.357 mag R-P cases


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Furncliff
April 27, 2012, 12:24 AM
I had some problems with the thin wall R-P .45acp cases. I have segregated the R-P 357 cases I'm about to load, should I expect to have the same problems with bullets (Horn 158 XTP) sliding back?

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GJgo
April 27, 2012, 12:27 AM
I don't think you'll have as much of a problem since the 357, 44 etc. have a pretty firm crimp in the groove. I sure don't go out of my way to get or use RP cases, though.

R.W.Dale
April 27, 2012, 12:35 AM
It just depends. I couldn't use Remington cases when I was loading some .356" cast bullets I was aiming to get rid of.

But a tighter set of dies may have a different result

joneb
April 27, 2012, 12:35 AM
In a revolver the thing to watch for is bullet jump, not bullet set back.
I have not had any trouble with R-P brass with Hornady XTPs, but I trim my cases to 1.280" and apply a heavy and consistent roll crimp.
I really like R-P cases for .358" diameter lead bullets.

Furncliff
April 27, 2012, 12:36 AM
Thanks. Hadn't thought about the crimp groove. These cases came to me as part of batch of cases I bought on line. I'm shooting these from a Marlin 1894c, I don't own a 357 handgun.

R.W.Dale
April 27, 2012, 12:41 AM
While a crimp serves a valuable purpose it is NOT a replacement for adequate neck tension.

If you can push the bullets in by hand prior to crimping the only thing crimping will accomplish is make your results even more unpredictable. ESPECIALLY in a tube fed levergun.

Hondo 60
April 27, 2012, 01:46 AM
In reloading 7.62x25 Tokarev, I've found that RP brass is OK.
But Remington bullets are very easily set back.

Exact same setup using Berry's 110gr 30 caliber bullets yields excellent results.

joneb
April 27, 2012, 02:13 AM
I'm shooting these from a Marlin 1894c,
I would consider this,
http://www.corbins.com/hct-1.htm

ArchAngelCD
April 27, 2012, 02:43 AM
I load a lot of Remington .357 Magnum brass and I have loaded XTP bullets in them. I have had no problems at all with that combination or any other bullet in the Remington .357 brass.

Walkalong
April 27, 2012, 08:21 AM
The ability to successfully use thin brass, and RP often is, is determined by how tight your sizer is, assuming your expander is not too large.

JLDickmon
April 27, 2012, 08:39 AM
I was surprised when I just went and checked, but the XTP's I have are .357 diameter (I could have sworn they were .358), so yeah, I'd be checking the expander ball on your die..

might have to take some sandpaper and polish the diameter down a little..

ReloaderFred
April 27, 2012, 01:46 PM
I load a lot of Remington .357 Magnum brass with both cast and jacketed bullets. I have no problem with them at all.

Hope this helps.

Fred

icanthitabarn
April 27, 2012, 02:20 PM
I bought used cases from a gunstore, all R+P. Imagine my horror after reading on net about these :what: They were 100% of my .357 cases. ;) I had no problems, besides the occasional split case. To be accurate, I had no idea how to crimp,but our new Mod. Walk got my mind right. Congrats on your Moderazation

moxie
April 27, 2012, 04:22 PM
Never any problems with them, or any other headstamp.

gamestalker
April 27, 2012, 04:42 PM
I too load oodles of RP .357 brass for decades and have never had tension issues. I would make sure you aren't over belling the mouths and make sure the die and expander are in spec..
RP

joneb
April 28, 2012, 01:03 AM
I was surprised when I just went and checked, but the XTP's I have are .357 diameter (I could have sworn they were .358),
The Hornady .357xtp fp and hp that have are .357", the Hornady 44 cal xtp are all .430".

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