Suppressed shooting downrange POV video


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Ironman
May 9, 2012, 06:55 PM
I was asked to do this buy a guy that commented on one of my videos. Turned out ok. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cp3P2eF6Q74

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230RN
May 9, 2012, 07:11 PM
Complete silencer/suppressor neophyte here.

Very interesting video, well done.

I wasn't familiar with the "wet" versus "dry" silencers (or silencers at all).

What were you shooting into, and how much noise was there from the impact at 40 feet? I know shooting subsonic Aguila 60 gr subsonics out of a rifle is pretty quiet, but the impact on steel is fairly noisy. I also shot a CB cap at an abandoned RR bridge some distance away and there was just a click, and then a pretty good clank when it hit the steel plates of the bridge.

Sorry if this sounds very naive, but as I pointed out, "I know nothing."

Terry, 230RN

Ironman
May 9, 2012, 07:41 PM
Darn, I knew I forgot to show something. Im shooting at a small berm made of mixed dirt/sand/rubber mulch about 45ft away.

TurtlePhish
May 9, 2012, 09:10 PM
You have a LOT of suppressors. I'm jealous. :D

The Osprey 9mm sounded great.

230RN
May 9, 2012, 09:18 PM
I'm jealous that he can shoot right by his house. (Thanks for the backstop info.)

TurtlePhish
May 9, 2012, 09:39 PM
I'm jealous that he can shoot right by his house.

Yeah, that too... 40 minute drive for me. :(

fireman 9731
May 9, 2012, 10:48 PM
Some info on the "wet vs. dry" would be appreciated. I also don't know much about silencers either but I have never heard of it.

TurtlePhish
May 9, 2012, 11:14 PM
Some info on the "wet vs. dry" would be appreciated. I also don't know much about silencers either but I have never heard of it.


Shooting "wet" means that there are fluids of some kind inside the tube that help to absorb the gas as it expands, keeping it quieter until the fluid evaporates. "Dry" is exactly what it sounds like. Nowadays, the only suppressors that are shot wet are usually very small "micro" suppressors, some rimfires, or older ones. Most can be shot wet, but some manufacturers advise against it.

Ironman
May 10, 2012, 06:55 AM
^
This

You can however shoot any can wet just make sure if yo uused water that its dry after to prevent corrosion.

When you shoot wet the super hot gasses from the shot enter the can behind the bullet and turn the water into steam which expands and absorbs heat this also makes the hot gases have to expend energy. It takes alot of energy to convert the water to steam. It also slows the gasses through the can. So you are making the gasses work, cooling them, and slowing them down before they exit and enter the atmosphere which makes for a quieter shot.


Shooting wet also rids you of FRP (first round pop) in which the 1st shot is always loudest because the gasses ignite the available O2 inside the suppressor.

j1
May 10, 2012, 07:28 AM
Thank you for the excellent informative post. It goes down nicely with my first cup o Joe in the morning.

230RN
May 10, 2012, 12:40 PM
^ What j1 said, and add my thanks, too.

I'm uncomfortable with the explanations of first round pop. Why would O2 in the can make it louder? If the unburned powder coming out of the barrel contains its own oxygen to burn, it seems to me that O2 in the can and barrel wouldn't add to the pop.

The water absorbing energy by turning into steam explanation makes sense, but then why would "lithium grease" work except somehow as an added mass for the gases to work on and therefore lose some energy? Same thing with N2 or CO2 added to the can, although CO2 is more dense.

The two consistent variables in this seem to be:

(1) the air in the barrel ahead of the bullet, which is being compressed as the bullet comes out, but on the next shot, the barrel is filled with burned powder gases which are forced out ahead of the bullet instead of air.

and,

(2) whether the exhaust gases have to work on something else (CO2, lithium grease, spit) besides pure air before exiting the can.

I wonder if first round pop is really an acoustical coupling phenomenon, where the second shot exit gases, being of different characteristics (density, temperature, whatever) than the surrounding air, results in the blast wave not being "coupled" as well to the surrounding air as with that first shot. This would explain why gunking up the can and barrel with "almost anything else besides air" softens the noise a little, and eliminates first round pop.

Terry, 230RN

j1
May 11, 2012, 08:40 AM
I think that the lithium grease just helps prevent the hot gasses from blowing down the bore with the bullet, and helps them to enter the ports on the silencer.

Cesiumsponge
May 11, 2012, 09:49 AM
Lithium grease is pretty gross when it smokes and bakes off. Water-based wire pulling gel is more popular if you're looking for something more tenacious than water and less messy than greases.

Ironman
May 11, 2012, 09:50 AM
The FRP is from the o2. It was proven(forget where) that the silencer acted like a expansion chamber/extended barrel. And the o2 would ignite. Water is the best agent because the steam expands the water 1700x and absorbs alot of heat and displaces the o2 quick. It also cools the gasses which slow them down as they become more dense.

You can research silencers at silencertalk.com and learn a bunch.

I also have a ton of silencer videos on my channel where I show the innards.

Ironman
May 11, 2012, 09:52 AM
Cesiumsponge-

Correct, I use the gel alot but chose grease for the video as I didn't want to clean the cans(water corrosion) after the video as I only shot 5 rds each and the cans would still be wet. ;)

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