM
Clean, lube and shoot a couple hundred rounds. Repeat.

If it slides grease it, rotates oil it. 1911's run best well lubed.

EddieNFL
April 15, 2012, 07:24 AM
If it won't feed H&G 68s of the box, you have a problem. I have 1911s that have never shot anything but. If a manufacturer says shoot XXX rounds to correct a malfunction, move to a better product.

Shoot your carry load enough to verify reliability.

meanmrmustard
April 15, 2012, 07:29 AM
load, shoot, clean as required, repeat. A properly built handgun doesn't need breaking in.
+1. Jsi.

bubbacrabb
April 15, 2012, 08:03 AM
I'd just shoot it. 1911's were designed to shoot ball ammo, so thats what I'd shoot. I dont shoot many 230 fmj anymore, I just load thousands of 230 lrn hard cast bullets. Same effect, and cheaper since I roll my own. I have the SR1911 I love mine. Great weapon, HIGH END WEAPON to me. I'm sure you'll enjoy the Loaded as well, I also have a Springfield Range Officer that I enjoy very much except for the black on black sights so a small amount of white nail polish went on the front sight on that one. On my 1911's on basic cleaning I clean with Ballistol. Its non toxic and makes my grips pretty and its good for wood so that works out well. I do a detailed cleaning breaking the entire gun down about ever 1000 rounds. I found that youtube works really good when it comes to taking a slide apart etc. Good luck, you made some good choices.

Walkalong
April 15, 2012, 09:30 PM
As posted, clean it up, lube it, shoot it, repeat.

HKGuns
April 15, 2012, 09:46 PM
Ya ain't got no Kimber dar man, jus shoot the dern thing will ya?

x_wrench
April 16, 2012, 08:09 AM
i have always felt that any gun you are going to bet your life on, needs to have 200 rounds run thru it first. my method is to clean the gun first, to get first of all, a clean gun, but secondly, get whatever the factory uses to prevent rust off from the gun. i do not consider that lubricant. it is rust preventative. as far as lube, any light machine oil will work. you do not need anything special, and use it SPARINGLY. to much oil will only attract and hold dirt and carbon. and if you combine either of them with oil, you have a lapping compound of sorts. as far as ammo, shoot what you plan to carry, if possible. if that is to expensive for your budget, fmj's are ok. but you will need to shoot some of the ammo you plan on carrying to make certain it functions thru your gun well. personally, i would shoot 50, clean, 50 more, clean again, and then go for 100 straight. if the gun does not act up in 100 straight rounds, it is likely to never malfunction anytime you need it, as long as you keep it from getting gunked up from carrying it. and they WILL do that. you will need to clean it at least every other week, regardless if it was shot, or not.

RickMD
April 16, 2012, 08:30 AM
you will need to clean it at least every other week, regardless if it was shot, or not.

Why?

Double Naught Spy
April 16, 2012, 09:12 AM
but secondly, get whatever the factory uses to prevent rust off from the gun. i do not consider that lubricant. it is rust preventative.
So exactly what is the "rust preventative" that is being used?

I can see your point if you were talking about cosmoline, but I don't think I have seen any pistols manufactured for the civilian market in the US that came covered in cosmoline in the last couple of decates.

as far as lube, any light machine oil will work.
but not the light machine oil that came on the pistol?

to much oil will only attract and hold dirt and carbon.
Oil does not attract dirt and carbon.

you will need to clean it at least every other week, regardless if it was shot, or not.

Yeah, why?

I can see oiling it every couple of weeks if you are using light machine oil that more readily dissipates than heavier oils or grease, especially while carrying during the hot summer, but I am not sure why you think the gun should be cleaned that often if it isn't dirty.

"High End 1911".....now there is an oxymoron if there ever was one! That one even beats "Jumbo Shrimp" and "Military Intelligence". I go a hell of a laugh, thanks fellers!

I take it that you are not familiar with 1911s.

gym
April 16, 2012, 10:41 AM
Those guns just shoot after cleaning

Skylerbone
April 16, 2012, 12:08 PM
Welcome to The High Road Fuzzy. It is generally considered both impolite and of no help to interject off-topic subject matter into a discussion. We understand your exuberance for the Glock platform and what a momentous and infallabe achievement it heralded as the first, last and only reliable sidearm invented. BUT at present time a question has been asked pertaining to a different platform, watered down as it may be to you, so common courtesy dictates that it be answered.

While not in video format like the awesome YouTube, a natural historian and student of the gun may find this link well worth the read: http://www.thehighroad.org/announcement.php?a=20

Back to the OP, I can understand the sentiment that any pistol should work as delivered. I also see merit in testing reliability with a comfortable for you number of rounds. My point of contention is that if the subject were your new Lilja Match rifle barrel I think folks would be offering dozens of helpful suggestions on its care.

I would agree it needs cleaning before being fired and a good once-over to inspect for any defects. Any responsible owner should consider the same as cracks and tailings aren't things to discover at the range. A thorough break-down and post-inspection is advised as well to check things like slide stop interaction with the lower lugs and any abnormal dust cover/frame wear. A few pictures at regular intervals can help refresh the memory along with a log for each pistol with round count, maintenance performed, spring changes and preferred loads.

If you aren't familiar with lubrication points on the 1911 consult the owner's manual.

Lastly, like any other firearm, don't shoot it continuously without cool-down periods.

It takes very little effort to get more from your firearm than the average shooter does and detailed records can make just another pistol an honest family heirloom. Just my thoughts on the matter.

joecil
April 16, 2012, 12:19 PM
I clean with Gun Scrubber or Winchester's Break Free Powder Blast followed by Hoppes #9 in the barrel. I lube the slide with Tetra Grease as well as the barrel link pin with and follow that with Break Free CLP. For a brand new gun I clean and run it a bit wetter for the first 100 or so rounds of ball ammo. Not all 1911 like all JHP ammos as some can be picky when it comes to HP's.

mcdonl
April 16, 2012, 03:03 PM
Those are quality guns, I dont imagine there will be any breakin period.

Shoobee
April 16, 2012, 03:44 PM
If the 45's have not been shot for awhile, I would definitely field strip and clean them.

But I would not shoot them if I had others I could shoot.

These 2 look pristine.

Best way to keep them in mint condition is keep them clean but not shoot.

It all depends what you plan to do with them.

Fishbed77
April 16, 2012, 05:00 PM
What if my wife likes the smell of Hoppes #9?

So your wife loves the smell of rotten bananas? :)

I wish mine were more tolerant - she complains to no end when I use the stuff.

Stevie-Ray
April 16, 2012, 07:32 PM
I wish mine were more tolerant - she complains to no end when I use the stuff. Same here, though I confess to being snooty about the stench, the older I get. I've switched over to CLP or Hoppe's Elite, whichever is available and the wife is eternally happy.

x_wrench
April 17, 2012, 07:50 AM
WOW. THANKS for the roasting DOUBLE NAUGHT SPY. i will try to remember to return the favor!

i do not know what was on my pistol when i bought it. or if it came from the factory, or if the store people put it on, or???. but it was more tacky than lubricant, and i sure would not shoot it that way. and i have purchased other guns including rifles that had a similar coating on them, from different places.

as far as oil does not attract dirt or carbon, you should look at the motor oil that comes from your car or trucks crankcase. attracting and keeping dirt and carbon in suspension is part of its job. that way the oil filter can remove the larger particles, and the smaller stuff comes out when you change the oil. certainly guns do not have these. but if you do not belive me, take a cleaning patch, and wipe a nice thin coating all over the internals of your favorite pistol, and go shoot 100 rounds thru it. you will be amazed at the filth that collects. do any of us put that much lube on our guns normally, no. but i am making a point here. oil DOES attract dirt and carbon. no, it is not like a magnet, it will not pull dirt from 30 feet away like a star trek tractor beam. do you remember the old oil bath air cleaners on cars from before 1960? did they work great, no, but they did work. the oil that was in them was not clean very long.

as far as cleaning your carry weapon every 2 weeks, shot or not. you should maybe put some glasses on and look at your weapon once in a while. remember, this is what you are BETTING YOUR AND OR YOUR FAMILIES LIFE ON if and when the time comes. mine routinely collects lint, and a small amount of dust and debris. and if i ever have to use it, i want it to work.

mljdeckard
April 17, 2012, 08:39 AM
You might also ask yourself; If a gun is likely to malfunction from a little bit of dirt or lint.....is it REALLY a gun on which you WANT to bet the lives of yourself and your family?

joecil
April 17, 2012, 09:42 AM
Here is something I've done on the packing grease some of these manufacturer's use, Taurus uses it on everything. I strip the gun down as much as I'm comfortable with, in the case of a 1911 pretty much dismantled. I then put it in a stainless steel pan and soak it for about 10 minutes in rubbing alcohol. Then remove it and let it air dry followed by putting it back together oil/greasing as needed then normal cleaning and lubing. I only do this on guns new in the box and before even taking them to the range. It is just my personal method and a suggestion. I've found over the years rubbing alcohol is a great degrease as well as de-ices locks.

RickMD
April 17, 2012, 09:44 AM
as far as cleaning your carry weapon every 2 weeks, shot or not. you should maybe put some glasses on and look at your weapon once in a while. remember, this is what you are BETTING YOUR AND OR YOUR FAMILIES LIFE ON if and when the time comes. mine routinely collects lint, and a small amount of dust and debris. and if i ever have to use it, i want it to work.

I suggest you consider hiring a cleaning lady...

Pete D.
April 17, 2012, 06:15 PM
Load, shoot, clean as required, repeat. A properly built handgun doesn't need breaking in.
+3. That is the best response so far.
About cleaning...how dirty a gun can you tolerate?
I have a Gold Cup that I have been shooting a weekly gallery match with since December. With the matches and practice, it has a couple of thousand rounds through it since then. I have not done anything other than pull a boresnake through it every now and then and keep it oiled.
Tonight is the last match. I will strip it and put all the parts in an ultrasonic cleaner. Then I will dry it clean of any remaining dirt and oil it up.
It has not failed to fire or been the least bit cantankerous during this last few months.
Pete

cuba
April 17, 2012, 06:46 PM
Try boosting your hammer about 10 times and that will probably take care of the itty bitty roughness you feel

wwace
April 18, 2012, 02:28 AM
Thanks for all the helpfull advice guys. I am in no way new to firearms as I have been around them all my life, I shot my first moose at 11, and I had to put down about a dozen Snowshoe Hares to do so, in 1971. I was mainly concerned not to break any rules of the Holy Grail of John Moses Browning, the 1911. I have many other handguns I can carry, I hope to add the 1911's to that flock.

Most of my experience is with shotguns, I shot a bit of skeet and lots of trap competitions until sporting clays came about and I did that heavily for over ten years until neck injuries forced me to quit. I love shotguns, I wore out my first model 37 featherweight before I was 14. This early experience led me to develop better methods of care to prevent wear if I can. I did do a test once though with a Beretta 390 where I fired over 6000 rounds without cleaning it besides the barrel and it never failed once in any way. As a matter of fact that gun only failed once when a stray pellet got into the trigger group. Here is a pic of my K80:

http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120409_171606.jpg

Feanor
April 18, 2012, 03:19 AM
Those are quality guns, I dont imagine there will be any breakin period.
Well the SA is a quality production pistol, you can hardly say the same of the Ruger at this early stage, it is simply to new to qualify as such, they(factory)are not even able to produce a few hundred of them per month, leaving hundreds if not thousands of customers waiting many many months to obtain one.

With Ruger, quality is almost totally subjective.

mcdonl
April 18, 2012, 10:20 AM
With Ruger, quality is almost totally subjective.

My post is pretty subjective. I have an ATI 1911 and I have put about a bucket of wheel weights through it (1,000's of rounds of lead) without any issues... 3 IDPA seaons (I suck at it, but not the guns fault) countless trips to the range and hard carry...

That being said... those guns the OP posted are quality guns compared to mine and mine needed zero breakin.

wwace
April 19, 2012, 12:50 AM
Update: The Springfield got here but I can't get it until next week as my FFL can only do one transfer per week without going thru extra paperwork. First impression of the Springfield loaded is that is super nice, smooth and tight. I had left the SR1911 with him to clean up the trigger and he did a full blown trigger job on her. And he went out and tested it! What a nice guy, shooting my gun before I got a chance. Anyway he loves the Ruger! He reports that the sights are dead on and he is going to buy one for personal carry. So now my Ruger has about 3lb trigger pull and I will have to do the Springer also cause it is about 5.5lb.
http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120418_130809.jpg
http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120418_130750.jpg
http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120418_130718.jpg

wwace
April 19, 2012, 01:06 AM
My post is pretty subjective. I have an ATI 1911 and I have put about a bucket of wheel weights through it (1,000's of rounds of lead) without any issues... 3 IDPA seaons (I suck at it, but not the guns fault) countless trips to the range and hard carry...

That being said... those guns the OP posted are quality guns compared to mine and mine needed zero breakin.
I never implied that the pistols needed to be broken in to operate correctly, what I was searching for is more like a correct method of oiling, cleaning, and any other measures to enhance the operation and lifespan of my weapons.

Also, I believe Ruger builds very high quality firearms. I would not own over 20 of them if I wasn't happy with them. I have only broken a magazine spring in an old M77 so my failure rate is pretty good so far. The SR 1911 being a new product will have bugs, people can badmouth the cast receivers and whatnot but there are many more glowing reviews about the SR1911 than about any other new gun I have seen lately. I know what to expect from Ruger and I will continue to support them by purchasing their products.

mcdonl
April 19, 2012, 07:49 AM
I got it wwace... If you find any good information on oiling vs grease let me know... I still just use oil but I have to work the slide a few times after cleaning to get it so it is smooth like butter... I figured it I put on something more like butter I can skip that step :)

I like Rugers too.... Picking up my "new" blackhawk today.

Skylerbone
April 19, 2012, 10:33 AM
wwace, I'd suggest the Wilson Combat channel on YouTube (and I hate YouTube in general). If you Google Wilson Combat 1911 lubrication you can go right to it.

As a precaution against the "idiot scratch" I posted some info on the "log man slide stop modification" here: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=654073 at post #25.

wwace
April 19, 2012, 02:50 PM
I got it wwace... If you find any good information on oiling vs grease let me know... I still just use oil but I have to work the slide a few times after cleaning to get it so it is smooth like butter... I figured it I put on something more like butter I can skip that step :)

I like Rugers too.... Picking up my "new" blackhawk today.
Umm, this is why I couldn't get the Loaded this week.
http://i972.photobucket.com/albums/ae206/wwace/20120418_204234.jpg

Greg528iT
April 19, 2012, 03:07 PM
Ruger Black Hawk in 45 Colt. OK that's a good enough reason to push back the Springfiled Loaded.. but ONLY for a little bit. I want to see BOTH in a picture here soon. :D

Greg528iT
April 19, 2012, 03:12 PM
A well machined piece like a Springfield or Ruger (Wilson, Brown, Colt etc) should NOT need to be broken in to run flawlessly. really you are breaking in a gun, until you've shot it out and needs to be rebuilt or replaced. Every shot I put down my Springfield it get just a bit smoother. Think of the 1st 200 rounds as a shake down run. Just to get yourself familiar with it.

Nicky Santoro
April 19, 2012, 04:24 PM
OP,
I'd treat a new gun as if it were filthy and clean and lube it carefully. Who knows what lube or preservative it has or it doesn't have? Then shoot it as much as you choose then clean it before you put it up. I've yet to have a problem doing it this way.

SlamFire1
April 19, 2012, 07:11 PM
If you are just going to the range, oil the heck out of it.

Barrel, recoil plug, locking lugs, slide rails, under neath slide, barrel link and lower lug.

Bullseye shooters used to tell me the elbow was the drip point. ;)

I prefer oil. Grease gets impacted in, takes more time to wipe out. Oil cleans up so much faster.

Pete D.
April 20, 2012, 07:14 AM
It occurs to me that when we buy a new gun and take it to the range to shoot, that we are really breaking in the shooter, not the gun.

MYREDTAIL
August 25, 2012, 05:55 PM
I field stripped my new 1911, & cleaned it with EEZOX as their web site suggested. Let it dry on over night, Then wiped it down & re applied a light coat on all of the parts. and on the Slide & barrel lug's I applied some of Brian Eno's Slide -Guide right over the EEZOX, wiped down the excess, & re assembled the gun. & worked the slide a few times etc. Ruger 1911 owners & Ruger as well,, Says that the gun does not have to be shot of 300 rds to be broken in Does anyone know if this is fact or fiction.? :confused: :cool:

EddieNFL
August 26, 2012, 08:56 AM
Says that the gun does not have to be shot of 300 rds to be broken in Does anyone know if this is fact or fiction.?

Anything mechanical will "break-in" during initial use. Confusion arises when folks think break-in means "will correct malfunctions." At least one manufacturer expects you to fire 500 rounds to finish what they should have done at the factory.

wow6599
August 26, 2012, 10:11 AM
At least one manufacturer expects you to fire 500 rounds to finish what they should have done at the factory.

Which one.....and what gun?

1911Tuner
August 26, 2012, 10:38 AM
Confusion arises when folks think break-in means "will correct malfunctions."

This.

The 1911 was designed to function. If it's correctly built to spec and fed decent ammunition from a proper magazine, it will function. It's a machine. It doesn't have a choice.

Which one.....and what gun?

Les Baer. All of'em.

CommanderCrusty
August 26, 2012, 09:54 PM
A 1911 shoudn't need a break in--but it does need reliability testing.

I would never, ever buy ANY 1911 from anyone at any price and not expect to send it back to the factory for repair. You may not have to, but please don't ever buy a 1911 (well, honestly, ANY automatic, but especially the 1911s) and ASSUME it will work properly out of the box. I know, I know, YOURS did, your brother's uncle's sister's did, but I have seen too many that didn't and heard too many excuses from 1911 owners for guns that are simply not reliable--yet.

Put 200 rounds of factory ball ammo through it, then reevaluate. If all is well, put 200 rounds of your favorite factory defensive load through it and reevaluate. If you need to send the pistol in for warranty repair, START OVER with you reliability testing.

The 1911 CAN be a reliable handgun (mine is--now) but it needs to be proven reliable or be MADE reliable by an experienced, professional pistol smith.

EddieNFL
August 27, 2012, 07:29 PM
DeVry must offer advanced degrees in Internetology.

Skylerbone
August 27, 2012, 08:19 PM
Got my minor in Bowling Technology Fundamentals at DeVry. It's where I learned to curve projectiles and wait tables.

Trust but verify? Sure, same with anything. I see break-in period as a get acquainted, feel the recoil, don't limp wrist your Beretta, choose your grip insert size and see period. If I didn't trust a particular model firearm to run before I bought it...well I'd save my money.

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