Is it "taking a chance" with a new design?


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Orion8472
April 15, 2012, 01:59 PM
I'm wanting to get the new Sig P938 for what I feel will be excellent conceal carry characteristics. However, my brother suggested that I wait a year to "let the bugs get worked out". Seems like good advice, . . . not wanting to be "a beta tester" for a gun maker, . . . . however, is this waiting actually necessary?

How much pre-release testing do gun makers do before releasing a gun for purchase?

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bigfatdave
April 15, 2012, 02:06 PM
Depends on the gun

Sometimes the manufacturer misses something, sometimes they ignore an incompatibility with an accessory, sometimes a materials issue doesn't become known until a few thousand rounds in on some guns, and the one the maker blasted a pallet of ammo through didn't have that minor flaw.

If I'm getting an example of a new design, I test the crap out of it and don't put it in serious service (CC/defense/etc) until I'm satisfied with it. The same applies to all guns, I'm just more thorough with new designs.

T Bran
April 15, 2012, 02:13 PM
I also dont buy the first year or two on vehicles or any other big ticket item , sounds like good advice to me.
I also understand the gotta have one of those aspect as I often suffer the same ailment but I am learning to keep it at bay.
Luck
T

Manson
April 15, 2012, 02:34 PM
I'm with your brother. I never buy a new car or gun during the first year of production.

BamAlmighty
April 15, 2012, 03:42 PM
Are you a gambling man?

Buying first production anything usually heightens the risk of fail.

Jamie B
April 15, 2012, 04:10 PM
Wise words. Never buy the first iteration of anything.
These days, bug testing is done by consumers.
Manufacturers are in a rush to get a new product to market.

wally
April 15, 2012, 05:50 PM
Based on SIG's P238 if you will be upset about potentially having to send it back for repair, I'd strongly suggest waiting.

Reputable companies will pay the shipping if you get one that doesn't work and will make it right eventually. If you like being and "early adopter" and being among the first to play with a new toy, go for it! And tell us how it works out.

Orion8472
April 15, 2012, 11:51 PM
Wally, it is intersting that you would bring that up. I was going to inquire about the fact that the P938 isn't exactly a new design, just a slightly upsized one from the P238. There have been issues with some of them, but have those been the earlier ones? I also thought it had something to do with the magazines and that was fixed with a new follower. . . . or something like that.

Anyway, I'm really not sure what I want to do. I need to find a carry gun that will work for me [which the Sig has my requirements] because right now, I'm carrying an old [1970 something] F.I. Industries Model D .380acp gun that I doubt I would find parts for, thus don't really like shooting it much. . . . thus meaning I'm not training enough with it. Just not sure what to do or which way to go at the moment. Thinking I shouldn't have sold my EMP, . . . but it was just a bit too big for MY purposes.

OcelotZ3
April 16, 2012, 12:35 AM
I've "rolled the dice" on 3 handguns & 1 car, buying the first of a new model.

Ruger SR9: Gun recalled due to possible firing when dropped. They sent a prepaid box, which I returned with the gun and they returned the gun with a new trigger mechanism. The gun worked fine before & after, and they sent me an additional magazine & a hat. Impact to me was minimal as I could do without it a few days.

Colt New Agent: Gun recalled due to recoil spring issues. Again, a box was sent to me and sending it in & getting back was trivial. They fixed whatever the problem was, and they also replaced the plunger spring/tube as they felt it was too tight (I thought it was too but didn't mention it). Gun has always worked great, both before/after.

Boberg XR9-S: Some people had problems with light primer strikes so they sent me a new spring... Then later they sent another spring, because the first increased the trigger pull enough that some people didn't like it. I haven't had any issues so I just have extra springs in case I need them.

1995 Chevy Blazer: This was a brand new model, completely changed from previous generation Blazers. This gamble turned out pretty good as we had no problems/major repairs or even minor repairs until the engine grenaded at 173k miles. Most of those miles were very short trips in-town or to work (3-4 miles from start to stop), so the truck barely even got warmed up. I consider the engine life pretty good for that abuse.

As others have noted, you are taking a risk with first models of things and history definitely indicates that there are often issues... But if you buy from a reputable company such as Ruger, Colt, S&W, etc. they will stand by their products and make it right.

There are a few parts for the FI available, but you'll probably have to search the internet for some. Or you could just buy a whole new gun on Gunbroker.

FI Parts: http://www.gunpartscorp.com/catalog/Products.aspx?catid=2126

mj246
April 16, 2012, 07:06 AM
I'd like to point out that while often with new designs of anything, there is more risk of it having a few bugs to work out, SOMEBODY needs to buy them or they will be discontinued whether they work or not.

IMO if you want something that's relatively new, can afford it, and it comes from a company you trust to both put out a decent product with very limited chance of serious failure as well as make it right if there is a problem then GET IT.

The last thing I would want is to pass on a good design just because it's new and wind up with only a few runs being made due to low sales, thus making it hard to find and more pricey than originally intended.

Orion8472
April 16, 2012, 07:55 AM
Ocelot, I was unaware of that parts site. Thanks! :D

mj, you make a good point. Something to consider on this topic. Someone has to buy it or they will stop making them. I just hope it doesn't turn into another horror story like the Kimber Solo. Those are apparently not fairing too well. But again, the P938 is just a slighly bigger P238, and many issues seem to have been resolved with that gun. :)

Having said that, I may have to find a Sig forums site to see how they talk about the P238.

Jamie B
April 16, 2012, 04:16 PM
I'd like to point out that while often with new designs of anything, there is more risk of it having a few bugs to work out, SOMEBODY needs to buy them or they will be discontinued whether they work or not.
Nope. There is sufficient technology and failure testing that needs to take place at the factory.
This is the responsibility of all manufacturers.

Orion8472
April 16, 2012, 06:32 PM
Realistically, . . . a LOT of guns come out with few if any issues. I understand being cautious, but I may live life on the edge, so to speak.

Orion8472
April 18, 2012, 07:51 AM
I wonder what percentage of new designs never had any issues? Glock? 1911 design? Hi Power design? Etc....

TurtlePhish
April 18, 2012, 08:44 AM
Two words. Kel-Tec.

Manson
April 18, 2012, 09:16 AM
Orion. i'm a sig nut. I own several and I'm on a sig board. Everyone who owns a p238 with the new mag loves them. They are spoken of as soft and reliable shooters.

Orion8472
April 18, 2012, 12:50 PM
Thanks for relaying that piece of information, Manson. I'm really hoping that being a P938 beta tester will be a positive experience for me.

wally
April 18, 2012, 08:21 PM
Two words. Kel-Tec.

Sure if you like returning guns for repair, two of my six Kel-Tecs have had to go back, one more then once. All were out well past a year before I got them.

Usertag
April 18, 2012, 08:31 PM
Most guns are almost perfected from the time of the release, so I would not worry about any bugs or small problems. Usally a gun company will put it through intense torture and testing; before shelfing it. Especially a gun company such as Sig, just look at the success of the Sig P226, P228, and the P229. If there is anything you find to be a problem, just send it in to Sig for a fix-up, you should get the problem resolved for free. Also a little range testing wouldn't hurt to check if it fits your specs. After all if you need it, a smooth running handgun could be the difference between life or death. So my final answer is Yes, to go out and get it......... Unless it's a High Point. :)

CountryUgly
April 18, 2012, 09:35 PM
I bought a kel-tec in 9mm four years ago because my wife liked it so it was going to be her CC gun. With that being said I was going to shoot the heck out of it to make sure it was up to par, 60 or so rounds into it the take down pin sheared the head off and the slide came totally off when recoiling. I'm done being a beta tester.

This is a Sig we are talking about so even in the off chance you end up with one with issues the company is solid and should treat you well.

TurtlePhish
April 18, 2012, 10:09 PM
Sure if you like returning guns for repair, two of my six Kel-Tecs have had to go back, one more then once. All were out well past a year before I got them.


I was trying to imply that Kel-Tec has a tendency to use buyers as testers.

rspeters
April 18, 2012, 10:25 PM
Everybody has to get something brand new a least once or twice in their life

jmr40
April 19, 2012, 07:33 AM
Are you a gambling man?

Buying first production anything usually heightens the risk of fail.


That is why it is gambling. It can go both ways. Sometimes 1st year production is best and quality goes down from there. I'd much rather own a 1st year production Mustang, Smith & Wesson 27, Winchester 94, Colt SAA, Colt 1911, or Chevy Z-28 than current production versions of the same.

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