WLRM, problem for 30-06?


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RPRNY
May 4, 2012, 12:21 PM
So I just loaded a test batch of 20 rounds 30-06 with the Hornady 150 gr SP over 46.5 gr H-Varget in Remington once fired brass and realized that I had used Win Large Rifle Magnum primers rather than plain Large Rifle. While I realize there is no benefit to using Magnum primers with this load and that there will be a pressure spike, the load is below Hodgdon start data at 47 gr Varget and well below their max at 51 gr Varget (50,000 psi). I will be using in an H&R Handi rifle. In your seasoned opinions, is this reasonably safe?

My H&R Handi carbine in 45 Colt reamed to 454 handles hot 454 rounds closing on 65,000 PSI, so I am comfortable about the rifle's ability to handle the extra pressure. I suppose if I have over pressure signs on the first couple of rounds, that says "stop".

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rcmodel
May 4, 2012, 12:29 PM
It's more then reasonably safe.

It's a nonexistent problem.

The only place where substituting a mag primer for a standard one would present pressure problems might be if you were already shooting a max load to start with.

Things like this is what the Starting load is designed to prevent.

rc

Haxby
May 4, 2012, 12:31 PM
If I was working up a 30/06 load with those components, I'd start a little hotter than that. Should be a mild load.

rcmodel
May 4, 2012, 12:34 PM
Yep!

IMO: Starting below a suggested starting load is way more likely to present safety problems then substituting primers.

rc

RPRNY
May 4, 2012, 02:09 PM
Thanks. Hornady had Varget loads below 46.5 in their 2011 book but when I pulled up 150 gr bullet weight on the Hodgdon on-line site, their two load range was 47 and 51. I have been told that rule of thumb is a Magnum vs Standard primer is equivalent to @ 2 additional grs of powder but wanted to verify that any spike wouldn't be above and beyond that.

NATE40
May 4, 2012, 04:39 PM
Many reloaders will use a hotter magnum primer in very cold conditions,like our wyoming winters, They use standard book loads just switch to magnum primers in winter and standard LR in summer.

Rapidrob
May 4, 2012, 06:37 PM
I was talking to the CCI rep a few months back and he informed me that the hottest primer made is the "Bench Rest" type primer. While extra care is used in the pellet weight, the burn rate is much hotter than "normal' primers. I've heard of no one getting into trouble using these primers which as as hot or hotter than the Magnum primer.
some of the Ball Powders need a magnum primer to get a really good burn going.
your load will not be a problem even on a hot day.

NCsmitty
May 4, 2012, 06:40 PM
I have been told that rule of thumb is a Magnum vs Standard primer is equivalent to @ 2 additional grs of powder

It's been my experience that the only rule of thumb, is that there is no rule of thumb when dealing with magnum primers and their effects on pressures. Different manufacturer's magnum primers may increase pressures with widely varying results.
Generally, a 5% drop in powder charge, when switching from standard primers to magnum, will offer more than enough safety margin when doing so, and then a work up to the level that you want to achieve.


NCsmitty

kingmt
May 4, 2012, 07:24 PM
I have never seen a difference in them. In handgun(9mm) I use to load way over max & even then seen no difference. Without looking at the data you are I can only guess what your seeing is data for 2 different bullets. One is probably brass & the other jacketed.

ArchAngelCD
May 5, 2012, 12:12 AM
The OP keeps saying he's afraid the pressure is going to spike. Magnum primers don't cause pressure spikes but improper powder charges can. Magnum primers will burn slightly longer and slightly hotter than standard primers. They will not blow up guns and are not atomic bombs. (It looks like marketing works!)

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