Surprised by Glock 30 accuracy


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1KPerDay
April 30, 2012, 11:36 AM
I have a Robar'ed G30 that I haven't shot a lot because I don't particularly like it... it has a goofy beavertail/shelf on it, and the trigger guard bugs me (glock knuckle, but not to the extent of my .40 glocks).

However, it does have the grip reduction, so it points "correctly" for me. I just ran a few mags through it yesterday and was pretty astounded at how accurate it was for me. The first 5 shots were winchester JHP, standing, and printed about 1.5 inches at 10 yards, standing. Three went through the same hole. Which is good by my standards.

Then I put a G21 mag full of my berry's plated reloads through it at 18 yards on steel plates, and didn't miss one. 9 inch round plates, standing. Then 3 more G21 mags of remington leadless, and I think I might have missed one shot. Firing pretty quickly. That's pretty good my my standards. I was actually amazed. It has the 3 dot night sights on it, which I hate, but I can't deny that I shoot it well.

Guess I should shoot it some more. :D

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Teachu2
April 30, 2012, 11:56 AM
The G30 was the first Glock that I shot well. I was impressed enough to buy one as my CCW. After 30+ years of 1911s and S&W revolvers, it took an exceptional polymer pistol to motivate me to change platforms. I was impressed enough to buy one for future CCW.

brigadier
April 30, 2012, 12:29 PM
I personally find the Glock very hard to get a good feel for. Can't stand the trigger or how it recoils.

It strikes me as a gun designed entirely by left-brain types, focusing entirely on sheer mechanics and paying very little to no attention to the abilities and limitations of the user.

One of those things that looks great on paper but in many ways self-defeating in action.

Mechanical accuracy of the Glock is actually very good (even though practical accuracy leaves a little to be desired) and reliability is very good. Safety is excellent in terms of sheer mechanics but the take-down seams like it was meant to trick the user in to shooting themselves in the hand, which that style of take-down is notorious for.

I am actually doing a study right now (for a documentary) about the causes of shooting accidents, geared to prove that very often they are not the result of carelessness but the result of the limitations of the human mind. Basically, that the human mind can only consciously handle a few tasks and if overloaded, some things are subconsciously (meaning, you don't notice you're doing it) handed over to muscle memory and the subconscious and shooting accidents often happen at that point. One of the things being addressed in the study (and eventual report) is that the Glock is practically tailor made to maximize the chance of a shooting accident under such conditions.

Anyway, it's a reliable and reasonably accurate gun so I can't say it's a bad gun. But outside of the 10mm Auto market, it's one of the last synthetic frame handguns I'd get.

1KPerDay
April 30, 2012, 01:09 PM
the take-down seams like it was meant to trick the user in to shooting themselves in the hand, which that style of take-down is notorious for.

I am actually doing a study right now (for a documentary) about the causes of shooting accidents, geared to prove that very often they are not the result of carelessness but the result of the limitations of the human mind. Basically, that the human mind can only consciously handle a few tasks and if overloaded, some things are subconsciously (meaning, you don't notice you're doing it) handed over to muscle memory and the subconscious and shooting accidents often happen at that point. One of the things being addressed in the study (and eventual report) is that the Glock is practically tailor made to maximize the chance of a shooting accident under such conditions.
Yeah... step 1: unload the gun. Step 2: triple check the chamber is empty and point it in a safe direction before pulling the trigger.

Put that in your documentary. :D

brigadier
April 30, 2012, 01:33 PM
I will, as well as the fact that most adult shooting accidents are caused by people like you, myself and the rest of our members who know and have those rules drilled in to them.

1KPerDay
April 30, 2012, 02:10 PM
Who either become lax or break one or more of the rules. :)

How about you start another thread? :cool:

Shoobee
April 30, 2012, 02:25 PM
Happy Valley, after you sight-in at 10 yards, then backup to 25 yards, and put a target up, and shoot 5 to 10 rounds, and photo it with your camera phone, and post it, so we can see it too.

10 yards does not tell you much.

25 yards is much more revealing.

and a picture is worth 1000 words.

Shoobee
April 30, 2012, 02:27 PM
Brigadeer, you are way ahead of me on this one. I am still just focused on the results on paper.

There are dozens of reasons why I would never get a glock of any kind.

But I am curious to see how a glock shoots by someone who is not already spoiled by a 1911A1.

But for that to make sense to me I need to see the 25 yard data.

:D

Shoobee
April 30, 2012, 02:32 PM
Shooting should be by the numbers. At least it has been since WW1 training for the 1903 Springfield.

That means it takes a good coach. Unfortunately most people being civilians learn on their own.

That's what causes accidents. Trial and error. Errors are inherent in the trial and error methodology. No way around it.

But like Happy Valley said, that is a different thread.

Teachu2
April 30, 2012, 02:57 PM
Mechanical accuracy of the Glock is actually very good (even though practical accuracy leaves a little to be desired) and reliability is very good. Safety is excellent in terms of sheer mechanics but the take-down seams like it was meant to trick the user in to shooting themselves in the hand, which that style of take-down is notorious for.

I am actually doing a study right now (for a documentary) about the causes of shooting accidents, geared to prove that very often they are not the result of carelessness but the result of the limitations of the human mind. Basically, that the human mind can only consciously handle a few tasks and if overloaded, some things are subconsciously (meaning, you don't notice you're doing it) handed over to muscle memory and the subconscious and shooting accidents often happen at that point. One of the things being addressed in the study (and eventual report) is that the Glock is practically tailor made to maximize the chance of a shooting accident under such conditions.


Nice to see that you're making a documentary to prove a fallacy - you've already drawn a conclusion, so now you're gearing a "study" to prove your point! Another graduate of the Karl Rove School of Journalism, I presume?

Idiots will be idiots, like the one that set the cruise control on the motor home and went in back to make a sandwich. They manage to kill themselves cleaning single-shot weapons, revolvers, hay balers, trash compactors, and just about everthing else known to man. The Glock is no more or less prone to such an event than any other semi-auto in existence.

M1key
April 30, 2012, 03:18 PM
^^^he must have drank the Dean Speir koolaid

For the record, I am not surprised at all with Glock accuracy. :cool:

M

kingkeoni
April 30, 2012, 03:23 PM
There is a reason that Flock enjoys the level of success they have achieved.

They make a quality product that is accurate and reliable.

Glock fans will say "Of course, it shot well"

And Glock haters will say "That's not that impressive"

1KPerDay
April 30, 2012, 03:52 PM
10 yards does not tell you much.

It tells ME enough. I have no interest in shooting paper at 25 yards. I don't shoot paper for fun. Shooting for me is recreation. I mainly shoot steel. In practice and in competition. I only shoot paper when working up loads. Which for ME is work.

Guess I made the mistake of starting a thread with "Glock" in the title. :D It was purely subjective. But it's not often I will go through 4 magazines in rapid succession and miss only one or two plates. It just surprised me is all.

jmr40
April 30, 2012, 03:59 PM
personally find the Glock very hard to get a good feel for. Can't stand the trigger or how it recoils.

It strikes me as a gun designed entirely by left-brain types, focusing entirely on sheer mechanics and paying very little to no attention to the abilities and limitations of the user.

One of those things that looks great on paper but in many ways self-defeating in action.



Over the last 25 years millions of people world wide have picked up a Glock and found it to be the most natural pointing, easiest to use, and accurate of all combat pistols.

I can understand if you like something else better. There are several guns I LIKE better, but none perform better. If I couldn't figure out how to shoot one, and do it very well, I sure wouldn't admit it in public.

Glocks are different, and lots of thought went into making the trigger and ergonomics as shooter friendly as possible. If you have been shooting something different it takes a little practice to learn how to shoot a Glock. Once mastered you begin to understand.

I'm not at all surprised at exceptional accuracy. People with no previous firearms experience almost always shoot Glocks better because they don't have to unlearn how to shoot. Same with those who put in the effort to master a new system. The only thing I've found to be more accurate are a few target grade 1911's, and not by enough to ever matter in a SD handgun.

amd6547
April 30, 2012, 07:43 PM
My fruitless search for a compact, out-of-the-box reliable Affordable 1911 for CCW is what led me to the Glock 30.
Deciding that the 45acp is what is important to me, not the platform, I read about the high regard the G30 is held in.
Rechecking what they sell for, I found one for sale near me from a private individual...with night sights, spare mags, and an excellent holster...for a great price.
Though I had given up on Glocks years ago after owning a G23 that I never shot well, I decided to buy the G30 and give it a try. I figured I could sell it for more than I bought it for if I didn't like it.
Well...I found I shot the G30 as well or better than my full sized semi custom 1911's.
It feeds anything I put in the mag, I like the option of using a 13rd mag, and 10 or 8 rds for CCW is great.
My club has 10" steel plates at 40yds, and hitting them with every shot is easy.
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h61/amd6547/DSC01873.jpg

girvin02
April 30, 2012, 09:06 PM
I own and love 1911's, including Colt & Kimber's. When I want to carry a .45, I grab my Glock 30, every time. They are very acurate firearms. And I find 10 +1 rounds of .45 ACP to be very reassuring.

coalman
May 1, 2012, 02:44 AM
The Glock 30 is a real keeper indeed.

thefamcnaj
May 1, 2012, 04:39 AM
I shoot my G30 as good or better as anything I have in my safe. The 30 is one of my favorite handguns, its a do it all gun for me. Ccw, bed side gun and fun at the range.
I once traded my g30 for an xdm, felt so bad I went back a week later and bought it again.

brigadier
May 1, 2012, 12:43 PM
How about you start another thread?

Good idea.

Manson
May 1, 2012, 01:08 PM
Another load of news to me. Or at least a load of some kind. I have never heard the Glock's were designed to shoot owners in the hand. Someone please link some verifiable facts to support this assertion.

It's a wonder I never heard of a law suit based on this apparent dangerous design.

OP If you or any one else shoots himself in the hand it is because they are doing it wrong. Oh and the gun was loaded. So given those circumstances you might shoot yourself in the hand. Yes the muzzle is the dangerous part.

Now before the thread jack you were commenting on your 30's accuracy. Glad to hear you shoot it well. I shoot mine pretty well also.

DoomGoober
May 1, 2012, 02:10 PM
It has the 3 dot night sights on it, which I hate

@1KPerDay -- Out of curiosity what part don't you like? The 3 dot part or the night sights? And what do you prefer instead?

1KPerDay
May 1, 2012, 04:22 PM
The 3-dot arrangement. I prefer either the SIG type (and some Beretta 92s) dot front, post rear, or a simple black rear and dot front. 3 dots slows everything down IME.

GLOOB
May 1, 2012, 09:56 PM
Basically, that the human mind can only consciously handle a few tasks and if overloaded, some things are subconsciously (meaning, you don't notice you're doing it) handed over to muscle memory and the subconscious
Couldn't agree more. But I come to the opposite conclusion. There are 3 things I want to be aware of at all times, when handling a handgun, and the position of the safety isn't one of them.

I dunno about the G30, but my G21SF is up there with my most accurate handguns. When it comes to sniping small things at long ranges, I'll bank on it over my 6" 686. To be sure, I'd take my friend's Gold Cup over it, but only for the sights.

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