Rossi Revolvers?


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Kiln
May 12, 2012, 04:10 AM
Hey I saw a Rossi revolver new in a local store for about $250. It is a small framed gun with a short barrel chambered in .38 special.

My question is, how do the new Rossi guns stack up to the older ones. Also, do you think they're worth the money for what they are?

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elano
May 12, 2012, 05:26 AM
I have had several older ones that were well made with good triggers and wood grips. The new ones seem to be a little cheaper made with rubber grips and stiff/gritty triggers. I would say they are ok, but not as good as the older interarms imports.

calaverasslim
May 12, 2012, 07:36 AM
I have a friend who bought 2 44 special Rossi pistols. Both are well made and solid. Hard to say.

You pays you money, you takes your chances

seaboss
May 12, 2012, 08:25 AM
I just bought a new Rossi R46102, which is their 2 inch blued .357.
Great revolver! Shoots well, double action trigger is starting to smoothen out some. Put about 300 rounds through it so far, and very pleased. Looking for an IWB holster, and this 6 shooter will be my next concealed carry piece.

Take care

bikerdoc
May 12, 2012, 09:18 AM
Had one for yrs as a truck gun, good shooter. Sold it for short money ( read almost free) to a poor niece in need of SD/HD gun, Still going strong. Now that she is doing better I might ugrade her and put back in the truck.

Kiln
May 12, 2012, 05:17 PM
I may save another $75 or so and get the .357 version instead. They look and feel pretty good but I have no experience with Rossi products. May go ahead and roll the dice on one though.

MCgunner
May 12, 2012, 07:38 PM
I have a .38 special M68 3" circa 1981...no pic currently available to link on this computer.

Here's my late 80s .22 caliber M511 sportsman. I LOVE this thing, extremely accurate. It has fired untold numbers of 550 round bulk pack Federals and still puts 'em under 2" at 25 yards. The new Federal "Auto Match" Walmart carries now will go into an inch for 6 shots at 25 yards. Amazing little kit gun and all stainless.

http://i40.tinypic.com/t9tg0l.jpg

Tex4426
May 12, 2012, 07:47 PM
Its a revolver...even when taurus was a sub par gun maker they made good revolvers...i dont think ive ever met a bad revolver...they are just to simple to make...just stay away from plus P loads and there will be no issue

MCgunner
May 12, 2012, 07:54 PM
I've shot plenty of +P in older interarms Rossis, no problem. It will accelerate wear, but I never saw any wear, didn't shoot 'em that much. The newer ones are +P rated and, of course, the .357 will handle 'em.

I still kinda miss my old stainless 4" Rossi 971 .357. It was a compact, light (barely over 30 ounces) carry and it really handled recoil of hot .357 well. It was an accurate gun, too. I traded it in on a .45 Colt Ruger Blackhawk I REALLY like. I could always get another, but I have a tack driver of a 4" Taurus M66 that shoots better and is of higher built strength, even if it is a might heavier to tote at around 38 ounces.

weregunner
May 13, 2012, 01:56 AM
That would be a Rossi 351/352 series.

I shoot the six shot 462 and have no problems at all.

jad0110
May 13, 2012, 09:19 AM
I've never owned a Rossi, but I'd think if it passes the revolver checkout (new or used), it should be good to go.

j1
May 13, 2012, 09:32 AM
Revolvers just eat up that cheap bulk pack ammo. Good plinking ammo. Have fun on the cheap. So does my 10-22.

The only thing I can add as I have owned no Rossi is that I think that all guns both rifle and revolvers were made much better years ago. Good topic to take a vote on but I do not know how to set that up as a voting poll.

Jim NE
May 14, 2012, 02:58 AM
I've mentioned my Rossi M88 several times. It's an old Interarms snubnose with a pinned barrel. I think very highly of it. I own a few classic S&W snubnoses or j frames, and have come to regard it as highly as those. It's not as quite svelte as the j frame, but feels sturdier, and may actually be superior in a few respects (better lock up, better timing - at least with mine.)

I've been tempted to buy one of the new Rossi .38's, especially the 351, both because of the quality of my old one and the great prices.

In terms of quality it's one of of those deals; while most gun nuts know the intricate details of eras and epochs of American made name brand guns (Bangor-Punta years for S&W, for example) there doesn't seem to be a lot of knowledge on the more affordable imports. Are the new Rossi's made in the same factory as the older pre-Taurus guns? I wouldn't know....I wouldn't even know WHO would know. Someone does, I'm sure. Is the quality the same? Couldn't tell you. All I know is that there are several people who like the new ones, and a few people who have had problems. By contrast, I don't believe I've ever heard anyone complain about the old ones. Doesn't mean they haven't, I've just never heard them.

The new ones have a life time warranty, so If I didn't have so many .38's already, and was looking for a gun on a budget, I'd probably buy a new one. If I could find on old pinned barrel Rossi, however, I'd DEFINITELY buy it. Just my 2 cents. Good luck.

ColtPythonElite
May 14, 2012, 03:03 AM
Twenty years ago I bought a Rossi 68 for 150 bucks. The firing pin cracked the first few rounds. After I put in a new firing pin, it proved to be a decent carry gun.

MCgunner
May 14, 2012, 10:09 AM
I've had firing pin problems especially in the Interarms guns from the early 90s. I replaced one with a fitted Smith and Wesson K frame firing pin and never had a problem after that. Cheap fix that didn't require sending it back to Interarms a SECOND time.

Are the new Rossi's made in the same factory as the older pre-Taurus guns? I wouldn't know..

Yes, they're owned by Taurus, now, and still made in the same Sao Paulo factory facilities.

www.taurusarmed.net covers Taurus and there is a Rossi forum there.

Boomie
May 14, 2012, 12:48 PM
Just say 'no'.

Biggest lemon gun I ever got was a Rossi .357 revolver. It shot great right up until the point where it didn't (6 months?). Then the cylinder would bind non-stop.

JRH6856
May 14, 2012, 01:16 PM
Then the cylinder would bind non-stop.

Loose ejector rod?

MCgunner
May 14, 2012, 04:27 PM
Loose ejector rod?


Probably. Or, he never cleaned it, leading/fouling at the BC gap. I've had the ejector rod tie up a M19 Smith. Not uncommon. Loctite cures all. :D

Confederate
May 14, 2012, 10:26 PM
http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh198/jriler/RossiPistols_2C.jpg

The Rossi .22LR (top) and .38 Special were both very well made revolvers, but
these were made under the Interarms importer.

JRH6856
May 14, 2012, 11:27 PM
I've had the ejector rod tie up a M19 Smith. Not uncommon. Loctite cures all.

I was looking at a Rossi revolver in a pawn shop a couple of months ago. Cylinder would not open without a considerable bit of force. Ejector rod was loose so I tightened it. Too bad the previous owner didn't know to do that. Someone had tried to fix it by taking a file to the forcing cone. I didn't have a gauge thick enough to measure the resulting cylinder gap. Otherwise, it was nice little gun...was. :fire:

Boomie
May 15, 2012, 09:19 AM
Nope, wasn't a loose ejector rod and the gun was kept clean. The cylinder developed a cant or something. Rossi had no desire to make the issue right either. This was in '96 or '97.

V1ROT8
May 15, 2012, 05:50 PM
Aren't the Rossi weapons covered under the Taurus Lifetime Warranty?

Jim NE
May 15, 2012, 08:22 PM
Are the new Rossi's made in the same factory as the older pre-Taurus guns? I wouldn't know..

Yes, they're owned by Taurus, now, and still made in the same Sao Paulo factory facilities.


Thanks for the info, MCgunner.

Yes, on the new Rossi's, I'm tempted to get one now and then, but I seem to hear about the occasional lemon every so often. I would only buy a newer one if it was brand new and covered by warranty.

wrs840
May 15, 2012, 08:45 PM
My Interarms-era Rossi 971 .357 Stainless 4"bbl. mfg 1992/1993 is a good gun.

I paid about $250 for it in a Pawn Shop a couple years ago because it checked-out solid and looks "as-new". No box or papers though. No complaints. I can't speak for the newer production ones.

huskybiker
May 16, 2012, 11:01 PM
Tommy Theis @ www.theisholsters.com has a really nice Kydex IWB (similar to a Crossbreed).

huskybiker
May 16, 2012, 11:04 PM
Here is my Rossi 462 with the new rosewood grips.

snakeman
May 16, 2012, 11:06 PM
I've got one of the newer models and its been great so far.

jahwarrior
January 9, 2014, 03:58 PM
Sorry to necropost, but Huskybiker, where'd you get those grips? I recently acquired a RYW, and while it's a solid shooter, I'm not fond of the grips.

hAkron
January 9, 2014, 09:43 PM
I have a thing for Interarms era late 1990's Rossi revolvers. I have a 6" 986 (cyclops), a 720 (3" 44 special), and a 6" 971. They are all decent cheap revolvers. The cyclops has a scope and is fun to shoot, but the grips are junk and fall apart. The 720 is a great design (think 3" k frame smith in 44 special), but it leads pretty badly...probably undersized cylinders...the 971 stainless hasn't been shot yet, but it feels very light for its size. They are just all cool cheap quirky revolvers.

PapaG
January 9, 2014, 10:09 PM
I have three, a 51 6" 22, a 357 with built in comp, and a 972 44 I inherited from my brother. All have good actions, shoot accurately and are reliable. No, they aren't Smith's or rugers and they are my "fun" guns. All are from the 70's and are way better than the stuff they are sending us for the showcase today. Still better than the sister Taurii.

Deltaboy
January 9, 2014, 10:30 PM
I have a .38 special M68 3" circa 1981...no pic currently available to link on this computer.

Here's my late 80s .22 caliber M511 sportsman. I LOVE this thing, extremely accurate. It has fired untold numbers of 550 round bulk pack Federals and still puts 'em under 2" at 25 yards. The new Federal "Auto Match" Walmart carries now will go into an inch for 6 shots at 25 yards. Amazing little kit gun and all stainless.

http://i40.tinypic.com/t9tg0l.jpg
I sold one like that and still regret it.

orionengnr
January 10, 2014, 08:23 PM
I wish they'd had the internet back when I had a Rossi revolver. I would have sold it to one of you guys, instead of throwing it in a lake... :)

Mine was an M69 (IIRC). Blued, 5-shot snub, wood grips. Bought it at an Estate Sale back in 1983 or so. Looked like it had never been shot. Don't recall what I gave for it, but it didn't seem like that much. Of course, everything was a bunch cheaper back then.

Okay, when I took it to the range, I could fire one shot, and under recoil the cylinder would un-latch and open about 1/8 inch. Not enough to be obvious, but just enough that when I attempted to move the trigger again...nothing. I figured it out quickly, slapped the cylinder closed, and squeezed off another round. same thing. And again.

I took it home, cleaned it (again), verified that the thumb latch was not sticking. The ejector rod was not bent or sticking, and was square at the rear end. I fiddled around, tried it again, same thing.

Took it to a gunsmith who advised me not to waste my money on crap. Basically said it would cost more to fix it than it was worth. I took his word on that, although that experience soured me on revolvers for the next 20 years.

I found a 4" S&W M-66 on GB for something absurd, like $250, in 2004. Bought it, and since then I have bought and sold a bunch of used S&Ws. None of them have given me the first moment's trouble.

Long story short, I hope your experience is different (better) than mine, but I know where I'm spending my money.

Onmilo
January 10, 2014, 10:31 PM
Wow, you threw a gun in a lake because a "Gunsmith" told you it wasn't worth fixing?
All it required was a stronger replacement cylinder latch spring.
At the very most, replacing the cylinder bolt.
Both jobs can be done in less than an hour and the cost would have been a tenth of the guns value.

Rossi would have fixed it for free at btheir repair center down in Florida though the turn around was pretty slow.
Now they are part of Taurus and getting repairs is a bit easier though just as slow.
BTW Most S&W parts can be fitted to Rossi guns.
I always thought them to be a sound value & kind of sad to see them go as I haver never felt quite the same about Taurus.

rswartsell
January 10, 2014, 11:26 PM
I think it depends on what you want and the habit of "proofing" your guns.

If you want the highest quality available (and are willing to pay for it), Rossi will never be your answer in revolvers. My experience causes me to rate them a bit above Taurus though. I realize they are essentially the same company but far too often the Taurus nameplate would either get a bit too ambitious or more lax in quality control.

If you are looking for a budget revolver that will simply do it's job and you are willing to sufficiently test before you count on them, you could do a lot worse than Rossi.

That's pretty much it in a nutshell.

RealGun
January 11, 2014, 08:00 AM
My Taurus 430 and my Interarms Rossi 851 are earlier vintage. I think they are both fine guns. My more recent Taurus Judge 2 1/2" cylinder, 3" barrel, SS looks and shoots like a fine gun too.

I looked at a new Rossi 851 and wasn't inspired to buy it. I wanted a 4", .38 Special, preferably with target sights, which does not allow many choices in my preferred stainless finish.

Resto Guy
January 13, 2014, 10:33 PM
I have one of the mid 90's 851 models myself. Thousands of rounds through it, and it still looks and shoots like new. I've been looking for a second one for a family member who wants mine, but can't find one as nice.

Hickok44
January 14, 2014, 02:37 PM
I have a 1993 model 720 (44 Special) It is an awesome weapon. Got it new. Best handgun Rossi ever made. Todays Rossi is not a weapon I would consider. The 720 has never let me down, or wanting. The trigger is super crisp, as good as any S&W. It is more accurate then I can shoot it. I carry it daily as my ccw.
I had a model 971 blued (357 magnum) Bought it new in 1998. I gave to my son. Never a problem with it. So I would say from the early 90s to the end of the 90s is what I would look for in Rossi.

Eb1
January 14, 2014, 02:43 PM
Love my Rossi M720 .44 Special.

palmetto99
January 14, 2014, 10:25 PM
I have a M518 .22 revolver. Great little revolver. It was also imported by Interarms.

thriller
January 15, 2014, 06:12 PM
Another vote in favor. I bought a 462 (2" ss 357 mag)last April. I never imagined I would like it as much, or shoot it as much as I do. Functions great. It had a small burr on the firing pin bushing I filed off. No problems since. Breaks clay pidegons at 20 yards no problem. I have prolly put 300 .357's and double that amount of 38's thru it. My brother has an SP101, and we shot them side by side. Although Rossi cannot match Rugers quality, we both prefered the Rossi to shoot, and shot it better.

Kiln
January 16, 2014, 04:39 PM
I ended up getting a Rossi R44102. With .44 mag the recoil is unbearable. Drop a couple rounds of .44 Special in that baby though and it is a sweet gun. Very large frame though, not really practical for anything but still fun.

If this experience is normal I wouldn't hesitate to grab another Rossi product.

RealGun
January 17, 2014, 08:47 AM
That's a long way from looking at a .38 Special.:scrutiny:

If I may offer a thought...I think you will do better to have a need or purpose in mind rather than impulsively grabbing whatever comes along because it's cheap or more toward what you want to afford. Now, I wouldn't be the first or last to be impulsive when something nice comes along, but I try not to fritter away money on stuff with zero collector value or that would take a big hit in resale.

Also, I have few that I wouldn't consider for CCW, hunting, home defense, or calling on in a crisis. Nothing wrong with a fun or range-only gun, but it wouldn't be a .44 Magnum that I don't like to shoot. That gun is primarily a reloader's gun.

IMO one who wants to shoot .44 Special should buy one scaled to that caliber only. It is a great carry gun in a dedicated caliber, medium size, but not the pussycat one finds when fired from a big frame, heavier than necessary, .44 Magnum. The .44 Special is appreciated more fully when it is the primary caliber in its own special design and appropriate weight.

Kiln
January 17, 2014, 07:42 PM
Realgun: I got it mainly for fun. I have a gun suitable for everything I "need", just not everything I want.

My collection: http://i848.photobucket.com/albums/ab47/Myguns223/001_zps4deadeae.jpg (http://s848.photobucket.com/user/Myguns223/media/001_zps4deadeae.jpg.html)

I 've actually accumulated 2-3 more since this picture.

Sock Puppet
January 17, 2014, 07:44 PM
Here's my old .38 Spec. Interarms imported Rossi M68:

http://i616.photobucket.com/albums/tt246/Ziaduck/Forum%20Pics/RossiM68001_zpsfc0f3494.jpg

http://i616.photobucket.com/albums/tt246/Ziaduck/RossiM68004_zpsd16e6be3.jpg

gym
January 17, 2014, 08:08 PM
My first gun was a 38 Rossi, a kid in the neighborhood sold it to me for 50 bucks in the early 60's, I probably overpaid. They actually are not bad little guns from what I have seen. Just don't put it where your mom will find it in with your socks.

Blade First
January 17, 2014, 10:52 PM
The 720 variants are perhaps the best revolvers Rossi ever built. I have owned them in all sight and hammer versions and still retain one...the 720 Covert...with 3" barrel and no-snag hammer which makes it an outstanding carry choice given the caliber.

Bit of a bother finding after-market grips, [nothing from the factory but those tacky rubber finger-grooves which scream CHEAP!] but I managed to fit some S&W factory J-frame square-butt grips which absolutely transformed it as a carry piece.

Given the frame size and 5-shot capacity in .44 Special [use the Blazer 200g load] you'll be satisfied.

... Mr. O

OCM
January 18, 2014, 11:30 AM
I got a Rossi 971 from a friend in need that had the rear sight blade (plastic) broken. Couldn't find a supplier, but found that the S&W "J" frame sight works, just a tad shorter. Got one off "E"Bay and cleaned it up, and the action is as smooth as butter. It compares equally with any Colt or S&W revolvers I own. Now to shoot it.....

Eb1
January 18, 2014, 09:41 PM
Blade First, my M720 carry likes heavy bullets closer to 250 grain. Just sharing information.

Sock Puppet
January 26, 2014, 11:39 AM
Recently picked up this M88 and finally got around to taking a picture. I haven't had a stainless Rossi since I (unfortunately) sold a .357 back in the 90's, and this one is in fine shape.

http://i616.photobucket.com/albums/tt246/Ziaduck/002_zps7e7bf70b.jpg

RealGun
January 26, 2014, 11:50 AM
Kiln - Realgun: I got it mainly for fun. I have a gun suitable for everything I "need", just not everything I want.

You're really workin' that sub-$500 range there. After an $800 gun or two, you won't look back.

Bob M.
January 26, 2014, 12:10 PM
Here's my M971.....2-1/2 Inch bbl. :)

Kiln
February 12, 2014, 06:24 AM
You're really workin' that sub-$500 range there. After an $800 gun or two, you won't look back.
Doubt it. I'm not too impressed by the quality difference between a Springfield XDM and an FN pistol. I've shot tons of different guns over time and nothing compels me to spend more than $700 on a pistol because the difference in quality just isn't there for the most part after a certain point.

WCraven
February 12, 2014, 10:01 AM
I guess it depends on which Rossi guns we are talking about Interarms or Taurus made.. it is known that both Rossi and S&W was owned by the same company way before Taurus buying Rossi and it is said that S&W helped Rossi make a better product by sending people down to the Rossi factory .. it is also said that Rossi bought some of the old S&W tooling and maybe what Taurus was really after in buying them.

The Interarms guns are the one's S&W helped make better and maybe why so many S&W parts will work inside of them like the M68 and M88 which I guess that old tooling would of been J-Frame. I have owned afew S&W guns from mid 70's and I can say that both of the Interarms Rossi M68 and M88 our step children of S&W and shoot just as good.

Also I will never own a modern S&W or Rossi gun myself as it's vintage or notting!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/DSCN0148.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/IMG_1023.jpg

WCraven
February 12, 2014, 10:14 AM
This is a 5 shot group from the Rossi M88 above @25 feet..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/004-8.jpg


Added 5 more to the same target and I can say the gun shoots true and better then me.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/005-9.jpg

Frizzman
February 14, 2014, 12:08 AM
I have a Rossi 720 Covert .44 spl. As others have stated, it is as well made as any S&W, Ruger or Colt I have had. It was a unique model that combined a medium frame chambering five rounds of .44 spl and made of stainless steel. My Covert Model has a three inch full lugged barrel, spurless hammer and is double action only. I put thirty rounds of my reloads using using Hornady 240 JHP over a moderate charge of Titegroup powder. The smooth double action allowed me to put all shots into center mass with ease. I carry it a lot and trust it...I have never had another Rossi but I hear the newer Taurus made Rossi's have issues common to Taurus revolvers.

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