Handgun Safe for Nighstand


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Captains1911
May 8, 2012, 11:35 AM
I'm looking for a reasonably priced nightstand handgun safe for my girlfriend's house, because there are 4 children living there. Quick access is a must and it only needs to fit a Glock 19 with weapon light. I was almost set on a MiniVault until I read numerous negative reviews regarding poor battery life. The biometric safes are appealing except for the price. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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Skribs
May 8, 2012, 11:40 AM
Get the mini deluxe, it has a light inside and it has a power adapter so you dont use batteries unless the power is out or it isn't plugged in.

I have had the multi deluxe for 2 or 3 years now and never had to change batteries.

FAS1
May 8, 2012, 12:50 PM
Something with a push button mechanical lock? There are several brands and styles avail. with this type lock.

http://fas1safe.com/images/12421583724691669415992.jpeg

Skribs
May 8, 2012, 12:52 PM
I just wanted to add that I agree with you wholeheartedly that a quick-access safe is about the best compromise of accessibility and security in regards to a handgun with children present.

SSN Vet
May 8, 2012, 01:09 PM
I've had a gunvault (http://www.gunvault.com/)bolted to the heavy metal frame of my night stand for ~12 years....

I can roll out of bed and pop up armed in ~2 to three seconds.

I've since put one centrally located on the ground floor of the house near kitchen as well.

Both work flawlessly.

I change the batteries every other year or so.

I don't use the biometric lock model.

Cabellas has them on sale for ~ $80 every so often.

smalls
May 8, 2012, 01:09 PM
http://www.amazon.com/HOMAK-HS10036684-Electronic-Access-Pistol/dp/B0012OS4GK

I have the larger version of that safe. It's cheap, it works great, and you can bolt it down.

I put a small motion activated LED light I got from Walmart for like $5 in it so that I can see my pistol in the dark.

Batteries have lasted 6 months so far. Which reminds me, I should probably replace them this week.

Shadow 7D
May 8, 2012, 01:19 PM
Personally, I'd buy from FAS1
besides the fact that both the locksmiths that comment on most of the safe threads here and have posted some of their projects (like major bank vaults and similar) endorse it

I've have had 2 of the cheap Chinese locks crap out on bedside vaults and it's much better constructed than a gunvault, which you can pop with a kitchen knife (or screwdriver or dropping) if you know how.

sleepyone
May 8, 2012, 01:41 PM
The timing of this thread could not be more perfect. We are getting licensed to foster and adopt and we need a solution like this. Our two daughters are 15 and 17 and know how to handle firearms, so we don't worry about locking up our CCWs at home. I was reading some reviews about the Homak on Amazon, and there are several people who have said their code quit working, they could not override it and eventually had to destroy the box to retrieve their gun and damaged the thing to which the safe was mounted. Not good.

I like the GV 1000D minivault deluxe by GunVault, but even it has some issues with battery life and the one with the AC power supply does not power the lock. It just works the light and alarm from what I have read.

smalls
May 8, 2012, 02:31 PM
Hmm. I didn't read any reviews like that when I purchased mine.

I did have that happen with a combo lock gunvault (200 model, I think), though. The lock jammed, and I couldn't get in it. I had to pry it open with a screw driver. Bought it from opticsplanet, and they replaced it with the keyed model for free.

laguna0seca
May 8, 2012, 02:46 PM
I like the Speedvault. http://www.gunvault.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/p/speedvault-2.png

I would stay away from the Biometric ones, I have heard too many complaints about the reliability. And you need it to open every time on the first time.

laguna0seca
May 8, 2012, 02:48 PM
^^^Wow, that pic is enormous, sorry about that.^^^

smalls
May 8, 2012, 02:50 PM
Wow, that thing is sweet. I wish I would have came across it while looking for a nightstand safe.

denton
May 8, 2012, 02:54 PM
Alternate solution:

$60 safe, about the size of a microwave, at Harbor Freight. Holds guns and other stuff, including the bolts out of rifles you keep in the closet.

Open the door each night before you go to bed, and close it first thing in the morning. In daylight, it opens in 3 seconds flat.

Enter three wrong combinations, and it locks you out for 60 seconds. That makes it very slow going to get in without knowing the combination.

Some small gun safes have a very limited number of combinations, and most anyone with half a brain can guess their way in in under 15 minutes.

Skribs
May 8, 2012, 02:58 PM
I figure the purpose of a small safe is just to make it harder for someone to use against you while it is at your home. It would be too easy (even with it bolted down) for someone to take with them. If I wanted to prevent theft, I'd use a different solution.

allaroundhunter
May 8, 2012, 02:59 PM
I use a GunVault Microvault. It holds my M&P with a TLR-1s attached, a spare mag and a handheld flashlight. I can go from asleep to armed in under 5 seconds. It is great, and I have had no problems with the battery life.

I have heard too many problems with biometric safes to consider them.
http://img.tapatalk.com/a55b0bad-6ddb-512f.jpg
This was before I has the TLR-1s.

....I know, crappy cell phone pic....sorry :o

gbw
May 8, 2012, 03:08 PM
I'm very glad to see people are locking up their guns. It's idiotically irresponsible not to do so. Everyone should.

I use the compact from V-Line.

This fit my needs because
a) It lies flat in a drawer and opens from the top
b) Does not use batteries
c) Is as secure as any and very fast to open in no-light conditions with minimal practice

Disadvantages:
a) It's somewhat noisy

b) The locking mechanism reduces the available space inside severly. Mine can hold one decent sized pistol only. A Kel-Tec P32 can also fit, but nothing wider because the lock protrudes into the safe too far, it hits on the gun and it will not close.

c) MOST SERIOUS - there is no spring loading of the top. This safe can be CLOSED BUT UNLOCKED. This is not acceptable because it's easy to assume it's locked when it is not. I added a spring to mine that holds the lid open unless the lock is closed and locked. [N.B. Its still possible to punch in the combo and not open the lid, which also is a closed but not locked position. In this case the knob must be turned first. Still not great, but the spring is far better than nothing. Ideally the the lock should retract automatically after punching in the combo. But it doesn't and there isn't much to be done here.] This also makes it much faster and easier to open in the dark.

Overall, I'd recommend a V-Line if you need to put it in a bedside drawer. Be sure the drawer will open far enough to allow the lid to open fully. I'd probably get the larger model if it will fit fit in the drawer, and add the hold-open spring to the lid. I used a large spring from a cheap plastic spring clip.

smalls
May 8, 2012, 03:20 PM
I'm very glad to see people are locking up their guns. It's idiotically irresponsible not to do so. Everyone should

That's a pretty bold statement.

If I didn't have a child, my handgun would go straight from my hip to my night stand every night, and straight back to my hip every morning.

It's all personal opinion, but it seems like the OP is only locking his up at night while he visits his girlfriend, who has children. Otherwise, he wouldn't need one. If he did, he'd probably already have one.

Skribs
May 8, 2012, 03:25 PM
I'm very glad to see people are locking up their guns. It's idiotically irresponsible not to do so. Everyone should.

Whether or not it is responsible to do so depends on a lot of factors. I don't lock all my guns up unless my nephew is coming over, instead I have them hidden around the condo so I have quick access no matter where I am without spending $100+ per safe. It isn't very likely that a home invader would find them before I get to him, and if I'm not home I am not too concerned if they get stolen (they can get guns from other sources so I don't feel like a supplier, and I have homeowners insurance).

For the record, a great way to hide a gun in your entertainment area is to get a 3-pack DVD collection (I am using the X-men trilogy) and a block-type holster with a smaller gun (I'm using a Desantis Nemesis with the extra magazine pouch for my LCP), and put the gun on the shelf with the box over the gun. Granted, if they're stealing DVDs it is still a target they might find, but it keeps it hidden from view.

gbw
May 8, 2012, 03:37 PM
Whether or not it is responsible to do so depends on a lot of factors.

We disagree. It's a gun. If it's not on your person it should be locked up.

Hiding is not a safe option. If you cannot afford to keep them safely then don't keep them, the possible consequences are too severe to justify the risk. It doesn't take much looking to see far too many tragic examples.

Captains1911
May 8, 2012, 03:46 PM
That's a pretty bold statement.

If I didn't have a child, my handgun would go straight from my hip to my night stand every night, and straight back to my hip every morning.

It's all personal opinion, but it seems like the OP is only locking his up at night while he visits his girlfriend, who has children. Otherwise, he wouldn't need one. If he did, he'd probably already have one.

Exactly. I live alone, and when I'm there alone, my CCW is not locked up, it goes right on the nightstand (all my other guns are locked in the big safe). But since my gf lives with several children, and I spend a lot of time there, this won't work. Currently when I'm there, my CCW is either on me or locked in one those small car gun safes that requires a key to open, not quick access by any means. It's all about your situation.

I decided to go with this Stack-On safe, should be big enough for a night stand gun to be permanently stored along with my CCW, plus some. It probably won't fit in or on the nightstand, but should fit nicely under the bed. For $76 shipped it fit the bill, I wasn't wanting to spend more than $100. I also feel more comfortable with a 10-digit keypad making it MUCH more difficult to crack the combination versus the 4 or 5 button ones.
http://www.amazon.com/Stack-On-PS-508-Extra-Strong-Electronic/dp/B002ERVMJU/ref=pd_cp_hi_1

Skribs
May 8, 2012, 03:47 PM
There are a lot of people who lock their guns up who have had tragedies. Kids see the combination. Small safes are portable, and if you've seen the Jeff Foxworthy bit where he talks about the Portable Safe his wife bought him "the Portable Safe, so the burglar can take it back to his place and open it at his leisure." On the other hand, there are a lot of people who don't lock up their firearms who haven't had tragic accidents.

It's just like saying "if you don't have a safety, your gun could go off at any moment." Revolvers and most DAO pistols don't have manual safeties.

allaroundhunter
May 8, 2012, 06:38 PM
On the other hand, there are a lot of people who don't lock up their firearms who haven't had tragic accidents.

There are more tragic accidents that occur from firearms that were not locked up than with firearms that were.....

Now I am not going to lecture anyone on whether to lock their guns up or not, we don't know each other's living situations so it is not my job to pass judgement or advice unless I am directly asked to do so. I keep my guns locked up because while I trust my younger siblings with guns, I cannot trust my step-siblings with anything. I even have to lock up pocket knives......

Be safe, be responsible, and it will all go well.

Tom488
May 8, 2012, 06:56 PM
I would stay far away from the biometric safes. They have a habit of not working when you need them most. I had one for a while, and even after programming my fingerprint about a dozen times (to account for slight variations in finger placement), it was still only about 60% effective.

IMO, the best is a mechanical simplex lock, because they're almost never going to "not work". Gunvaults are decent as well, with their electronic combination locks. Battery life doesn't concern me, because you get alerted to a low battery condition well before they completely die.

I have this simplex-lock pistol safe, a V-Line Top Drawer Pistol safe, next to my bed:

http://www.personaldefensesolutions.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/VLineTopDraw.jpg

And a GunVault Deluxe out in my workshop.

denton
May 8, 2012, 11:24 PM
How you store your gun is a highly personal decision. I don't think there is just one right answer. If I were elderly and lived alone in a bad neighborhood, I might make a very different decision than I did.

I have grandkids in and out of the house very often, so I need something to keep curious little hands safe.

For a long time, I thought I could just hide my guns. Then I learned from a neighbor that one day he found his two year old out in the driveway with his 357 Magnum, trying to figure out how to get cartridges in it. The kid had found the "hidden" key, unlocked the drawer, taken out the revolver and ammo, and taken both out onto the driveway.

So now most of my guns are in a heavy duty steel cabinet in my workshop, and a few handguns are in a microwave size safe in my bedroom, within easy reach.

Jaybird78
May 8, 2012, 11:25 PM
I bought a Ft. Knox handgun safe for the closet. It has a mechanical lock and seems pretty stout.

I've had it for over a year and no problems so far.

Price was around $160 but that is cheap insurance because I have a little one at home also.

Skribs
May 8, 2012, 11:40 PM
For a long time, I thought I could just hide my guns. Then I learned from a neighbor that one day he found his two year old out in the driveway with his 357 Magnum, trying to figure out how to get cartridges in it. The kid had found the "hidden" key, unlocked the drawer, taken out the revolver and ammo, and taken both out onto the driveway.

They were locked (maybe easy to find the key, but still locked) and STILL a 2-year-old was able to figure it out.

GunnerShotz
May 9, 2012, 12:08 AM
My own 2 cents, for what it's worth, is to agree with "it depends on the situation". Situational awareness is Always the determining factor, isn't it? What's the risk that Your gun will be picked up by the wrong hands? It's a continuum at best, or "what's Your worst scenario?". Do you have small children? Do you live in a relatively 'safe' neighborhood with a low crime rate? Or...

I'd go with the 'best' solution you can afford to the 'worst' scenario you can envision for your situation ;)

303tom
May 10, 2012, 11:01 AM
How about we try a little Education...............I grew up with three younger siblings, firearms were always accessible but we did not play with them. I raised four boys & firearms have always been accessible & they never played with them, WHY ? Education...........

jrdolall
May 10, 2012, 11:13 AM
I have a pistol in my desk drawer in my office. I have one under my mattress in the BR. I have one in the console of my regular truck and my farm truck. My carry weapon is near me at all times either on the bedside table or beside me in the LR.

I have three kids with two still at home. They have been taught from infancy how to handle guns and everything about safety that I can teach. I do not have any of these guns in safe because they are there for SD and HD. When my kids were under 10 yrs old I did not have any guns besides my ccw that were not locked up. I had a small safe that I kept in the LR that was designed to keep the kids from being able to easily access the gun and my ccw was not available to them.

If you have guns at home then it is possible that kids or visiting adults can gain access no matter what precautions you take.

Skribs
May 10, 2012, 11:37 AM
Tom, I don't think that you can lump all kids together. Education works for some, locks are required for others. It also depends on how they are raised - these are not his kids, but his g/fs. Similarly, my sister wants to try to hide the fact that guns exist from her son, so it makes it hard for me to educate him to safely leave them alone if he comes over and finds one.

bhesler
May 10, 2012, 12:18 PM
I'm very glad to see people are locking up their guns. It's idiotically irresponsible not to do so. Everyone should.

I use the compact from V-Line.

This fit my needs because
a) It lies flat in a drawer and opens from the top
b) Does not use batteries
c) Is as secure as any and very fast to open in no-light conditions with minimal practice

Disadvantages:
a) It's somewhat noisy

b) The locking mechanism reduces the available space inside severly. Mine can hold one decent sized pistol only. A Kel-Tec P32 can also fit, but nothing wider because the lock protrudes into the safe too far, it hits on the gun and it will not close.

c) MOST SERIOUS - there is no spring loading of the top. This safe can be CLOSED BUT UNLOCKED. This is not acceptable because it's easy to assume it's locked when it is not. I added a spring to mine that holds the lid open unless the lock is closed and locked. [N.B. Its still possible to punch in the combo and not open the lid, which also is a closed but not locked position. In this case the knob must be turned first. Still not great, but the spring is far better than nothing. Ideally the the lock should retract automatically after punching in the combo. But it doesn't and there isn't much to be done here.] This also makes it much faster and easier to open in the dark.

Overall, I'd recommend a V-Line if you need to put it in a bedside drawer. Be sure the drawer will open far enough to allow the lid to open fully. I'd probably get the larger model if it will fit fit in the drawer, and add the hold-open spring to the lid. I used a large spring from a cheap plastic spring clip.

I agree on the V-Line and on its limitations. I went with the larger Top Draw version, because it fits perfectly in my nightstand drawer. I can fit a full frame Beretta and a Sig 380 if I arrange them around the lock mechanism. The drawer has to be fully open for the safe lid to stay open.

The only thing that I didn't like was the lack of a spring, which I have yet to add. I initially worried about securely mounting it, but with a home alarm, and living a few blocks away from the police station in a small town, I don't expect anyone to stick around very long after the alarm goes off.

Also, there are rarely children in the house, only when friends or family come by, and they are usually closely supervised.

Panzercat
May 10, 2012, 04:05 PM
Or if you're on a budget, you can get a fire chest (https://www.google.com/search?q=fire+safe#hl=en&sclient=psy-ab&q=fire+chest&oq=fire+chest&aq=f&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_l=serp.3..0l4.6577.8110.1.9055.6.6.0.0.0.0.205.708.2j3j1.6.0...0.0.89vDG-unEsw&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=ab407b5897f76374&biw=1280&bih=890). Water proof, reasonably fire proof and protects against most reasonable intrusion. Insert key, opens at the push of a single button. No, it's not perfect for everybody and every situation as noted over the last two pages, but it's an alternative.

hang fire
May 11, 2012, 12:36 AM
Wife and I have two gunsafes to keep our weapons under at night, they are called pillows.

Captains1911
May 11, 2012, 08:33 AM
Wife and I have two gunsafes to keep our weapons under at night, they are called pillows.
That's smart....

Hugo
May 11, 2012, 09:14 AM
Watch this video. It's by a locksmith/security expert who does security testing with a team. Just like in the movie Sneakers! Some "Nightstand" type gun lockboxes are horribly designed and are easy to pick open or just break open. In the video he tests several and presents this at a security conference.

Any police on this board please watch the video since it's pretty horrible how a burglar with a few brain cells can break into some of these with no evidence of forced entry. Biometric fingerprint safes are mostly pretty horrible at this. Insurance nightmare probably.

Warning: He does swear a little bit but just occasionally so watch this with headphones, not at work with speakers blaring the first time.

http://vimeo.com/31177302

And the speakers website. Deviant Ollam. www.deviating.net

Review your airline travel experience if you (legally of course) fly with a firearm here. Some airports and airlines are good, some nearly break the laws.
http://deviating.net/firearms/packing/accounts.html

Note: Vimeo is like youtube but the sound is always good and in sync and they don't have goofy or silly videos.

mcdonl
May 11, 2012, 09:21 AM
I have two teenage daughters, both are well versed in firearms, hunting and reloading. My guns are in my two gun cabinets in my den... My HD pistol is in my nightstand at night, and on me/in my car the rest of the time.

My kids have both taken hunter/firearm safety and are not going to sneak into my bedroom at night to play with my gun.

FAS1
May 11, 2012, 10:23 AM
Some "Nightstand" type gun lockboxes are horribly designed and are easy to pick open or just break open.

Most are only designed to keep your kids out and do an acceptable job of that. However, I personally would not have any electronics on a handgun safe. I wouldn't have anything with a tubular lock as well. A curious teenager can make a tubular lock pick for just a few bucks just to see if he can get in (I didn't always do what I was told as a teenager). All electronic operated ones will have some kind of keyed lock for when the mechanism or batteries fail. There are heavier safes out there and many use the mechanical push button lock and don't need a backup key. It is a s quick as anything out there, can be opened by feel in the dark and more reliable than most of the biometric and electronic ones. The heavier boxes when properly secured give a lot more protection for your HD gun than the cheaper ones designed to keep toddlers out.

denton
May 11, 2012, 04:49 PM
On the small electronic safes I'm familiar with, the batteries are accessible from the outside. I open my safe every night and close it every morning, and the batteries last a long time, like a year or more, IIRC.

I've always told my grandkids that they are welcome to come to me to ask to hold any firearm in either my big safe or my little one. They can dry fire them, work the bolt, or whatever. That way there is no mystery to be curious about.

RBid
May 11, 2012, 05:35 PM
"I've always told my grandkids that they are welcome to come to me to ask to hold any firearm in either my big safe or my little one. They can dry fire them, work the bolt, or whatever. That way there is no mystery to be curious about."

I wish more people understood this concept.

303tom
May 12, 2012, 08:03 AM
"I've always told my grandkids that they are welcome to come to me to ask to hold any firearm in either my big safe or my little one. They can dry fire them, work the bolt, or whatever. That way there is no mystery to be curious about."

I wish more people understood this concept.
Yeah Buddy..................

Hugo
May 12, 2012, 12:00 PM
"I've always told my grandkids that they are welcome to come to me to ask to hold any firearm in either my big safe or my little one. They can dry fire them, work the bolt, or whatever. That way there is no mystery to be curious about."

I wish more people understood this concept.

I so agree. Education is how you improve the world. Especially safety and familiarization training! Remember the mysterious stuff is attractive to kids. Take away the Mystery and it's not a big deal and the danger level goes way down.

PaulKersey3
May 12, 2012, 01:17 PM
About 18 years ago I saw an alarm clock bedside safe at a gun show. I looked just like a clunky 80s (this was 94) alarm clock. Guy showed the display model with digital, am/fm, snooze and a Glock 21. I recall him saying that even a crackhead won't steal an old alarm clock.
;)

Skribs
May 12, 2012, 02:00 PM
I wouldn't count on someone not stealing old equipment. In 2007, someone broke into my parents' house (I was living with them while going to college) and stole a bunch of things. Among them was a laptop that was too old to run Windows 95 properly.

jrdolall
May 12, 2012, 02:17 PM
Education is definitely the key to most of the world's problems. My 12 year old daughter can field strip and re-assemble most of my pistols unless the slide is too stiff for her to operate. If I hand my kids a gun I always make sure they see mee confieming that it is not loaded and then they will re-confirm that it is not loaded before they look it over.

KTXdm9
May 12, 2012, 02:37 PM
To the OP's question, I like my LockSafe biometric.

Pilot
May 14, 2012, 07:42 AM
I really take offense at people trying to tell me what to do with firearms in my own home. Whether it be how to store them, or how to keep them to keep me safe. Advice is one thing, but a few posts seemed a little over the top.

My guns, my home, my rules. Period. And yes I have gun safes, and use them, but I really would rather not be told I have to.

Hugo
May 14, 2012, 10:34 AM
At the end of this video, (NSFW again, some casual swearing since it's a casual conference full of guys, still good info) he does recommend one "nightstand" safe that would do well in a drawer. The LOCKSAF PBR-001 was the best one he tested in this video. Others were laughable/scary easy to pick or bypass in seconds.

http://vimeo.com/31177302

gbw
May 14, 2012, 11:28 AM
...My guns, my home, my rules. Period.

Wrong. Try loading your guns with explosive ammunition, for example. Or set up a meth lab in your garage. It won’t be your home, or your rules, or your anything else for long. We live in society and there are always limits, even in our homes.

No offence intended, it's good you’ve accepted the responsibility that goes with gun ownership, and have and use your safes.

I did say that it’s idiotically irresponsible to leave guns lying around unattended. It is.

No gray areas; no 'what about his' or 'I'm different because of that', or 'think about this other'. No spinning, no lawyering, no twisted logic. Leaving guns lying around is irresponsible and dangerous. Small safes aren't perfect and they won’t stop thieves and no one claims otherwise. But they will stop most children, and that's reason enough.

I’ll go further – if enough of us gun owners continue to insist on our ‘right’ leave guns lying around, it won’t be too long ‘til more laws are passed that do tell you what you have to do in your own home with your own guns. Or worse.

Why take the risk, no matter how small? Leaving guns lying around does not make you safer. If a gun is not under your direct control, lock it up. If it saves one kid it’s worth it.

TyGuy
May 14, 2012, 11:33 AM
I keep a 4 digit combo hard box under my bed with a Glock 21, extra mag, and a light in it. I got it at Walmart for $30. It's not going to stop a thief, but it should keep prying eyes away.

Skribs
May 14, 2012, 11:37 AM
GBW, he wasn't talking about breaking the law. He's talking about how there are different rules in every household. Take mine, for example. I don't have kids. The only kid in my life is my nephew who lives across the state, and when I see him it isn't at my condo. The only people who ever go in my condo are me, my friend (who is a safety-oriented shooter and knows where my guns are), and my parents (who are safety-oriented shooters). They are kept out of sight, but at least one gun in every room of the house.

I dont want to have to carry around my condo, and I frequently go back and forth to the different rooms, depending if I'm on the computer, watching TV, or getting stuff from the kitchen. Should someone break in, I want to have quick access to a weapon. If someone breaks in while I'm not there and steals them...well, I'm insured, and I don't feel like a supplier (if they want a gun, they'll get a gun, whether or not they steal mine). Even then, if I had it in a small safe (which I have in the bedroom), it wouldn't be too hard to steal it.

So no, I don't feel it's dangerous. Every gun that is "lying around" is hidden from sight and in a holster. If my nephew came over, I would lock them up.

See, I take your posts to mean that you think I'm irresponsible because I do not lock up my guns. But I've thought through the positives and negatives, and I really don't see it any more dangerous my way. I do see it as safer, to have quick access anywhere.

gbw
May 14, 2012, 12:04 PM
See, I take your posts to mean that you think I'm irresponsible because I do not lock up my guns.

To be clear: I do so think. There is no reason or excuse good enough for leaving guns unlocked and unattended (when you're not home). Too many ways, not forseeable, for things to go wrong and end tragically.

I'm done, I'll leave it there.

Skribs
May 14, 2012, 12:14 PM
I see it differently. I see two sides - on one hand, having a handgun readily available in any room of the house. On the other, having them locked up. I think I'm better off having them readily available.

I used to keep them locked up unless I was carrying, but then I started thinking about it. What happens if someone breaks in, and I'm not able to get to the bedroom? That could end in tragedy for me, being unable to defend myself. On the other hand, I could purchase a handgun safe for every room of the house, but that will start to ramp up the price, and I'm on a limited budget. I already have a place to lock them up if I feel I need to for company's sake.

I'm not making an excuse. I've thought it through and weighed the benefits. In your case, you determined they need to be locked up. I don't know what your situation is, but I am not at all going to argue with you that locking them up is a good idea. As I said above, I weighed the pros and cons, and I believe there are pros for locking up.

But you should also keep in mind, that some of those unforseeable ways in which things can end tragically involve not getting to the gun in time because it was locked up, as opposed to a tragedy caused by the gun because it wasn't locked up.

I'm reminded of the very long speech by the woman who was complaining about gun control laws to the lawmakers in court, and one of the things was that her gun was secured in her car instead of on her when someone opened fire in a restaraunt, and if she was carrying she could have stopped him instead of fleeing.

gym
May 14, 2012, 12:35 PM
If your gun is not on you, it is of little purpose unless your home invader team rings the bell, or otherwise alerts you before crashing through the door or window.
I have several friends who hide guns throughout their homes, but they have not been involved in a home invasion. Having been involved in one you should know that you only have time to draw and fire.
Having guns laying around is not a good idea. If you live alone it is ok, but won't really accomplish your desired result. I leave one gun for my wife when I leave, as she won't carry, so it goes in a spot that is just a shelf hidden by another shelf, "slim" so as not visible. Otherwise they all go in the safe except the one I am carrying. Sometimes I wonder if some of our members are single that have these ideas about leaving weapons all over the house. You are bound to have a mishap unless you just never have people over for dinner or guests who stay for a few days . Having 4 young grandkids,"under 9 yrs old" , doesn't allow for leaving loaded guns around. At bedtime your gun should be in a holster on the side of your bed. That's where it's going to do the most good. Unless you can get your gun in a second or less it's too long. Lock the bedroom door if you have little ones. That way you have 2 doors to enter and your alarm and dog should have woken you up by then. Use the "chime" feature on your alarm system, "they all have it in the last 20 years" so if a window opens you can hear it. I would not consider a safe for my go to gun, it is just one more step to overcome, before being able to defend yourself. Your heart and brain will be running so fast that even the simplest task becomes difficult. Last thing you need is a sticky lock.There is also a foil that we have mentioned before for the windows, I know 3m makes one. It makes it very hard to break them with a bat or pipe. It won't happen with one shot, if you are on the ground floor, you may want to look into it. I have a second gun most times on my person, so at night I have 2 guns available within arms length in the dark. Also a strobe flash with 250 lumens, and a jewelry box with assorted mags for every handgun caliber I may have at my disposal. That's what works for me, your milage may vary.

Skribs
May 14, 2012, 12:43 PM
Gym, I do love alone, and rarely have people over, except for a specific friend (who's like my brother) and he knows where everything is. They are hidden, they are in a holster (so it's not like I will accidentally grab the trigger if I go for it).

If someone does break in, I will not be right at the front door. I will have enough time at any point in the condo to grab one. If I locked them all up in the bedroom, then 80% of my waking hours, the front door would be between me and my firearms.

I am not of the mindset that if I cannot resolve the conflict instantly I will give up.

Pilot
May 15, 2012, 11:26 AM
Wrong. Try loading your guns with explosive ammunition, for example. Or set up a meth lab in your garage. It won’t be your home, or your rules, or your anything else for long. We live in society and there are always limits, even in our homes.

That is utter B.S. You have introduced a canard into the mix. The presumption or hypethetical of illegal activity. As long as I am NOT BREAKING THE LAW, there is no reason for law enforcement and/or other branch of government or individual like you telling me what I can do in my own home including how I keep my guns.

gbw
May 15, 2012, 01:38 PM
Wrong again. Those were just the easiest acts by which to make the point, and in any case were not excluded in the original sweeping statement.

But that's really not important. An act need not be illegal to be irresponsible, dangerous, or foolish. If enough of us continue to insist on some 'right' to leave guns lying around, which is irresponsible, dangerous, and foolish, it will result in tragedies and it will become illegal.

And now I really am done.

Pilot
May 15, 2012, 01:56 PM
You're "done" because you know you're wrong.

Skribs
May 15, 2012, 03:48 PM
The point, gbw, is we think we have the right because we do not agree that it is irresponsible, dangerous, and foolish. I think it is foolish to put all my eggs in one basket; that is - to lock my guns up in the safe I have, so that if I am not near the safe, I do not have them readily available. I also do not have that much funding to spend on a safe for every room in the house, so here's the compromise I have.

FAS1
May 15, 2012, 06:17 PM
The point, gbw, is we think we have the right because we do not agree that it is irresponsible, dangerous, and foolish. I think it is foolish to put all my eggs in one basket; that is - to lock my guns up in the safe I have, so that if I am not near the safe, I do not have them readily available. I also do not have that much funding to spend on a safe for every room in the house, so here's the compromise I have.

Wouldn't pocket carry around your home solve that? I always have a P3AT in my pocket even around the house. My kids are grown and gone so I certainly could leave guns in different rooms and I wouldn't have a concern about kids getting them. My concern would be more about a break in when not at home. There's not much a thief won't find. He could care less what he destroys while turning your place upside down.

thefish
May 15, 2012, 07:04 PM
to the OP's question,

I just got one of these from Walmart. $50. has a concealed key in case you forget the code or the batteries die, and you can turn the keypad beep on or off. Combo can be set from 3 to 8 numbers. According to the instructions, with normal use, the batteries should last a year. I can always use lithium for longer life, if I want. It has a low batt indecator.

Not sure if I'll mount it in the drawer in the closet or by the nightstand (ill have to put drawer slide extensions on the drawer because it does not open enough), but in either case, it will not only be secured to the drawer, but because the drawer bottoms are pretty flimsy, i'm going to get a bit of coated cable from the hardware store, and fasten it to the wall with that.

Keeping my 3 year old out is more of a concern than theft for me.

One thing to note is the depth. The lid will close with my 9mm, but not with the 9 in it's cheap redhead holster due to the added thickness of the clip.

This safe will also not auto lock, you have to turn the knob. I think this is standard for something that is not a true "safe".

I too looked at the Gunvault, and the thing I didn't like about the ones I've seen, is that they front load instead of top load. If it is in a drawer, it seems the angle to grab inside the safe would be akward.

Just my 2c, take it for what it's worth.

PS. I applaud you for doing the responsible thing and securing your firearm with children around.

thefish
May 15, 2012, 07:09 PM
@ Post 13

"Alternate solution:

$60 safe, about the size of a microwave, at Harbor Freight. Holds guns and other stuff, including the bolts out of rifles you keep in the closet."

I actually bought that one from Harbor freight, but returned it when I got it home and realized it wouldn't fit in the drawer. It's huge.

It also had a loud ratchet mechanism designed to hold the lid open, that I didn't like.

Skribs
May 15, 2012, 11:52 PM
I could pocket carry, FAS1, but I prefer not to have anything in my pockets while I'm at home.

Like I said, if I'm not home and a thief finds them...oh well. He could find it if it was in a safe, and most handgun safes are easy to take with them. If he wants a gun, he'll get a gun, whether or not he steals mine.

If I'm home, I know where they are, he doesn't. I can get to them a lot quicker than he can find them. They aren't out in the open.

weblance
May 16, 2012, 09:10 PM
I have the same as thefish in post #60. I got it from Amazon.com for $38. Its well made and will keep the kids out. Its not a gun safe. It wont stop a thief. It will slow down a child or teen. They are not easily pried open. They DO need to be bolted down to something large. They are best opened at night before bedtime, and closed first thing in the morning. Its the best, reasonally priced solution I could find, and for $40, may save someones life.

http://www.amazon.com/Stack-On-PDS-500-Drawer-Safe-Electronic/dp/B002KEIU4W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337216779&sr=8-1

skidder
May 18, 2012, 10:08 PM
I have the same as thefish in post #60. I got it from Amazon.com for $38. Its well made and will keep the kids out. Its not a gun safe. It wont stop a thief. It will slow down a child or teen. They are not easily pried open. They DO need to be bolted down to something large. They are best opened at night before bedtime, and closed first thing in the morning. Its the best, reasonally priced solution I could find, and for $40, may save someones life.

I keep mine unlocked at night also. My wife's sp101 and my Service Six.
I picked up this Winchester safe at Walmart for $48 and bolted it to the dresser (five foot dresser 1/16" metal plate underneath). The bolts underneath will not loosen without holding the bolt in the safe. They will have a hard time getting this safe out the door. I keep the guns loaded along with a speed loader. The reason for the safe was not my kids, but when the neighbor kids come over to visit. Quick access with 3 to 8 digit combo, and a key if you forget your combination. I would recommend this product to anybody that has a lot of curious kids around.

http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Safe/RugerSafe.jpg
http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Safe/WinSafe.jpg

303tom
May 19, 2012, 10:16 AM
Wrong again. Those were just the easiest acts by which to make the point, and in any case were not excluded in the original sweeping statement.

But that's really not important. An act need not be illegal to be irresponsible, dangerous, or foolish. If enough of us continue to insist on some 'right' to leave guns lying around, which is irresponsible, dangerous, and foolish, it will result in tragedies and it will become illegal.

And now I really am done.
You got to be a Democrat, Right ?

Hugo
May 20, 2012, 10:26 AM
Keep this on track folks. This is a discussion on what brand of lock-box or small safe are good and hard to pick or break into, and how some are less robust or downright defective designs. Some containers are good but the locks are junk, hoping you don't notice or do research. Research is the key in this important purchase.

This video shows a locksmith/security tester detailing some small lock-boxes, slightly NSFW since he does some casual swearing at a casual security conference. Still good info.
http://vimeo.com/31177302

This is not a discussion of whether you need a safe or not. If kids are visiting or moving in, you need something to lock up guns until they are old enough to learn firearm safety. It's also handy to delay burglars and increase the chance they get caught and arrested, or better make them look elsewhere and stop robbing you.

Argue semantics or flaws in logic in another thread or forum, please.

gym
May 22, 2012, 09:32 PM
Give a look, it's self explanitory.
http://backwoodshome.com/blogs/MassadAyoob/2012/05/22/hot-lead-versus-cold-blood/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MassadAyoob+%28Massad+Ayoob%29

jhco50
May 23, 2012, 03:18 AM
All these ideas are nice, but I just use a holster. I feel cheap now.

Paul7
May 23, 2012, 12:43 PM
How about a 1911 with safety on and none in the pipe, then you wouldn't need a safe. For pete's sake, do you lock up all your knives also?

LeonCarr
May 23, 2012, 12:52 PM
I have a V-Line just like the one in Post #23, and actually have it inside the top drawer of the nightstand. Works great.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

dom1104
May 23, 2012, 12:55 PM
I use a Ft. Knox Auto Pistol Box bolted to the bedframe.

Works great, no batterys, quick access.

http://www.gunsafeshouston.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FortKnox-AutoPistolBox.jpg

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