CCI vs Remington primers


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7mmb
April 16, 2012, 02:05 AM
I've been reloading for over ten years now and have used CCI primers almost exclusively. All of my pet loads I worked up with CCIs. Well, CCIs have become scarce around here and one gun store worker told me that they have been having trouble stocking them for a while and can't take orders. Sportsman's Warehouse was the only place I could find that had any brand of large and small pistol primers in stock, and that brand was Remington. I bought 1000 of each as I'm almost out of primers. My question is how much difference will the Remingtons have over the CCIs? Can I just substitute them or do I need to work up my loads all over again? Maybe just try a few rounds with the new primers and my existing loads and chronograph them and see what difference, if any, they make? I load 357, 9mm, 45 ACP and 45 Colt. I do all of my chrono testing with my Blackhawk convertibles so I have a whole lot of leeway if I go a little over pressure. That and when I'm testing auto pistol rounds I don't need to be distracted about where my brass is landing and I can concentrate on not shooting my chronograph!

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Waywatcher
April 16, 2012, 02:24 AM
It definitely depends on a load-by-load basis.

Just FYI: Rem 1 1/2 is not for 357, 40 etc. and Rem 6 1/2 is not for .223, 5.56 etc.

joneb
April 16, 2012, 03:03 AM
Can I just substitute them or do I need to work up my loads all over again?
If your loads are near max I would reduce the charge by 5%. My 38spl load with a 158gr LSWC using W-231 at 4.2gr was about the same with CCI 500, WSP and Fed 100 I tried rem 1 1/2 and the load was noticeably warmer.

steve4102
April 16, 2012, 08:38 AM
What Rem primers did you purchase?

The correct answer to your question is, Anytime you change a component you should drop the charge down and work back up". For me it depends on the cartridge and the load. If my load is already on the low/weak side I may just go with it, if it's up there at the Max end, I will drop down and work back up.

rg1
April 16, 2012, 10:14 AM
In my tests comparing Win LP, CCI 300, and RP 2 1/2 primers in 45 ACP the CCI 300 is the mildest primer. RP 2 1/2 in all loads tested gave 20-50 fps more velocity than the CCI 300. If you're shooting maximum loads then I'd drop back your powder charge switching from CCI 300's to RP 2 1/2's. Different loads or calibers could show a different result. As mentioned, RP 6 1/2 primers are not for high pressure rifle cartridges and RP 1 1/2 is not for high pressure pistol cartridges.

ArchAngelCD
April 16, 2012, 01:38 PM
I gave Remington primers a try back during the "shortage" and they worked just fine. They are like stated above a little warmer than the CCI primers, at least they seemed to be to me. Use good reloading safety practices and you will be fine.

7mmb
April 16, 2012, 01:54 PM
The primers I got are 1 1/2s and 2 1/2s. I still have enough CCI550s for full power 357 Magnum loads but I use standard primers in 357 with Universal and plated bullets for plinking loads. CCI550s are still available locally too (for now I guess.) I suppose I need to back off a little bit and see where I'm at with the Remingtons. I wonder what's up with CCI. I hope the shortage is because ATK got that huge contract with Homeland Security and not people freaking out about the prospect of Obama being reelected. We don't need another shortage like in 2008.

moxie
April 16, 2012, 01:54 PM
I've tried all the domestic brands and never noticed any difference whatsoever. I buy whatever's cheapest. The only exception is loading for the AR. Although I get the same performance with different primers, I've chosen to stick with CCI as a prudent measure in light of the potential for slam fires.

Powder Valley has oodles of CCIs in stock:

http://powdervalleyinc.com/

ArchAngelCD
April 16, 2012, 02:00 PM
Just be aware the Remington 5 1/2 primers are best in full power .357 Magnum loads. When using lower charges where the pressures aren't that high I'm guessing the 1 1/2 primers are fine. I have never tried their 1 1/2 primers in a .357 Magnum load, only the CCI 550 primers.

DO NOT use their 6 1/2 primers in semi-auto rifle rounds. They are very soft and are the most likely primers to cause a slam-fire. Remington tells you this themselves...

Husker_Fan
April 16, 2012, 02:34 PM
Remington recommends against 1 1/2 primers in high pressure rounds like .357 mag or .40 S&W because you can get pierced primers at those pressures, even without using slow burning magnum primers like H110.

I use the 5 1/2s all the time with 2400 even though the powder doesn't need a magnum primer to burn well.

Jeff H
April 16, 2012, 05:00 PM
I use the 5 1/2s all the time with 2400 even though the powder doesn't need a magnum primer to burn well.

I do too but the reason is that the 5 1/2 isn't truly a magnum primer. It is no hotter than the 1 1/2, it just has a thicker cup so the primer doesn't get pierced with the high pressure rounds. There is plenty of info floating around on the net to verify this if you search a little.

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