A very stiff hammer on a Dam Wesson .357 super Mag?


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cannonballmount
May 10, 2012, 08:17 PM
I acquired a "Dan Wesson .357 Super Mag" a while back, that looked like new except having a DING on the wooden grip, at an unbelievably low price, but I later discovered that the hammer was very difficult to cock and with a very very stiff trigger in double action mode. Can anyone suggest what might be wrong?

I also noticed some 2400 power loads for the ".357 max" in my old Sierra pistol handbook that I would like to try. I have not come across any other information on using that powder with that round. Has anyone else used those Sierra loads? I am eager to test that load and others if I can resolve my hammer problem.

I am looking forward to using this handgun on "mule deer" and on 'silhouette" shooting, if I can find a place with people still busting the iron farm animals in the Boise area.

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Peter M. Eick
May 10, 2012, 09:16 PM
My 357 Supermag has an exceptional trigger. Extremely smooth in double action and crisp in single. Something is wrong with yours in my opinion.

They are not difficult designs to take apart, but I would take it apart and see what is causing your issues.

2400 is a bit fast. Try 4227 or similar. I have even gone as slow as RL7 on mine. I generally shoot 4227 loads though.

chhodge69
May 10, 2012, 11:25 PM
Before diving in I suggest you pose your question over on the Dan Wesson forum:

http://www.danwessonforum.com/forum/

lots of knowledgeable folks over there, someone is bound to know just what's wrong.

Red Cent
May 11, 2012, 12:11 AM
The Dan Wesson has a unique double action process. Very short stroke in double action and a somewhat standard in single action although shorter than most.
Mine has been worked (by me) for double action competition and has a double action pull of around 7#s. Polishing all of the bearing surfaces is a must on any action job. The Dan Wesson trigger rebound spring is also somewhat unique and can be tricked or replaced with other aftermarket springs. If you reload and can avail yourself to Federal primers, you can optimize the tuning of the DW.
Using Federal primers, you can reduce the power of the hammer spring considerably.
The tuning of the DW double action is different than most and may require a knowledgeable gunsmith.

DWFan
May 11, 2012, 06:15 AM
Personal opinion....I would avoid 2400, W296 and H110 loads. I've seen loads using Lil'Gun, but can't recommend it from my experience. 4227 is my preferred powder. AA-1680 is also used by a lot of folks. Keep the bullets at 180gr and heavier. The 215gr Lyman #358627 SWC is a good "all-purpose" bullet.
A "fun" load is the 173gr Lyman #358429 SWC with Trail Boss.

content
May 11, 2012, 07:59 AM
Hello friends and neighbors // I bought a 15-2 once with that problem.

With the grip off it worked great.
It had the wrong grip screw and for some reason backing the screw out and adding an o-ring was all I needed to do. (still need to order an orig. screw)

I'm not a gun smith at all and very well might have gotten lucky.

hogshead
May 11, 2012, 08:00 AM
Dam Wesson? Thought you were gonna bash them.

Remllez
May 11, 2012, 10:02 AM
Content may be on to something, it costs nothing to remove the grip and see if it makes a difference. Otherwise removing the side plate and cleaning all the goo outa there with a brake cleaner/degreaser and oiling with your favorite lubricant may solve your problem, again worth a little effort.

One more thing to try is checking the B/C gap, just to make sure the cylinder isn't rubbing on the barrel shank. Opening the cylinder and cycling the action will settle that problem in a second and is the least invasive.

I've owned a few of these guns in my time and have found them to be fine trouble free shooting irons. Be aware that shooting plain old .357's is just fine, no need for the maximum rounds and the price per shot that comes with their use.

cannonballmount
May 11, 2012, 06:41 PM
Content may be on to something, it costs nothing to remove the grip and see if it makes a difference. Otherwise removing the side plate and cleaning all the goo outa there with a brake cleaner/degreaser and oiling with your favorite lubricant may solve your problem, again worth a little effort.

One more thing to try is checking the B/C gap, just to make sure the cylinder isn't rubbing on the barrel shank. Opening the cylinder and cycling the action will settle that problem in a second and is the least invasive.

I've owned a few of these guns in my time and have found them to be fine trouble free shooting irons. Be aware that shooting plain old .357's is just fine, no need for the maximum rounds and the price per shot that comes with their use.
I already read that shooting .38 special and .357 mag rounds in a .357 super mag workd fine, sort of like shooting .22 shorts in a .22 long rifle (but not quite!)...

I had an older cousin of years ago who shot rats in his barn with an old octagon barreled .22 long rifle "Iver Johnson" six-shooter. For years he used .22 shorts because the rats were not that large. Then during the exploding jack-rabbit population of the late 1940s the rabbits were eating his hay stack. He loaded up with long rifles and he took out six. But he had to pound out the cases to extract! Seems all the shorts had caused some erosion in the fore parts of the chambers and .22 long rifles would rivet themselves in when fired! He was stuck with using shorts only...

I would hate for that to happen to a "Dan Wesson" that might someday be a collectors item. I think I'll stick with "Trail Boss" for light loads and use my old 4 inch barreled .357 for heavy plinking.

Thanks though!!!

Steve CT
May 11, 2012, 10:26 PM
First off,you don't need to remove the grip, simply back the grip screw out one turn at a time to see if the grip screw is the problem. Incorrect grip screw length is THE MOST common cause of the problem you describe, incorrect B/C gap is the second. DW cylinder faces are sometimes not square, and one or two chambers can drag on the barrel, especially after shooting for a while and heating everything up. Check B/C gap on each chamber and set your gap on the tightest one.Many DW shooters gap as tight as .002", but on the tightest chamber.

hardluk1
May 12, 2012, 09:41 AM
Good info here. Barrel gap being to tight can cause cyclinder to barrel rub and stop or cause major effort to turn the cyclinder in DA mode. I have set mine to tight and had to learn what was to close. I run my DW's between 1 and 2 th's. If it works better in SA by cocking the trigger that may very well be the problem. Also if the last owner took out the trigger group for cleaning something my not have been put back together correctly. Might be why you got it for a graet price. Ether case. Take your time reading and learning about it. DO NOT let the run of the mill smithy touch it. Some can screw them up even more . EWKarms makes small parts and big and very good prices. CZ still has small parts. The guy that did blseing for DW at one time has Blue Ridge Blueing and also has small parts if needed.

Look at reloading manuals for 357 rem maximum, also brass and loading data. IT is only .005 shorter . You will be wanting H110, H4227 and some W296 loads for powders.

You can buy startline brass for the 360DW cartidge. This is a in between lenght case that has been easier to find a quality load for plinking and long range work. - read here for info.http://www.lasc.us/RangingShotDanWesson360Revolver.htm

Remllez
May 12, 2012, 12:10 PM
Cannonballmount,

The "erosion" you speak of is usually comprised of nothing more than carbon deposits. A thorough cleaning with a brass brush and Hoppes will cure that, happens all the time.

If you are worried about collector value in the future, unless it's unfired and in pristine shape with box, doc's, and "original period correct tool and feeler gauge all you really have is another used "Dan Wesson .357 Super Mag".

If you bought it as an investment put it up in the safe....:) if you bought it to shoot, fire away, shooting it won't necessarily have an adverse effect on the price some day as long as you maintain it properly. The flash, fireball, noise, recoil and cost of shooting .357 Super Mags is much ado about nothing unless you shoot long range matches.

Dans are nice, solid, accurate and underpriced for now but quite a few people are figuring out what a fine revolver they truly are and the prices are "on the rise" as of late. Enjoy your new gun!!!

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