best M1 carbine conversion?


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jason41987
April 17, 2012, 02:50 AM
i was kind of curious about the M1 carbine conversions i see floating around... 38 supers, 9x23, 357 magnum, various wildcat cartridges...

so im wondering, is there any M1 carbine based conversion that delivers adequate punch for such a small, light weight package?... i know 357 magnum out of a carbine length barrel produces 7.62x39 and 30-30 energies... are there any other options?

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Robert
April 17, 2012, 03:02 AM
30 Carbine is pretty near 357 levels already. Why not just stick with it? Though I have not priced 30 Carbine recently so that may have something to do with it. I have never heard of converting a M1 Carbine but, hey I learn new things everyday.

gunnutery
April 17, 2012, 03:34 AM
I've always thought a .357 mag carbine in semi-auto would be cool. A lot of people brush it off as rimmed cases being unreliable, but there are enough .357 mag auto pistols to make me a believer.

I don't know if it'd be worth it to do the conversion money-wise, but you'd open up a whole lot of ammo choices compared to .30 carbine.

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 05:35 AM
robert, to answer your question, .30 carbine with an 18 inch barrel does in fact come quite close to 357 magnum... from a pistol barrel, but from velocities measured firing 357 magnum from an 18 inch barrel, it has about double the energy as the 30 carbine...

im not sure how i feel about rimmed ammunition in a magazine myself... its entirely possibly for the top round being fed into the chamber to have its rimmed hooked by the rim of the next cartridge in the magazine... though studying the dimensions and pressures of .223, you could hack the neck off and have something with almost exactly the same width and length of 357 magnum with a rim...so one idea i had was doing that...

i wonder how much energy 9x23 or 38 super would have (both of which approach the energy of a 357 magnum) through a rifle barrel for the possibility of having a combination carbine and converted 1911 pistol for a one-ammo fits all package between the two... similar to how they had the 1911 and thompson in WWII, but with more energy... i mean, id never actually attempt to convert a semi-auto thompson because i doubt it could handle the pressures, which leads me towards the M1 carbine

also, .30 carbine has an overall length of what? 40-42mm?.. that gives you a lot more options

Robert
April 17, 2012, 06:42 AM
Ahhhh ok I am tracking now.

Sam1911
April 17, 2012, 09:27 AM
Where are you seeing these conversions "floating around?" Who's making them? On what guns? GI surplus carbines?

Shear_stress
April 17, 2012, 09:40 AM
robert, to answer your question, .30 carbine with an 18 inch barrel does in fact come quite close to 357 magnum... from a pistol barrel, but from velocities measured firing 357 magnum from an 18 inch barrel, it has about double the energy as the 30 carbine...
Not really. The M1 carbine gets a 110 grain slug going about 1900 fps. That's an ME of about 900 ft-lbs. A bit less than some .357 loads out of a rifle (1000-1200 ft-lbs), but certainly not half the energy.

GCBurner
April 17, 2012, 09:41 AM
The only one I've actually seen is the 5.7mm Johnson, AKA the .22 Spitfire, a .30 Carbine round necked down to .22 calibre for 3,000 fps velocities. It's kind of similar to the current 5.7x28mm FN, but was loaded with a 40 grain bullet, rather than the FN's 23gr.-31gr. loads. Since the Johnson round is pretty much a handload-only choice, I wonder if anyone has tried converting an M1 Carbine to use the 5.7mm FN round?

RCArms.com
April 17, 2012, 09:48 AM
Best conversion I've seen is the "Advisors Carbine"

Stock M1A1 Carbine (in the WWII Folding Paratrooper Stock) with a barrel cut back to 12".

Yes, It's a SBR that requires a stamp, but the resulting weapon is light, handy, reasonably accurate to 150 yards, just short of .357 Magnum level performance, and controllable due to the light recoil characteristics.

It was a semi-official configuration used by our officers in Vietnam with many of them being created in-country at the unit depot level.

Don

Carl N. Brown
April 17, 2012, 09:51 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5.7mm_Spitfire

About the only conversion for M1 Carbine with any practical use: .30 Carbine necked to .22, (50gr bullet at 2,700 fps velocity, 810 ft/lbs energy.)

Introduced 1963 by Melvin M. Johnson; Numrich Arms/Gun Parts Corp had barrels, headspace gauges, ammo, etc. in stock last time I checked.

IIRC Universal made a .44 mag pump-action rifle based on the M1 Carbine.

The carbine was designed by a team at Winchester around the .30 SL cartridge for WWII, and conversions to other calibers just have not been successful or popular.

For that matter, has anyone in USA seen any of the .270 Winchester caliber M1 Garands made by the civilian Springfield Armory for sale in countries where military calibers are verboten to civilan gun owners? Just as a M1 Garand in any caliber other than .30-06 is unAmerican, a M1 carbine in anything other than .30 Carbine is just wrong.

Steel Horse Rider
April 17, 2012, 09:52 AM
I had a chance to buy a M-1 carbine cut to pistol length in early 1970's. I have continually kicked myself for not buying it since that time.

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 09:55 AM
i in good conscience could never modify an old military rifle... i cant even bring myself to like an M1 garand in anything but .30-06, even if .308 is more readily available and just as powerful... i was mostly asking out of curiosity as one person converted their own and it seemed like the best platform for a .357 mag carbine since the cartridges are almost exactly the same size...

so it was just curiosity for the most part.. to see if it would even be worth it or not

Carl N. Brown
April 17, 2012, 09:57 AM
"Advisors Carbine" the stuff of true legends. Take a M1A1 folding stock, cut a relief for the selector switch, drop in a M2 carbine, tack weld a front sight on the barrel band, adjust to match the rear sight alignment to the front sight, chop the barrel off 2" in front of the barrel band, final sight adjustments, BAM! PDW!!

bannockburn
April 17, 2012, 09:59 AM
The only caliber conversion that I can recall was for the 5.7mm. Spitfire designed by Melvin Johnson.

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 10:00 AM
problem is the 5.7x28 seems to be less powerful than 30 carbine.. so youd be going backwards with that.. but if you were going to go with a wildcar, why not neck .30 carbine to 6.8?...

also, whats the wall thickness on a .30 carbine case?

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 10:01 AM
carl.. you want an old PDW?... C-96 mauser... select fire, 7.63x25 was one of the most powerful handgun cartridges before 357 mag, and it even had an attachable stock for a profile about as compact and powerful as an FN P90... so close to a 120 year old PDW

451 Detonics
April 17, 2012, 10:24 AM
I owned a 44 Mag M1 Carbine conversion, it was not only converted in caliber but also was changed to a pump action. They were made by Universal in the 60's and the model was the Vulcan 440. I sold mine after I spent several months trying to find extra mags with no success.

http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z271/reloader1959/rifles/Vulright30.jpg

Carl N. Brown
April 17, 2012, 10:43 AM
I have seen complaints about "where can i find a Universal Vulcan magazine" over the years since the 1970s. That's the problem with some of the carbine caliber conversions. (The Iver Johnson 9mm used modified Browning Hi-Power magazines.) The 5.7 Spitfire had the advantage of using standard .30 M1 Carbine magazines.

kludge
April 17, 2012, 10:50 AM
.45 Win Mag.

USSR
April 17, 2012, 11:19 AM
Forget about the .357 Magnum conversion. It won't kill anything that the .30 Carbine won't as well. I would (and did) concentrate on upgrading the M1 Carbine with a collapsible stock and better sights.

Don

http://ussr.clarityconnect.com/M1A1A.jpg

adelbridge
April 17, 2012, 05:29 PM
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa471/jhnrckr/101_1217.jpg Here is my "conversion" same .30 carbine ammo. I have had so many issues with aftermarket hack jobs trying to re chamber a rifle to do what it wasnt designed to do.

moxie
April 17, 2012, 07:06 PM
I had a stock M-2 with folding stock in Vietnam, but it was still .30 carbine.

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 08:16 PM
im curious... max pressure in a 30 carbine cartridge is 40,000 PSI... what is the limiting factor of this?.. is it the wall thickness of the case or the action itself?.. im wondering if a +P load is possible?

moxie
April 17, 2012, 09:52 PM
I should add that, despite the coolness factor of the folding stock, unless you really need a folding stock, don't get one. They are a real POS. Wobble and creak.

jason41987
April 17, 2012, 11:42 PM
i agree with moxie... i hate folding AND telescoping stocks.. theyre rarely comfortable anyway

USSR
April 18, 2012, 07:15 AM
I should add that, despite the coolness factor of the folding stock, unless you really need a folding stock, don't get one. They are a real POS. Wobble and creak.

Hmm, my Italian built M1A1 folding stock doesn't have that problem.

Don

bikerdoc
April 18, 2012, 07:30 AM
Before anyone hacks, coverts, or otherwise messes with a M1 carbine pm me for a cash offer

jason41987
April 18, 2012, 07:46 AM
i wouldnt do anything like this to a military rifle, if one at all... doesnt anyone sell reproductions?

jason41987
April 18, 2012, 07:50 AM
it would appear auto ordinance M1 carbines are the same price as original WWII models.. so id get a brand new one if i were to do something like this.. save the originals for collections as they begin to get more and more rare

JShirley
April 19, 2012, 04:22 PM
.30-06..308 is more readily available and just as powerful

Not actually.

A Federal 150-grain SP (3006A) leaves the muzzle at 2910 fps.
A Federal .308 SP in same weight (308A) leaves the muzzle at 2820.

Granted, these are fairly close. The difference expands when you go heavier, though.

P308E (180-grain Nosler Partition): 2570 fps.
P3006F (same bullet): 2700 fps.

Not only is this a much larger velocity difference than that seen in the lighter bullet loads, but since the weight is 30 grains higher, the energy difference is even more significant, with the .308 delivering 2640 ft-lbs at the muzzle, vs. 2913 ft-lbs for the '06. That's 273 ft-lbs of difference, right there.

180 grain is the heaviest bullet Federal loads for the .308, while they load up to a 220 grain bullet for the .30-06. The 200 grain Bear Claw leaves the muzzle at 2540 fps, which gives it 2865 ft-lbs of energy, which is 225 ft-lbs more energy in a round with greater sectional density. These seemingly small differences may seem a lot more important if you're the type of guy who wants to be able to use one caliber for hunting heavy game in North America. With practice, a .30-06 seems like a reasonable round for just about any big game in North America, while .308 seems a little underpowered for the really big stuff.

If you're talking about defending against humans, on the other hand- hell, anything more powerful than a .22 Magnum rifle is powerful enough. :D

------

I used to really want a little 9x23mm carbine, but Winchester White Box 9x23mm (a soft point that actually expanded) is no longer the same price as 9x19mm ball!

There were several stories, some years ago, about caliber conversions being done on M1 Carbines, but I only really heard about one guy doing them.


John

RCArms.com
April 19, 2012, 04:28 PM
Before anyone hacks, coverts, or otherwise messes with a M1 carbine pm me for a cash offer
I'm going to SBR one of mine into an "Advisors Carbine"

I've got three original Inlands, one Natl Postal Meter, and one IBM left to choose from. One of the Inlands is likely to get the axe. I don't think the world will miss one M1 Carbine.

velocette
April 19, 2012, 05:43 PM
You talk about a conversion, well this one is still .30 carbine but it has been converted.
I traded for this rifle almost exactly as you see it, so don't have a hissy fit.

Roger
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/RogerS_photo/carbinear12-11004.jpg
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/RogerS_photo/carbinear12-11003.jpg

RCArms.com
April 19, 2012, 06:22 PM
You talk about a conversion, well this one is still .30 carbine but it has been converted.
I traded for this rifle almost exactly as you see it, so don't have a hissy fit.

Roger
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/RogerS_photo/carbinear12-11004.jpg
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/RogerS_photo/carbinear12-11003.jpg
That is old-school workmanship.

I got a slightly sported carbine as part of a trade that my daughter really likes, but it's no where near as elagant as yours.

Don

SHR970
April 19, 2012, 07:25 PM
As kludge said, 45 Win Mag. There was an outfit (I believe Lemag was the name) in the 90's that was converting carbines to 45 WM, the 15 round mags held 7 and the 30 rounders held 15. The problem was that the bolts would eventually shear the locking lugs off. :what: This outfit performed conversions in several calibers but 45 WM was the popular one. If a bolt was made andfitted that would hold up, a 45 WM conversion would make the little carbine an interesting close range thumper.

Variations of 22 carbine were done in the 60's...22 Casull, 22 Carbine, 22 Brown, 5.7 Spitfire. Also there was the 17 Pee Wee (that would be a fun little round for todays market).

Edit to add: Read this article, it is a good summary gunzone article (http://www.thegunzone.com/carbine-wildcat.html)

.303
April 19, 2012, 10:34 PM
I should add that, despite the coolness factor of the folding stock, unless you really need a folding stock, don't get one. They are a real POS. Wobble and creak.
I have an Auto Ordinance M1A1, and the stock exhibits none of those problems. I think you may have had a bad experience with a cheap repro, like a ramline. AO for classic and Choate for modern folders are the way to go!

moxie
April 20, 2012, 08:19 AM
Actually I'm referring to an original I acquired in Vietnam in 1972. It looked like the stock in post #20.

RCArms.com
April 20, 2012, 10:50 AM
Actually I'm referring to an original I acquired in Vietnam in 1972. It looked like the stock in post #20.
USGI M1A1 stocks are not known for being rigid when opened. They do not have a spring or detent that locks when open.

jason41987
April 20, 2012, 11:22 AM
what about .221 fireball?... would this fit in an M1 carbine action?... sure the muzzle energy is about the same between the two, but the fireball has much higher velocity, and bullets with much better drag coefficiencies meaning it would be much more powerful downrange as the .30 carbine bleeds its speed off in the first 100 yards

.303
April 20, 2012, 12:05 PM
USGI M1A1 stocks are not known for being rigid when opened. They do not have a spring or detent that locks when open.
ahh, I see. my folder doesn't "lock" per se, but it has a detent. perhaps AO improved their M1A1 stocks?

In any case, the Choate stock *does* lock open, and locks up solidly. for a modern folder, it can't be beat, especially for the price.

.45Guy
April 20, 2012, 12:28 PM
I've always had a hankering to try out a Universal Ferret in .256 Winchester. Too bad prices are insanely high...

moxie
April 20, 2012, 01:35 PM
.303,
The Choate stock is totally different from the .30 Carbine issued folding stock made of bent steel rod and a leather patch. Totally different. Go to post #20 and look.

USSR
April 20, 2012, 03:00 PM
moxie,

The M1A1 stock you were issued was at least 25 to 30 years old, and no doubt on it's last legs. The Italian made commercial ones seem to be holding up quite well.

Don

.303
April 20, 2012, 03:15 PM
.303,
The Choate stock is totally different from the .30 Carbine issued folding stock made of bent steel rod and a leather patch. Totally different. Go to post #20 and look.
Yes, they are totally different beasts, which is why I made a distinction between them :)

Auto Ordinance makes a phenomenal walnut and steel m1a1 repro stock.

Choate makes a great composite/metal folder, that also locks open.

This is my AO carbine

Little Wolf
April 20, 2012, 05:27 PM
If I knew of a source of converting the carbine to take .357 mag, I would of had it done yesterday. The rifle should have been chambered in that round to begin with.

I have heard, but not seen, of a couple people converting the rifle to take 10 mm.

RCArms.com
April 20, 2012, 06:10 PM
If I knew of a source of converting the carbine to take .357 mag, I would of had it done yesterday. The rifle should have been chambered in that round to begin with.

I have heard, but not seen, of a couple people converting the rifle to take 10 mm.
Not sure what you would be gaining with a .357 Magnum conversion that the Original .30 Carbine lacks. If there was a minor performance gain with the longer barrel, there woule likely be a trade off in reliability as the .357 Magnum rimmed cartridge that introduces a few difficulties to the verticle feed.

Would be interesteing to see the ballistics on that one though.

Don

.45Guy
April 20, 2012, 08:19 PM
.35 WSL would be interesting... Seems close enough to be a simple affair.
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g27/aguy123/Scan0002.jpg

Mickey Rat
June 5, 2012, 11:22 PM
I have always loved the 30 Carbine. I now have one in 5.7 Johnson and 256 Win Mag. There was supposed to be a 357 version out there, but I've never seen or heard of one.

Any 357 conversion would be dificult. The 256 Ferret (256 Win Mag) is a 357 necked down to 25 and magazines do not exsist. You have to make your own and it is a pain.

The 5.7 Johnson is easy to make, just lube 30 Carbine cases and run them in the resizing die. No trimming or neck thinning required. The case was designed to me made this way with no thinning of the neck required. Reloads are easy to make and quite accurate. A much better set up than the Ruger Mini 14. Standard Carbine mags work great.

I also have Marlin 61's in 30 Carbine & 256 Win Mag. Great rifles.

Dr.Rob
June 6, 2012, 02:34 AM
http://securityarms.com/20010315/galleryfiles/2800/2803.htm

This thing struck me as interesting. Not something I'd do to a Rock-Ola, but defintely an attempt to modernize that really we haven't heard much about in the past few years.

4v50 Gary
June 6, 2012, 08:51 AM
The Spitfire is the only conversion I would make.

351 WINCHESTER
June 6, 2012, 10:15 PM
I don't have a carbine, but I'm thinking the .351 Winchester is what the .30 carbine should have been.

Texan Scott
June 6, 2012, 10:25 PM
I've seen old promo stuff from a now-defunct company (can'tremember name) thatconverted m1s to 10mm auto, which didn't seem like a bad idea. As i recall, it wasn't a HUGE difference in the light end, but for 180-grainers it seemed really good.... wish someone would build one from scratch, maybe matte stainless over fixed polymer. sounds like a job for Ruger?

Nuclear
June 7, 2012, 05:11 AM
I'm thinking that if the lightweight bullets that are being developed for the 300 Blackout are compatible with the cartridges and feeding mechanisms of the M1 Carbine, they will make a world of difference in the long range ballistics and terminal effectiveness.

303tom
June 7, 2012, 11:27 AM
I load .30 carbine that will put .357 mag. to shame

desidog
June 7, 2012, 11:35 AM
At current rates, you're into a Mini14 or Mini30 for less than messing with an M1 and destroying it's resale and collector's value. The Mini is very similar in size, controls etc.

USSR
June 7, 2012, 01:09 PM
I load .30 carbine that will put .357 mag. to shame


What do you fire it in? No way that round's gonna fit in a M1 Carbine mag.

Don

kanook
June 7, 2012, 03:53 PM
I load .30 carbine that will put .357 mag. to shame
Did you make that one. I've got one and have never seen another till now.

unlimited4x4
June 7, 2012, 06:56 PM
I searched a while ago for a .357 conversion and came across a video from the Philippines supposedly showing a converted rifle. The video is still up, search on you tube for .357 M1 and it should be the first to pop up. The group is called Rauwolf Armaments. Not much on them, but it does appear they did do it. Search Facebook for Rauwolf Nadala Pamaran to find the FB page of the owner. The R. Armament stuff is mixed in with the personal stuff on his page. Does alot of "pimping out" of weapons when you see his work on the FB page. If in fact these guys did do this, I don't think they realize the possible gold mine they have.

303tom
June 7, 2012, 11:55 PM
What do you fire it in? No way that round's gonna fit in a M1 Carbine mag.

Don

NO, but these do.......

303tom
June 13, 2012, 10:05 AM
I love reloading.............166166

166167





These right here will even make the .300 AAC stand up & take notice, I shoot them in my .308 Handi-rifle with an adapter..............

sempai9
September 17, 2012, 04:36 PM
I just picked up a $500 Inland M1 carbine with IBM barrel from a shop and bought some boxes of ammo, went to the range, loaded the 5 round mag. Decided to unload the chambered round and run a bore snake with CLP first. The cartridge did not eject and after shaking the gun around it dropped out of the chamber. So I held the cartridge to the muzzle and found that it would easily get lost there too! A guy next to me in the lane suggested it might be a .38 size hole. He pulled out a .38 SPL, it chambered fine, extracted fine, looked good at the muzzle too. Thinking I might have a .357 chamber, I dared to touch off that 38 cartridge and it hit my 50 yard target. I suspect that some old timer had this rechambered, but no markings on the gun that I can find anywhere. The empty did not auto eject. The .357 cartridges do not like to feed into the chamber with out helping them get their noses pointed straight each time. I have not fired it again. I heard that PO Ackley did some M1 carbines reworked into .357 mag. I wonder if anyone has one of those.

bigfatdave
September 17, 2012, 08:18 PM
I just picked up a $500 Inland M1 carbine with IBM barrel from a shop and bought some boxes of ammoyou need to go back to that shop and have a talk with them

grendelbane
September 17, 2012, 08:46 PM
The M1 carbine has been chambered for cartridges that are simply insane. I remember one that was a .50 caliber. There was one that was a shortened .308, called the .30 Kurtz. A similar cartridge was made by necking up to .357".

Now, the big kickers tend to break stocks, bolt lugs, and who knows what else. That is not the gun's fault, though.

Like others, I would be reluctant to rechamber a GI, and reluctant to risk money on a clone. The 5.7 mm Spitfire looks like a cute package, though. There was on on a shelf at a gun store for several months that tempted me.

In the end, the JHP .30 carbine is pretty effective. If I were going to consider my Saginaw Steering for serious purposes, I would use that load.

Remember, when Maj. George C. Nonte and others were converting these carbines, they were widely available and relatively cheap. No wonder people use the AR15 platform for so many conversions today.

Vaarok
September 18, 2012, 03:15 AM
I bought one of the .44 Magnum Vulcans last year out of novelty as much as anything, but I'll be damned if I can find a use for it. Neat gun, works fine, fun, but I traded off my GI IBM for a Schofield revolver, sold the Irwin Pedersen I found to a collector for big bucks, and the Vulcan is probably going within the month in the hopes I can cash in on deer season rather than sell an oddball at a loss.

unlimited4x4
September 18, 2012, 08:45 AM
I know there is always the ballistics argument of .357 vs .30, to me they are close enough to be the same. I think the draw of a .357 conversion is the availability and price of .357/.38 vs .30. I'd love a .357 semi auto. The nextbest thing is a ruger pc4 in .40 cal. Small and lightweight like the M1, and SW 40 is still a good round. I really wish ruger would make them again.

Trung Si
September 18, 2012, 09:56 AM
My Question is, who would want to Butcher a perfectly Good M1 Carbine?:cuss:

USSR
September 18, 2012, 10:18 AM
I know there is always the ballistics argument of .357 vs .30, to me they are close enough to be the same.

Yep! One ain't gonna kill something that the other won't just as well.

My Question is, who would want to Butcher a perfectly Good M1 Carbine?

Agree.

Don

jimmyraythomason
September 18, 2012, 10:22 AM
My Question is, who would want to Butcher a perfectly Good M1 Carbine? face it,MOST M1 carbines are mixmasters. May are in less than perfect condition not to mention all of the commercial copies out there. A good,milspec M1 is a treasure but not all qualify. I have a General Motors milspec that will never be touched but would have NO compuction about converting a lesser example(if I so desired). Having said that,I think the little carbine and it's cartridge are a perfect match for each other.

sempai9
September 18, 2012, 01:25 PM
Ok, I called the place where I bought the carbine and they were not aware that it was not original .30 cal. I asked them to locate the previous owner and get information about the gun and conversion. Last night I played around with it testing to see if it was a rimless .357 style, using a .223 shell case but it truly is a .357 rimmed, as best as I can tell. The bolt face is opened up for the rimmed case too. I can't imagine some other wildcat that would fit with the muzzle diameter and the .357 case fitting the way it does, and .... it did shoot the one .38 SPL fairly accurately for me not aiming precisely at the bulls eye. It was 3" high from center at 50 yards. All things are pointing to this being a .357 carbine. That is kind of cool, but there are the feeding issues. you have to rack it 1-1/2 times to line up the cartridge. That is not cool. I don't know if anyone has worked out the feeding issues with these. I would have been content with the .30 carbine cartridge as it is close enough in performance to .357, and I am not afraid to reload for anything. I am even converting .223 cases into 7.62x25 for my PPSH-41, so straight walled cartridges are no big deal.

USSR
September 18, 2012, 02:32 PM
Didn't the bore diameter tip you off that it was not the original .30 caliber?

Don

Snowdog
September 18, 2012, 06:03 PM
Though the .30 Carbine round isn't exactly a powerhouse by rifle standards, I honestly think most woefully underestimate its potential. That slender straight-wall cartridge allows for 15 and 30 round magazine which are compact by comparison (to the AK, et al).

I believe if most detractors take the old Warbaby out to plink water-filled jugs, metal containers and the like, they might leave with a new respect for this particular carbine. The paper ballistics are lousy and somewhat deceiving; it does a number on things within 200 yards.

unlimited4x4
September 18, 2012, 08:29 PM
Some of you more knowledgable in the M1 history may have read this, but it was new to me and a good read for those of wanting to know about the conversion history of this rifle.

http://www.thegunzone.com/carbine-wildcat.html

Mac Attack
September 18, 2012, 08:45 PM
I have a Quality Hardware receiver that I picked up for cheap and would consider trying a .357 conversion. I don't have a problem with.30 carbine but is and not easy to find at your local Walmart like .38 special or .357. I already have 2 carbines so this would be a nice change pace.

BBQLS1
September 19, 2012, 09:05 AM
Not sure what you would be gaining with a .357 Magnum conversion that the Original .30 Carbine lacks. If there was a minor performance gain with the longer barrel, there woule likely be a trade off in reliability as the .357 Magnum rimmed cartridge that introduces a few difficulties to the verticle feed.

Would be interesteing to see the ballistics on that one though.

Don

.357 Mag ammo is easier to find.

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