Some tips to make this go smoothly?


PDA






Sobel
April 26, 2012, 09:31 PM
So my aunt from Ny is here in Orlando and after her and my mother have made their plans of seeing dolphins and all the other touristy things. But!!! After some difficulty I have gotten them to agree to a range trip. My aunt apparently has her hunter safety course ( Idk what that entails ) but, hasn't fired a weapon ever or since her childhood. Gramps used to be the sheriff. Anyways were going to the range and I'm wondering how to make this experience neither traumatizing or a giant argument. Plus having at least one family member who isn't terrified of guns would be nice.:banghead:

If you enjoyed reading about "Some tips to make this go smoothly?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Jorg Nysgerrig
April 26, 2012, 09:32 PM
Guns in .22LR are your friends.

holdencm9
April 26, 2012, 09:35 PM
And doubling up on ear protection.

allaroundhunter
April 26, 2012, 09:38 PM
What are you taking to the range (gunwise)?

holdencm9
April 26, 2012, 09:44 PM
I should clarify, doubling up on ears is good for handguns at INDOOR ranges. At outdoor ranges maybe not so much. Also for rifles/shotguns the muffs can get in the way, i think plugs are better. Some people have issues finding a proper cheek weld, or looking through one eye and finding the sight picture. Muffs can just be one more source of frustration.

Sobel
April 26, 2012, 10:13 PM
Well :( I sold my guns a week before I knew she was coming so we are renting from the shop I was thinking keeping it in the handgun section simply because they seem at least to me easier to shoot. And the Rifle range is very small and indoor. I was thinking of either a heavier handgun so that she can't feel as much recoil but then its heavier and I don't know if she'll like that either .

mnrivrat
April 27, 2012, 12:30 AM
Guns in .22LR are your friends.

+ 1

k-frame
April 27, 2012, 12:46 AM
Proper clothing, such as a hat and nothing that would allow hot brass to go where it wouldn't be welcome; that includes bare toes poking out of sandals.

Steel Horse Rider
April 27, 2012, 01:03 AM
+1 on the .22LR. A longer barreled version would probably make it more enjoyable too. Browning Buckmark, Ruger MkII, or perhaps a 6" revolver of some type. If you decide on the semi-auto's be sure to point out that A LOW GRIP BY THE ASSISTING HAND ALLOWS YOU TO KEEP THE SKIN ON THE TOP OF YOUR THUMB!!! Blood on the hand is not something to keep them enthusiastic the first time out.

writerinmo
April 27, 2012, 01:17 AM
What in the heck were you thinking??? Selling guns??? I don't think that's allowed unless it was to fund buying bigger better guns...

Sobel
April 27, 2012, 04:47 AM
What in the heck were you thinking??? Selling guns??? I don't think that's allowed unless it was to fund buying bigger better guns...
haha it was to fund a new handgun that i will be getting next friday , I sold my surplus guns so i can finally have a nib gun im excited. If this trip was planned 2 weeks from now i'd be set.

ultradoc
April 27, 2012, 08:11 AM
Get a Cricket! Now I bet they would get a chuckle from that.

writerinmo
April 27, 2012, 12:35 PM
OK, as long as you buy a gun with the proceeds! lol...

Yeah, the Cricket would probably go over very well for a first timer, actually. That or a good old Marlin 60.

My wife was new to shooting a few years ago. I bought her a Rough Rider .22 single action revolver to start with, then a Phoenix Arms HP22a to start getting her familiarized with the semi-autos. As soon as she fully recovers from her recent surgery (had two discs removed out of her neck and fused) hopefully her arm strength returns so that I can step her up to my Ruger P95.

rcmodel
April 27, 2012, 01:03 PM
handgun section simply because they seem at least to me easier to shoot.No handgun is easier to hit things with than any rifle.

If the objective is to make noise, use the handguns.

If the objective is to use an easier gun to learn to shoot accurately with, use the rifles.

rc

Sobel
April 27, 2012, 01:48 PM
No handgun is easier to hit things with than any rifle.

If the objective is to make noise, use the handguns.

If the objective is to use an easier gun to learn to shoot accurately with, use the rifles.

rc
Good point i suppose, tho imo handguns are easier to use but thats just me. I don't think my aunt will be shooting anytime soon after this. I just want it to be an enjoyable experience. Idk if shes all too interested in hitting anything haha.

Sobel
April 27, 2012, 01:51 PM
OK, as long as you buy a gun with the proceeds! lol...

Yeah, the Cricket would probably go over very well for a first timer, actually. That or a good old Marlin 60.

My wife was new to shooting a few years ago. I bought her a Rough Rider .22 single action revolver to start with, then a Phoenix Arms HP22a to start getting her familiarized with the semi-autos. As soon as she fully recovers from her recent surgery (had two discs removed out of her neck and fused) hopefully her arm strength returns so that I can step her up to my Ruger P95.
I hope she recovers quickly. You have a ruger p95?! Why thats the gun I sold my old cz-82 and m/n for the price of munitions were getting quite bothersome. Is it +p rated?Dare I ask +P+? I think if I gave her a 22 she would either enjoy it tons as its super easy to shoot or hate it because she feels it isn't a big gun or something of that nature.

M.Weier
April 27, 2012, 05:31 PM
Guns in .22LR are your friends.

^^+2

BCRider
April 27, 2012, 10:17 PM
If the range you're going to has both rifles as well as handguns then try asking what she may have shot. The very fact that she has a course related to hunting at all may just indicate that she knows more than you think.

So keep flexible and talk to both of them on the way to the range. Don't try to talk them INTO anything though. Ask what your aunt may have shot and when. If it turns out that she has some experience then build on that. If she's not actually shot much or hasn't shot since she was a little girl then start slow with something like .22 rifle and work up to something a little bigger. Same with the handguns. Start with a .22 and work up to something like a 9mm or more if they are comfy with the experience.

The point is to listen to them and let their concerns and experience be your guide on how to proceed. Do NOT try to be the guy that makes up their minds for them. There's simply no point at this time in deciding you'll start with any particular firearm since you don't know what she may or may not have shot before.

Sobel
April 27, 2012, 11:40 PM
If the range you're going to has both rifles as well as handguns then try asking what she may have shot. The very fact that she has a course related to hunting at all may just indicate that she knows more than you think.

So keep flexible and talk to both of them on the way to the range. Don't try to talk them INTO anything though. Ask what your aunt may have shot and when. If it turns out that she has some experience then build on that. If she's not actually shot much or hasn't shot since she was a little girl then start slow with something like .22 rifle and work up to something a little bigger. Same with the handguns. Start with a .22 and work up to something like a 9mm or more if they are comfy with the experience.

The point is to listen to them and let their concerns and experience be your guide on how to proceed. Do NOT try to be the guy that makes up their minds for them. There's simply no point at this time in deciding you'll start with any particular firearm since you don't know what she may or may not have shot before.
That sounds like some pretty good advice. I'll have to talk to her on Monday shes going to do a bunch of stuff with ma.

exavid
April 28, 2012, 02:34 AM
A 4 or 6 inch .38spl revolver would be a good gun for the purpose. Plenty of bang, little recoil and a nice 'big gun' feel. Add to that the brass doesn't go anywhere, no risk of fishing in a bra for a hot piece of metal. The option of DA or SA makes it interesting to shoot too. My wife much prefers revolvers because she says it's uncomplicated. Also doesn't like racking the slides on any of my pistols.

Ramone
April 28, 2012, 11:53 AM
9mm Carbine.

Low recoil.
Cheap Ammo.
Far easier to shoot accurately.
Centerfire is a little more 'real gun' than a .22.
Much safer (as in muzzle awareness).

Craig_VA
April 28, 2012, 12:11 PM
Guns in .22LR are your friends. +1

Centerfire is a little more 'real gun' than a .22. -1

9mm Carbine. ... Much safer (as in muzzle awareness). -1/+1

Introducing or re-introducing people to shooting, help them learn form and fun before they also have to deal with recoil. My .22's are just as much real guns as my 1911 .45ACP!

I will agree that a carbine is a good idea for first timers. Yes, long gun does enhance muzzle awareness. Start out with prone position or seated with table and support, not standing.

Even with handguns, seated with support is anice way to get started.

For the ladies, assuming there will be semi-automatic guns used, close, high neck shirt or blouse, preferably turtle neck or mock turtle neck is an important aspect. Open, gapping, necklines look nice at the dance club, but seem to be a magnetic basket for hot brass. Talk about ruining the fun!

If you have the time and the shop a has the guns available, I'd start with a bolt action .22LR rifle, move to a .22Lr revolver, like a s Single Six, then finish off with a .22 semi-auto pistol.

An advantage of a bolt action rifle and a single action revolver is that the process forces a slower shot to shot change. This will increase accuracy and focus.

lobo9er
April 28, 2012, 12:18 PM
Quote:
handgun section simply because they seem at least to me easier to shoot.

No handgun is easier to hit things with than any rifle.

If the objective is to make noise, use the handguns.

If the objective is to use an easier gun to learn to shoot accurately with, use the rifles.

rc
+1.

DammitBoy
April 28, 2012, 12:25 PM
Guns in .22LR are your friends.

+11

Do not start out with a larger caliber handgun!

Mike J
April 28, 2012, 12:47 PM
I agree with what has already been posted. I think a .22 rifle would be a great place to start.

As far as the P95 it will handle any factory loaded ammunition according to the owners manual. You can actually download the owners manual at Rugers website if you would like to read it before you get your pistol.

BemidjiDweller
April 28, 2012, 01:13 PM
Sobel- I have a P95 as well, you are going to love it. It'll eat anything you feed it, shoot it accurately, and it won't jam up on ya. Just make sure you aren't limp wristing and you will have a blast. Also check with CDNN every now and then, they had used P95 mags on sale for $9.99 a few times in January, they might run that again.

Sobel
April 28, 2012, 01:27 PM
I'm getting rather excited. ( both for my new gun and this range trip ) For time's sake we will probably rent a single gun which means I'll have go without trying the p95. Which is kinda disappointing but, I suppose any shooting is better than no shooting. I'm wondering what they have to rent. anyone been to the new Shoot straight in Casselberry Fl?

hso
April 28, 2012, 01:37 PM
Is she at all interested in doing this? If not, find something else to do with her that she'll enjoy.

If she is looking forward to it, stick with the advice given and let her pick what she wants to shoot from the rental case. She may want to spray a few rounds with a full auto or plink with a .22 or envision herself as Dirty Harry. The point is that this should be her trip to have fun and not your trip to make some sort of point.

Titusdrake
April 28, 2012, 05:37 PM
If they dont want to go to the range why force it upon them? Let em do what they want to do

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

theautobahn
April 28, 2012, 11:50 PM
+1 for a .22.

I always start new shooters out on a .22 rifle. It builds confidence in them, allows them the excitement of hitting something, and if they do something dumb (like turning toward you with the gun in their hands), it's easier to catch them than with a handgun. Once they're comfortable with the rifle, we move to handguns (which is where the big smiles appear).

For a new shooter to handguns, a revolver is definitely the way to go as a lot of new shooters get confused by "all the buttons" on an auto (as an aside - at a gun show today - heard one guy talking to his buddy about how safe a 1911 is - "look at all the safeties [as he points to them] - grip safety, lever safety [thumb] and a trigger safety [as he points to the mag release]).

12gaugeTim
April 29, 2012, 09:56 AM
If you're going to go the handgun route, keep in mind it's a lot easier to accidentally muzzle people with something that short compared to a rifle.

grasssnake
April 29, 2012, 10:07 AM
Rifle is safer too. Easier to keep pointed down range. Newbies tend to turn around to ask you something and have the pistol pointed at your midsection. They are less likely to do this with a rifle.

denton
April 29, 2012, 01:45 PM
I start them with a Ruger Single Six, with 22LR. Then I switch cylinders and let them shoot 22WMR. I'm sure that a bolt action 22 rifle would be equally effective.

It doesn't take long, usually only a dozen rounds, and they are ready to try something bigger.

Our next step is usually my wife's 3" 38 with Cowboy Action rounds. They tend to really like that.

Most new shooters seem to want to learn on handguns.

If they want to start with a rifle, and you're only going to have one available, then it's hard to beat the 10-22.

bobbo
April 29, 2012, 02:28 PM
If you want to make a YouTube video of her getting hit in the face, then a .44 Magnum or bigger handgun, or a 12 gauge with 3 1/2" shells and only a pistol grip, are the way to go.

If you want them to have fun and possibly want to do it again, then a scoped Ruger 10/22 (or insert favorite semi or bolt .22LR repeater here). More accurate than a pistol, safer to use (harder to swing it around to ask a question, etc.), and can be a lot of fun to dump a mag at 25m or 50m into some swinging targets. Scope it as they're older and more likely to have problems seeing iron sights.

Besides, you mean to tell us you have no reason to own a 10/22? That's almost like saying you don't have a reason to own a computer or a refrigerator.

Sobel
April 29, 2012, 11:08 PM
If you want to make a YouTube video of her getting hit in the face, then a .44 Magnum or bigger handgun, or a 12 gauge with 3 1/2" shells and only a pistol grip, are the way to go.

If you want them to have fun and possibly want to do it again, then a scoped Ruger 10/22 (or insert favorite semi or bolt .22LR repeater here). More accurate than a pistol, safer to use (harder to swing it around to ask a question, etc.), and can be a lot of fun to dump a mag at 25m or 50m into some swinging targets. Scope it as they're older and more likely to have problems seeing iron sights.

Besides, you mean to tell us you have no reason to own a 10/22? That's almost like saying you don't have a reason to own a computer or a refrigerator.
I just don't have the money to buy firearms I can't use for multiple things I'm in Orlando so I can't walk outside and hunt squirrels or plink. I'd rather have a handgun I can use for home defense and eventually carry.

shuvelrider
April 30, 2012, 09:51 AM
As mentioned by other's above, why did you see it as so important to work in this range trip. Did your Aunt or Mom bring it up, if so, then great. If not, then hopefully you will do everything possible to make it a positive experience for them, right down to buying lunch or dinner for them.
A rented firearm, hope it runs well and no issue's (frustration factor). Something that you are familiar with too.

rugerman
April 30, 2012, 06:36 PM
If the range allows it shoot reactive targets, anything that moves or breaks. Clay targets, tennis ball, whatever. My kids favorite was drink cans filled with water and 22 stingers.

Skribs
April 30, 2012, 06:45 PM
You know, everyone that I've started off on my .40 has loved shooting, or at least enjoyed it.

The one person I started off on a .22 didn't like it. I didn't start on a .22, and if I had, I probably wouldn't have enjoyed shooting either.

Sobel
April 30, 2012, 07:33 PM
We ended up not going. My aunt is not the most agreeable person and honestly I felt it would be unsafe to have someone with a personality like her's didn't belong behind any sort of weapon be it a bb gun , water pistol , or cotton balls. So We went to the Holocaust museum instead. It was really interesting and sad to see what my father's ancestors had to go through.

If you enjoyed reading about "Some tips to make this go smoothly?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!