Did they overreact?


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EvilGenius
April 29, 2012, 10:11 PM
My gf is a level 4 comissioned security officer for a local security company. She's one of the "watch commanders" that basically drives around to the different locations and makes sure everyone is doing what they're supposed to and respond to any situations.

Today she had stopped by a location and one of their personnel was fiddling with his car which apparently was giving him trouble on the way to work. They joked around a bit and one of the other personnel (also a level 4) decided to draw his pistol and aim it at the car's engine (and close enough to the guy under the hood to say that it was essentially aimed at him as well) with finger on trigger and made a joke about "I know how to fix this." She immediately jumped on him to holster his weapon, which he did begrudgingly. They had a few awkward moments then she decided to take him to his next post in the security car and then let him know in no uncertain terms that he'd better not ever unholster his weapon again without a good reason and if he does in her presence it'd be hard pressed for her not to arrest him on the spot (shes also a deputy constable). He came back some bs about he was in the military before this job, etc. She decided to let it go at the moment and reported it to the ops manager on the way to her next site. The ops manager decided to call the guy in off post to the main office where they both dressed him down and she wrote him up. He again tried to argue about how stupid this was because in the military they wouldnt care to which she responded that they dont care about his military experience. He is no longer a military member and therefore a civilian and bound by civilian laws. He responded with a big ole "Well F*ck you!" to everyone in the office on his way out then proceeded to text everyone else he knew in the company about what theyre trying to do to him. Word is from the big wig he's being sacked tomorrow due to his conduct.

I think he definitely got himself fired with the last bit, but did they overreact at first?

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Twmaster
April 29, 2012, 10:16 PM
IMHO, no. Nobody overreacted. The guy was acting like a tool and put that dude under the hood of the car in danger.

Hope he finds job hunting fun.

TurtlePhish
April 29, 2012, 10:16 PM
I don't think they overreacted. Safety should be number one, and if he's being unsafe with a gun it's reason enough to give him a good talking to.

highlander 5
April 29, 2012, 10:16 PM
Guy got what he deserved. Such stunts gets someone shot or property destroyed.

Calhoun
April 29, 2012, 10:18 PM
...but did they overreact at first?

Simple answer, no.

...with finger on trigger and made a joke...
Here's why not.

Inebriated
April 29, 2012, 10:18 PM
No... Not one bit... he's a civilian, and in most any circumstances, pulling your gun out is brandishing, let alone the fact that it's completely unsafe to point your gun, finger-on-trigger, at another human being.

Had he apologized and took his yelling-at humbly, they probably wouldn't have cared enough to fire him.

fallout mike
April 29, 2012, 10:21 PM
+1 to highlander

Sig Bill
April 29, 2012, 10:25 PM
Talk about a stupid stunt. Good riddance, you don't need dolts like him around.

ApacheCoTodd
April 29, 2012, 10:28 PM
If those are the facts - the bro's gotta go! I would say having this as documented as possible is in order as well. He certainly sounds like a possible CNN update at some time in his future.

Redlg155
April 29, 2012, 10:33 PM
It doesn't matter. Civilian, security officer, contract employee or sworn officer, you never remove your weapon from the holster without a valid reason. Sworn officers have a little more discretion when performing a high risk stop or entering a potentially deadly situation, however, pointing a weapon when deadly force is not justified can cost you your job and certification.

MachIVshooter
April 29, 2012, 10:35 PM
There certainly was an overreaction, but it was the idiot who thought he was being funny. Sounds like it would have been a non-issue if he'd just reholstered the weapon and apologized for the judgement lapse. But he took it to a whole 'nother level, and that cost him his job. And that's a good thing, IMO. Don't need a loose screw with a short fuse like him as an armed security guard.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
April 29, 2012, 10:36 PM
In my opinion, your girlfriend didn't over react, in fact, I think she UNDER reacted. Had it been me, I would have relieved him of his firearm and his job right there on the spot! Keep your bugger hooker off the damn bang switch PERIOD!! Joking around is all well and fine, until a live firearm is unholstered. I am assuming of course that it was a live firearm considering carrying around an unloaded firearm on a security job would be a bit pointless. Call me a hardass or whatever, but I think she went a little soft on the fella until he became insulting. So the hell what if the moron was in the military before hand. That action right there just proves the point that just because you were in Law enforcement or Military doesn't make you safer to carry a damn firearm. His actions were unsafe a flat out stupid.

N003k
April 29, 2012, 10:48 PM
I'm an unarmed guard in CT, and my company is international. They have VERY clear use of force policies, in this job they make things pretty clear where the company stands.

I'm sure an armed company is just as clear, and I get a distinct feeling that the policy makes it clear in no uncertain terms that a sidearm is not to leave the holster unless life is threatened.

Policy aside, it was just frankly a stupid thing to do. We all know the four rules, from what you wrote he broke all of them. He knew the gun was loaded, but didn't treat it as such. He pointed it at something he didn't actually want to shoot. He had his finger on the trigger. And he either willfully wasn't aware of what was beyond the target, or didn't care. It was a small distance from a guard with a bullet in them. He screwed up big, and then on top of it didn't own up to it. Sounds like he more than deserves to be fired.

Sergei Mosin
April 29, 2012, 10:50 PM
If someone does something unsafe, it is necessary to correct the behavior. The more serious the safety violation, the more serious and immediate the response. Committing a safety violation of this nature - placing another person's life in danger - merits the most serious and immediate response.

If I were in charge, my inclination would have been to terminate his employment for drawing his weapon and placing another person's life in danger. It would have taken some serious apologizing coupled with him having a clear understanding of how negligent he had been in order for him to keep his job. IOW, he would have to explain why I shouldn't fire his sorry posterior, and it had better be a good explanation.

He appears not to have understood the implications of his actions, which is my book is enough to terminate him, and his unprofessional behavior after the incident only serves to confirm the decision.

SabbathWolf
April 29, 2012, 10:53 PM
I would have let it go "one" time with a severe warning.
I may also have made him attend some remedial weapons handling training too, and pulled him from the schedule until completed.

If he had just taken the rear end chewing like a man, then the situation would not have been as bad.

I agree though, once he blew his top over it, then that changes things.
It demonstrates a low level of maturity already on top of the initial immature act itself; as well as the lack of ability to keep his emotions in check.
None of those things are a good fit in a person hired to be professional, as well as armed.

EvilGenius
April 29, 2012, 11:00 PM
Good to see we're all on the same side.

In my opinion, your girlfriend didn't over react, in fact, I think she UNDER reacted. Had it been me, I would have relieved him of his firearm and his job right there on the spot! Keep your bugger hooker off the damn bang switch PERIOD!! Joking around is all well and fine, until a live firearm is unholstered. I am assuming of course that it was a live firearm considering carrying around an unloaded firearm on a security job would be a bit pointless. Call me a hardass or whatever, but I think she went a little soft on the fella until he became insulting. So the hell what if the moron was in the military before hand. That action right there just proves the point that just because you were in Law enforcement or Military doesn't make you safer to carry a damn firearm. His actions were unsafe a flat out stupid.

We agree, but she doesnt have the authority to fire on the spot like that, only with the OK from the ops manager who'd be handling the termination paperwork anyways.

She decided it would only escalate the situation to try and disarm him then and there after he'd already reholstered the weapon upon orders. And she being the only other armed person there at the time figured it'd be too risky if he got extra uppity about it, which it sounds like a possibility.

zxcvbob
April 29, 2012, 11:19 PM
Just to stir things up (cuz that's what I do)

He's being fired for blowing up back at the office, not for drawing his weapon and recklessly endangering the mechanic with it? Implies that the bosses' feelings are more important that the lives of the lowly workers.

They might want to rethink this, even though the outcome is the same.

BCCL
April 29, 2012, 11:22 PM
He again tried to argue about how stupid this was because in the military they wouldnt care

Picture him doing the same thing in the motor pool on a military base........if he thinks nobody would have cared, he is delusional, or lying about ever having been in the military........

Guy sounds like a complete loose cannon.

EvilGenius
April 29, 2012, 11:27 PM
Just to stir things up (cuz that's what I do)

He's being fired for blowing up back at the office, not for drawing his weapon and recklessly endangering the mechanic with it? Implies that the bosses' feelings are more important that the lives of the lowly workers.

They might want to rethink this, even though the outcome is the same.

Well at the very least he was being written up, they had yet to decide if any further action was going to be needed until he made it for them before the meeting was over.

SabbathWolf
April 29, 2012, 11:28 PM
Just to stir things up (cuz that's what I do)

He's being fired for blowing up back at the office, not for drawing his weapon and recklessly endangering the mechanic with it? Implies that the bosses' feelings are more important that the lives of the lowly workers.

They might want to rethink this, even though the outcome is the same.

Without actually knowing this guy, it's tough to say I think.
I mean, people do dumb stuff.
Since the military was brought up in this thread, just as an example....
If a Private does something stupid with a weapon, you don't just throw him out of the service immediately.
But corrective training is a MUST.

Maybe the boss felt the guy did deserve a second chance and would have given him one...if...he hadn't just made matters worse instead by acting like a clown?

I'm not defending the initial act of stupidity at all.
So don't get me wrong here.

I'm just saying that "sometimes" a person can be salvaged, and actually become an outstanding employee if granted a "single" second chance to redeem themselves.
Ya just never know.

This guy however...just blew it completely.
I would have fired him too at that point.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
April 30, 2012, 12:01 AM
Sabboth, I am a firm believer in second chances as many of my employees can attest. But acts such as that as well as his attitude and comments, AT THE SCENE, not at the office would have led to his immediate dismissal by me. The second he opened his mouth to me after doing something so unbelievably stupid would have ended any and all chances. Had he manned up and apologized right there on the spot I MAY have rethought the incident and allowed him to make up for the stupidity. But he chose to be a smartass and act like breaking a SERIOUS rule in firearm safety was "no big deal" and that would have gotten him an immediate pink slip from me and quite possibly a foot in the rear.

We agree, but she doesnt have the authority to fire on the spot like that, only with the OK from the ops manager who'd be handling the termination paperwork anyways.

She decided it would only escalate the situation to try and disarm him then and there after he'd already reholstered the weapon upon orders. And she being the only other armed person there at the time figured it'd be too risky if he got extra uppity about it, which it sounds like a possibility.
__________________

In that case EvilGenius, I 100% agree whole heartedly in how she handled the situation. I was under the impression she was indeed tasked with the authority if relieving him immediately. Being that she wasn't, she did fine. The guy was a grade A, number 1, complete, and total moron and got what he deserved. Cudo's to the wife!!

Lost Sheep
April 30, 2012, 12:11 AM
In any branch of the U.S. Military such an act would have gotten him an Article 15 or Captain's Mast darned quick. Not only for the horseplay with a gun but for the repeated insubordination. And it wouldn't matter if it was in-theater or not. Of course, the military may have changed since I got out, but I doubt it could change THAT much.

SabbathWolf said it well. People in a position of authority or charged with enforcing rules MUST have good judgement, and doubly so if armed.

Lost Sheep

coalman
April 30, 2012, 12:19 AM
No. Guns are not toys and pointing a loaded gun is never a joke IMO. However, for some, I think it's a hard transition from active military to a comparatively mundane civilian life.

SabbathWolf
April 30, 2012, 12:22 AM
Sabboth, I am a firm believer in second chances as many of my employees can attest. But acts such as that as well as his attitude and comments, AT THE SCENE, not at the office would have led to his immediate dismissal by me. The second he opened his mouth to me after doing something so unbelievably stupid would have ended any and all chances. Had he manned up and apologized right there on the spot I MAY have rethought the incident and allowed him to make up for the stupidity. But he chose to be a smartass and act like breaking a SERIOUS rule in firearm safety was "no big deal" and that would have gotten him an immediate pink slip from me and quite possibly a foot in the rear.





Yes. You're correct.
That's what I said too I think.
The guy's mouth and attitude got him fired.
I agree with you.
He had it coming for certain.

I said I could have forgiven the "initial" act of dumbness, and subjected him to some additional training while also pulling him off the clock.
But once he went all mouthy and stupid too...then it's over.
Agreed.
I think we are actually saying pretty close to the same thing maybe.

Lost Sheep
April 30, 2012, 12:36 AM
Just to stir things up (cuz that's what I do)

He's being fired for blowing up back at the office, not for drawing his weapon and recklessly endangering the mechanic with it? Implies that the bosses' feelings are more important that the lives of the lowly workers.

They might want to rethink this, even though the outcome is the same.
I would phrase it differently.

He was corrected at the scene for mishandling his firearm.

He was reprimanded for resisting the correction, perhaps at the scene or in the transport to his next duty post.

He (in my opinion) made it worse with his "I am ex-military and know better than you (my employer) what I am entitled and authorized to do with deadly force that belongs to and is indemnified by my employer." attitude. This might have been curable with counseling depending on his (now dubious) mental state.

He was fired (again, my opinion, as my best guess) for his public display of disrespect, insolence and insubordination towards the company, which is sufficient in most places to defend against a claim of improper termination.

We only have one side of the story here, so be cautious about the conclusions to which we jump. All mine (but the last one) are depend on other facts or assertions being in harmony with the OP. But I don't see how publicly disrespecting my company is in any way acceptable.

Lost Sheep

denton
April 30, 2012, 12:46 AM
Well, I certainly wouldn't let a guy like that work on my car.

SabbathWolf
April 30, 2012, 12:57 AM
Well, I certainly wouldn't let a guy like that work on my car.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v648/Swampdragon/smilies/8504adca.gif

Wapato
April 30, 2012, 01:13 AM
I'm in general agreement with anybody here.

My two cents is that moving forward the company might want to make sure its policies are clarified and maybe go over it an extra time with military guys.

I don't know how things are in the military, but it's a lot of young guys and those rifles aren't holstered. I would not be shocked to find that in the course of going through the day they casually sweep each other somewhat regularly, and especially if things get hot I imagine the four rules get broken plenty. I wouldn't be shocked to find out that what he did would be acceptable in some locations.

Bad habits are hard to break.

On a side note, when my dad was in the army as an MP they didn't let the MPs have a round chambered in their pistol. Though that was in a time of drafts and his description of firearm training for the Army MPs made it sound pretty abysmal.

gun addict
April 30, 2012, 01:17 AM
no, no no and absolutely no. In the Marines even if i have my rifle on my back and i bent over/flag someone on accident i'd expect to be chewed out immediately by my peers or my NCOs, and if the line is hot there is absolutely no way such behaviors would be condoned.

My judgement call? This guy is a poser/mentally unstable individual

SabbathWolf
April 30, 2012, 01:39 AM
no, no no and absolutely no. In the Marines even if i have my rifle on my back and i bent over/flag someone on accident i'd expect to be chewed out immediately by my peers or my NCOs, and if the line is hot there is absolutely no way such behaviors would be condoned.

My judgement call? This guy is a poser/mentally unstable individual

As a former NCO...I agree with you.
I'd have been on you like disease on a Bangkok hooker for sweeping another soldier with your weapon.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
April 30, 2012, 02:10 AM
no, no no and absolutely no. In the Marines even if i have my rifle on my back and i bent over/flag someone on accident i'd expect to be chewed out immediately by my peers or my NCOs, and if the line is hot there is absolutely no way such behaviors would be condoned.

My judgement call? This guy is a poser/mentally unstable individual



You would have had to get my boot surgically removed from your butt!!!


On a side note, when my dad was in the army as an MP they didn't let the MPs have a round chambered in their pistol. Though that was in a time of drafts and his description of firearm training for the Army MPs made it sound pretty abysmal.

Never heard that one before. My old man was in during Korea and always told me he carried the same as he did at home. Condition 2 (magazine loaded, chamber hot, hammer down)

Salmoneye
April 30, 2012, 06:05 AM
Guy pulls gun on car, and you ask if your GF overreacted?

Davek1977
April 30, 2012, 06:30 AM
I honor and respect our veterans greatly. They have put themselves in a position to make a sacrifice not all of us are willing to make. That said, I am disgusted when one use's their prior military service as an excuse for poor behavior. The fact this guy repeatedly tossed around the fact he was ex-military as an excuse for careless, thoughtless, and downright unsafe gun handling and his reaction to being dressed down both speak volumes as to this man's character, and the sooner the company is rid of him the better off it will be

shuvelrider
April 30, 2012, 06:38 AM
Sounds like you doubt your GF actions, why even ask that here--------it's common sense that should tell anyone what a dumb-ass that man was, with his actions. I'm an E-7/SFC on deployment at the moment, his actions are not indicative of anything in this army concerning weapons.
She should have used her nightstick on him and knocked that weapon away , then proceed to beat the stupid out of him. Saying and proving he was a veteran is one thing, acting like a poser asshat is another.

j1
April 30, 2012, 07:52 AM
They tried to curtail a dangerous situation and he resisted at every step of the way. They tried to fix a stupid and dangerous act, he just kept the situation escalating at every step of the way. They did the only thing he would let them do.

WSM MAGNUM
April 30, 2012, 08:02 AM
No. I do`nt think his bosses overreacted. He overreacted with the wrong attitude that got him deeper in hot water. If he gets canned, it will be his own fault.

x_wrench
April 30, 2012, 08:11 AM
no, they did not over react. have you ever seen what a bullet does when it strikes something solid like an engine block? :what: basically, everyone in a 10 foot radius was at risk of serious injury or death if he had pulled the trigger, accidentally or not. he could have gotten the same point across by making the same basic gestures using his hands, without drawing his weapon. :banghead::cuss: he needed to go.

HOOfan_1
April 30, 2012, 08:22 AM
Sounds to me like they are cutting out a cancer. That guy doesn't have the attitude to be trusted with a jo requiring a gun.

He recklessly drew his sidearm.
He obviously has attitude and behavioral issues.
They are lucky they caught him before he actually harmed an innocent person with his cavalier and overbearing attitude.

The guy completely dug his own grave by cussing out his superiors.

EvilGenius
April 30, 2012, 09:39 AM
Guy pulls gun on car, and you ask if your GF overreacted?

Sounds like you doubt your GF actions, why even ask that here--------it's common sense that should tell anyone what a dumb-ass that man was, with his actions. I'm an E-7/SFC on deployment at the moment, his actions are not indicative of anything in this army concerning weapons.
She should have used her nightstick on him and knocked that weapon away , then proceed to beat the stupid out of him. Saying and proving he was a veteran is one thing, acting like a poser asshat is another.

Didnt mean to sound like I doubt her actions. I just was throwing this up as a food for thought kind of thing and disnt want to taint it by giving my full opinion outright.

I agree with her actions completely and the opinions of you guys. I think she handled it fine. The only part she second guesses about is wether she shouldve sent him home instead of to the second location, but her company just got taken over and nobody is really sure who can do what and when quite yet so it might not have been an option and I think if she had theres a possibility he could still be working there.

EvilGenius
April 30, 2012, 09:52 AM
She should have used her nightstick on him and knocked that weapon away , then proceed to beat the stupid out of him.
Heh, I agree.

She has an asp, but they wont let them carry them.

303tom
April 30, 2012, 10:35 AM
Nope; He got what he deserved & I would keep a eye on him..............

crracer_712
April 30, 2012, 10:42 AM
Nope; He got what he deserved & I would keep a eye on him..............


Yep, I would too. You never know when someone is going to go off, and by his reaction to the whole thing, he seems like a guy that's ripe for going off.

Drail
April 30, 2012, 10:44 AM
I have to wonder if he actually acted that stupidly while in the military and how THEY dealt with him. (or if he really served at all) When I wore the uniform if someone did anything that stupid the consequences would be very severe and the individual would usually end up being shipped to some installation that you never heard of for the rest of their enlistment. Stupidity on this level deserves a BIG smackdown. I have worked with individuals like this guy and it made me sick to be around them. The scary part is that most of these guys truly believe that what they did is no big deal.

Double Naught Spy
April 30, 2012, 10:45 AM
Given the description of events, termination seems to be the appropriate choice.

blarby
April 30, 2012, 10:51 AM
Not at all.

She, and they, did they 100% right thing.

Manson
April 30, 2012, 10:55 AM
Sounds like you have your answer. Guns are not toys. I hope he doesn't mention "I like to play with guns'. during his next job interview.

EddieNFL
April 30, 2012, 06:39 PM
Talk about night and day attitudes.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=656739

Erik M
April 30, 2012, 07:20 PM
I will reassure the person that drew his sidearm, the military would care, and had he done that on post in front of a duty sergeant he would have been 'talked to' about it.

zxcvbob
April 30, 2012, 08:06 PM
"I'm afraid expulsion is the only answer. It is the opinion of the entire staff that Dexter is criminally insane..."

mgkdrgn
April 30, 2012, 10:29 PM
Nope.

Horseplay with guns leads to dead people. Just because he was "in the military" doesn't give him a pass on that.

SabbathWolf
May 1, 2012, 12:57 AM
Nope.

Horseplay with guns leads to dead people. Just because he was "in the military" doesn't give him a pass on that.

What "branch" of the military anyways?

Lex Luthier
May 1, 2012, 07:47 AM
Mentally unstable people like that should be kept on a short leash. He was just waiting to channel his inner John Wayne, and should have never been allowed to carry a weapon professionally. A pro does not screw around like that.

WyoShooter1
May 1, 2012, 11:36 AM
... The ops manager decided to call the guy in off post to the main office where they both dressed him down and she wrote him up. He again tried to argue about how stupid this was because in the military they wouldnt care to which she responded that they dont care about his military experience... Word is from the big wig he's being sacked tomorrow due to his conduct...

So, how did it turn out? Was he fired or just given a good reaming out?

Ed

oldbear
May 1, 2012, 12:56 PM
Not in the least!

EvilGenius
May 1, 2012, 01:00 PM
So, how did it turn out? Was he fired or just given a good reaming out?

Ed
Well apparently right after he left he called whoever is above the ops manager to complain but got fired on the spot.

So not only did he dig his own grave, but he buried himself as well.

Sig Bill
May 1, 2012, 01:05 PM
LOL! Who is he kidding, the head honcho?

Fishslayer
May 3, 2012, 01:53 AM
I think he definitely got himself fired with the last bit, but did they overreact at first?

No. Correcting a lapse of judgement was pretty mild & levelheaded.

If he'd let it go at that & taken his medecine all would be fine. He brought the firing on himself.

Kinda wonder under what circumstances he left the military. Sounds like he has authority issues.

Hacker15E
May 3, 2012, 06:51 AM
Not sure what branch of "the military" he was in, but in my service that kind of joking-around-with-a-loaded-firearm act would be met with severe reprimand or worse.

Zach S
May 3, 2012, 07:30 AM
He's being fired for blowing up back at the office, not for drawing his weapon and recklessly endangering the mechanic with it? Implies that the bosses' feelings are more important that the lives of the lowly workers.No, he's being fired for his behavior after disciplinary action.

Years ago, if I screwed up I got grounded. When I argued, I got spanked. And if I kept on, I got the belt...

CZguy
May 3, 2012, 10:48 AM
Years ago, if I screwed up I got grounded. When I argued, I got spanked. And if I kept on, I got the belt...

And rightly so. You don't discipline to be mean, you do it to correct bad behavior.

If the individual accepts the punishment and learns from it, you're done. But if he explodes like the fellow in this thread, then your only choice is the fire him. His attitude determined the result.

EvilGenius
May 3, 2012, 03:44 PM
Apparently he was in the Army...

http://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/peepwall.gif

mdauben
May 3, 2012, 05:07 PM
Even if the other guy had not been under the hood when the idiot pointed his gun at the engine, it would have merited a dressing down. Guns are not toys, nor are they provided to joke around with. His subsequent reaction to his supervisor meerly proved he can't be trusted with a firearm.

Skribs
May 3, 2012, 05:19 PM
Because someone was in the military, they're supposed to earn our respect. However, if you're a toolbag, I don't care what your history is - you're still a toolbag.

Like was said in one of the earlier posts, there are three ways you can respond when management tells you you're in the wrong. 1) comply. They usually like this. 2) State your case logically, and then comply. 3) argue and lie.

#3 usually gets you in trouble

we are not amused
May 3, 2012, 06:08 PM
NO!


What he did could have, should have gotten him fired on the spot.

robmkivseries70
May 4, 2012, 09:17 AM
I am the only one in this room qualified to handle this Glock "foty" . . .:banghead:

Pilot
May 4, 2012, 09:45 AM
Not only was his action totally wrong, but his REACTION to the resulting reprimand tells me there is a dangerous attitude there. He is fortunate that he didn't have an ND and/or hurt somebody.

IlikeSA
May 4, 2012, 09:56 AM
How did that guy make supervisor in the first place? He needed to learn to follow, then be given the responsibility to lead.

EvilGenius
May 4, 2012, 10:30 AM
How did that guy make supervisor in the first place? He needed to learn to follow, then be given the responsibility to lead.
He wasnt a supervisor, just a level 4 security guard.

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