Lever action .30-30: will they be produced in 2100?


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Nematocyst
May 13, 2012, 07:39 PM
So, I've been working too hard and am taking a few hours off on Sunday afternoon. Having all this idle time on my hands is dangerous, though, because it gives me time to think about questions like this.

As founder of this thread (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=258000&highlight=lever+336), I thought about posting it there, but I don't want to restrict this to Marlins (which may or may not make it through the Remlin period).

So, I thought I'd broaden the question to any lever in .30-30.

Note: Nobody can foretell the future, so this is pure fun and speculation.

Do you think lever actions in .30-30 will still be produced in 2100?

Now for the hard part: this is an essay question: why or why not?

If you enjoyed reading about "Lever action .30-30: will they be produced in 2100?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Badlander
May 13, 2012, 08:04 PM
They probably will not ne produced then but the ones that have not been melted for scrap will still be running. having been outlawed 60 years ago the ones left will be prized posesions of the few freedom fighters that have escaped capture by the World government forces. The rest of the population will be working for the rich and powerfull and living in huts made from whatever they can find.........................................

jmr40
May 13, 2012, 08:28 PM
I doubt it. I would not be surprised if lever actions that are actually historically accurate for the 1860's-1880's to still be be produced as reproductions on a limited basis.

The 30-30 and Winchester 94 had been obsolete for 3 years before the 1st box of ammo was ever sold. Neither were ever actually used in the old west. Had it not been for the Hollywood Westerns they would have died out by the end of the 1920's because as a hunting round far better options were available as early as 1892.

People buy them today because they think they are using a gun of historical significance. Most of which is based on Hollywood fantasy instead of fact.

Of course if Hollywood Westerns become as popular in the future as they were between 1920-1980 then we could see a resurgence of popularity. But even then people are much more informed today and I think the more historically accurate guns will be the ones to be produced.

Old Shooter
May 13, 2012, 08:33 PM
I think they will still be produced in 2100.

I could see within the space of the next 90 years between the UN treaties, anti-terrorist legislation, socialist government and continued mass shootings at malls, schools and even military bases the complete ban on all semi-auto "evil" rifles.

I don't think we would see the total ban on weapons but the civilian population would be restricted to single-shot, bolt action or lever-action rifles in selected, government approved "sporting calibers" only.

Mayby not even the bolt rifles if they pick up the reputation of being "sniper rifles".

Yeah...single shots and lever-actions for the "Jetsons" age.

Texan Scott
May 13, 2012, 08:44 PM
My hunting rifle in 2100 will be a driling- specifically, electron-accelerator (left barrel) and microwave emitter (right barrel) mounted over the sonic shock pulse emitter. My meat will be killed, sterilized, cooked, and shaked off the bone before I retrieve it from the field. My neighbors will think me a barbarian for eating the flesh of near-sentient species, and wondering how I've escaped prosecution for violating the feral hogs' civil rights. The .30-30 will be displayed in museums right between the slide rule and the internal combustion engine. The only good thing to come is that trial lawyers will be required to submit legal papers in 180 characters or less.

Of course there'll be .30-30s in the future. I can't accept the alternative.

moxie
May 13, 2012, 10:12 PM
Despite what jmr40 says above, I like the 336. I had a Texan model in the 60s and 70s. a tackdriver. Light and handled like a dream. I stupidly let it go and am now considering getting a replacement off the auction sites. Loved that gun!

So yes, I hope they continue to be made.

mgkdrgn
May 13, 2012, 10:31 PM
They are still making muzzle loaders today ...

Nematocyst
May 13, 2012, 10:39 PM
^ And fine ones (http://www.tcarms.com/firearms/muzzleloaders.php), too.

Still trying to grasp what kind of game an "electron-accelerator" would take.
I mean, they have a mass of 1/1865 daltons (where a dalton has the mass of a proton).
What's that going to take down? E coli?

BCRider
May 13, 2012, 10:58 PM
And those muzzle loaders shooting round ball are amazingly able to take down various types of game. I guess the game animals didn't get the memo about such guns and ammo being obsolete....:rolleyes:

Could it possibly be that the reputation of the .30-30 has more to do with the early success of this round and the various rifles for it at harvesting a wide array of game through most of the early half of the 20th century? Could it be that the fascination for the lever action stems from the grandfathers, fathers and other relatives that took sons and nephews out hunting and used a lever in .30-30? Or the fact that in tight woods where the range of the shots isn't long that the .30-30 does fine without punishing the shooter's shoulder or blowing the exit side out of the game?

Hollywood? I doubt it.....

Will it still be around as anything other than an oddity? It's hard to say. But it is as valid as a lot of other cartridges out there.

snakeman
May 13, 2012, 10:59 PM
No because I don't see civilians being allowed to have guns that far in the future.

Nematocyst
May 13, 2012, 11:02 PM
BCR, ditto that.

Jalexander
May 13, 2012, 11:06 PM
I think so, because they've made it this far. And as mgkdrgn observed, they're still making muzzle loaders. I still don't understand the contempt for the .30-30, though.

James

CraigC
May 14, 2012, 12:16 AM
Probably, there will always be sportsmen and shooters of discerning taste. ;)

ThorinNNY
May 14, 2012, 12:27 AM
Well, I doubt i`ll be around in 2100, but I think lever action 30-30 rifles will still be manufactured then. Rather than write a long essay on the subject, I`ll suggest you read
Winchester 30-30, Model 94 -The Rifle America Loves by Sam Fadala, if you can locate a copy. He makes an eloquent case for lever guns in 30-30.

DAdams
May 14, 2012, 12:47 AM
Yes, but unfortunately it may look like this. The 464 SPX. :barf:
http://www.mossberg.com/products/default.asp?id=31&section=products

GooseGestapo
May 14, 2012, 12:52 AM
After reading the hype, owning a half dozen bolt actions, all in "superior" cartridges/calibers, I finally got around to aquiring a Winchester M94 of dubious quality. I was smitten. Light, handy, capable of firing and cycling any round that will feed/eject- regardless of bullet weight or ballistics- as long as bullet exits the barrel. Not to mention it was FAR, FAR, More accurate than I'd been led to believe. And consider that it looked like it'd been used as a pry-bar to fence a ranch (gouges in the metal, dinged up stock with no finish...). I traded a used C-B radio for it n 1975. Refinished the metal, refinished the stock, (couldn't do anything about the reddish hue to the reciever....), and let someone talk me out of it....for 3X what I had in it...(broke college student...needed to fix my bicycle...)

I've owned half a dozen .30/30's, and still own one. It's sort of a gun I don't shoot/use much, but I'm embarassed, awed, amazed, and disgusted every time I take it out. It's a plain-jane K-Mart special Glenfield/Marlin M30 (half magazine, birch stock w/o impressed checkering as sold in the '70's). It will shoot MOA with ammo it "likes", and can be made to sound like an SKS for 6-shots.... (I once took down two deer on the run w/3 shots). A fellow hunter stood holding his bolt action/scoped earsplitten-loudenboomer with his mouth open and said he'd never "poo-poo" a .30/30 lever-action again... He also offered to "let me carry" his rifle while we were dragging the deer to the boat.... Two weeks later I picked him up to go hunting and he said look at this.... Pulled out a brand new Marlin M336 w/2-7x Leupold on it. Said guess what? -Its more accurate than the .xxxWbyMag..... I told him he'd have to shoot it 400-500rds to get it as "slick" as mine... And mine took 40yrs to "get right". He said, lets go get started "breaking it in..."

I'd never have thought that the Winchester 1873 would go back into production.

Yeah, they'll probably be making the .30/30 l/a's 88yrs from now...... Even the M94's are back in limited production in JAPAN of all places......
I'm still looking for a last year production .25/35 to match my M94 "Legacy" in .45Colt...I passed on one thinking I'd have time later to get one... Then "they" quit making them altogether...

Nematocyst
May 14, 2012, 12:57 AM
DA, my friend, you and I both know that Mossberg has zero business in levers and should stick to shotguns. :rolleyes:

Goose, I hear you. ;)

RPRNY
May 14, 2012, 01:46 AM
OP - great idea for a thread topic! Great answers posters. The 30-30 will survive through 2100 for several reasons. It is undergoing a renaissance or rehabilitation with gun writers so it is getting a boost that will help it along for the next decade or so. The levergun is part of our cultural iconography and will remain an economically viable product as long as brass cartridge firearms do. 30-30 is inseparable from the levergun and so the two shall soldier on into the 22nd century.

Jacob L Freeman
May 14, 2012, 06:40 AM
I believe they will be, but in very limited numbers. Walk into a gun shop in 1950 and you'd see levers and revolvers. Walk into one today and you'll see ARs, Glocks and Sigs. As technology evolves, older styles die out for the most part or completely. It's a sad fact, but it's life. Fortunately, there will always be those who keep them alive. I'm grateful for the modern day mountain men and SAAS for whom Hawkens and .45 Colts are still being made.

Carl N. Brown
May 14, 2012, 07:28 AM
I would not be surprised if lever actions that are actually historically accurate for the 1860's-1880's to still be be produced as reproductions ....
That's like saying today you would still see bows, crossbows, flintlock Kentucky rifles and caplock Hawkins rifles at the ranges and hunting fields today which is ... actually happening. Hmm.

Bushpilot
May 14, 2012, 08:18 AM
Do you think lever actions in .30-30 will still be produced in 2100?

I too think they will be around in limited quantities. But, unfortunately they won't be marketed as an equally viable hunting rifle but instead will be sold as a novelty to people who want to "step back in time." It will be similar to someone buying a repro 1860 Colt Army today, which is seldom if ever sold for it's original intended purpose any more.

Walk into a gun shop in 1950 and you'd see levers and revolvers. Walk into one today and you'll see ARs, Glocks and Sigs. As technology evolves, older styles die out for the most part or completely. It's a sad fact, but it's life.

For the first time I am not really that excited about the new "future" guns or the direction the industry as a whole seems to be going in. I'm already sick of "black and camo plastic." While I think that many of them are good guns from a performance stand point, they somehow still leave me "cold". Try as I might, I can't help but look at many new "black guns” as being not much more than simply "tools." I guess in the future I'll be shopping in the "novelty gun" isle.

Sav .250
May 14, 2012, 08:26 AM
88 years, to much of a stretch for me. :)

ThorinNNY
May 14, 2012, 01:29 PM
Nematocyst
I would like to join the Marlin 336 club .Spent a lot of time reading those posts. Time well spent. Thor

Haxby
May 14, 2012, 01:52 PM
They will be available as expensive reproductions. Only rich people from India and Congo will be able to afford them.

Kush
May 14, 2012, 03:36 PM
For the first time I am not really that excited about the new "future" guns or the direction the industry as a whole seems to be going in. I'm already sick of "black and camo plastic." While I think that many of them are good guns from a performance stand point, they somehow still leave me "cold". Try as I might, I can't help but look at many new "black guns” as being not much more than simply "tools." I guess in the future I'll be shopping in the "novelty gun" isle.

Well on the bright side, from what I've heard, when the US military finally replaces the m4/m16 they don't want it to be black because it sticks out on thermal or infrared (one of the two) more than other colors, so it might get better.

Nematocyst
May 14, 2012, 03:45 PM
This continues to be an interesting and fun thread.

Busy day, so for now, just this: Thor, The 336 "Club" is an open thread like any other on THR subject to the same rules. Anyone can post anytime; ownership of a 336 (or even a gun) is not a requirement, just an interest in 336. Hell we've even had a few members with Winchesters. :eek: :D

For a while, there were a number of "club" threads, but it was just a name, never meant to be serious. It's like Cheers tavern, where everyone knows your name. There are a few long timers there, but mostly people come and go as they have questions and interests.

So, come on in anytime. :cool:

Nem

YJake
May 14, 2012, 03:49 PM
My first rifle was a M94 in 30-30 when I was a kid and now my favorite handguns to shoot are 1911s and revolvers. Hell, I get excited just thinking about shooting my Colt Dragoons...

I guess you'll find me on the "Novelty Aisle" for the rest of my life, and being in my 20's I have a lot of time to spend there in the future.

-Jake

Kevin5098
May 14, 2012, 10:06 PM
Gott's principle says that the longer something has been around, the longer it is likely to be around in the future. For example, all else being equal, there is a 60% chance that the lever action 30-30 is in the middle 60% of it's lifetime. From this it can be calcuated that there is a 60% chance that the rifle will be made for between 29.25 and 468 more years. Google Gott's Principle for a thorough explanation.

MachIVshooter
May 15, 2012, 12:08 PM
The future.......what an interesting concept.

The hollyweird projections basically go one of two ways. It's either a very sterile environment with everyone driving brand new, space-ship like cars and having just a few possessions that are all state-of-the-art, OR it's doom and gloom, TEOTWAWKI situations with everybody in rags and scrounging for functional 20th century relics.

Reality is quite different. We look around today in 2012, and we still see implements of 50, 100 and more years in the past in common use. Cars, guns, blenders, coffee grinders, lawn mowers, the list goes on. Even I, as a 30 year, use (and mostly drive) things made well before I was born. Why would the future be so vastly different?

It is possible that citizens may be unarmed 90 years from now, but if we can still own firearms, I'll bet that the lever action rifle will remain in many American homes even when personal conveyance machines hover and internet is used via implants in the brain ;)

jim243
May 15, 2012, 12:42 PM
People buy them today because they think they are using a gun of historical significance. Most of which is based on Hollywood fantasy instead of fact.

This is singularly your point of view. And has no basis in fact, more like fiction. I purchase firearms for fuction and their ability to do a job. A short barreled brush gun in the northern woods will more likely take a game animal than a long barreled hunting rifle.

I am not a fan of the lever action rifle, but yes I do own a Marlin 336C (not in 30-30 but in 35 remington). I also own a Remington 7600 in 30-06, these are hunting rifles (carbines) not of historical value, but of game getting value.

If you are a collector then you are purchasing for the historical value and will most likely buy a caliber other than 30-30. So you can take your Hollywood garbage and put it where it belongs, in the trash.

I respect historical collectors and while I do not share their likes and tastes, I can see their point of view and more important RESPECT their choices.

Jim

Arkansas Paul
May 15, 2012, 02:28 PM
For the first time I am not really that excited about the new "future" guns or the direction the industry as a whole seems to be going in. I'm already sick of "black and camo plastic." While I think that many of them are good guns from a performance stand point, they somehow still leave me "cold". Try as I might, I can't help but look at many new "black guns” as being not much more than simply "tools." I guess in the future I'll be shopping in the "novelty gun" isle.


I'll see you on that novelty isle bro.
I would like to have an AR but like you, I view it only as a tool. If you want stone cold sexy, you've got to have wood and blue, prefferably in a lever or bolt rifle, or side by side shotty.

T.R.
May 15, 2012, 09:07 PM
When my Dad was born in 1922, only 3 leverguns were offered in 30-30:
- Winchester
- Marlin
- Savage

In 2012, there are even more choices:
- Henry
- Mossberg
- Rossi
- Marlin
- Winchester

The marketplace has proven that 30-30 rifles are still popular. Yes, I'm certain that 2100 will come and go but 30-30 will live on. I tend to be a cheerful and optimistic person.

But I'm not buying into the myth that cowboy movies help sell 30-30's. The cartridge kills far better than paper charts would suggest. This is widely known by hunters who choose this cartridge for hunting within forests and foothills.

TR

GambJoe
May 15, 2012, 09:18 PM
No we will be living in a utopian socialist Islamic society where walnut wood is reserved only for the most pious and all wild animals will be on birth contol. Except Amerian Bisons.

30-30 lever guns will be diplayed at only at historical museums to show how misrable life was in the former USA before Obama's 50 year reign.

But seriousely, with new Winchesters going for over a thousand today they might still be around but rare.

336A
May 15, 2012, 09:24 PM
The 30-30 and Winchester 94 had been obsolete for 3 years before the 1st box of ammo was ever sold. Neither were ever actually used in the old west. Had it not been for the Hollywood Westerns they would have died out by the end of the 1920's because as a hunting round far better options were available as early as 1892.

You clearly don't have all your facts together. Though not the 1880's Wyoming was pretty wild well into the early 1900's. Tom Horn was a notorious stock detective for WSGA and his weapon of choice was the Win 1894 in 30/30. He used that rifle with very good effect until his arrest in 1901. The good ol' 30/30 will be around for a long time to come, it still ranks in the top 10 rifle cartridges being sold annually.

Tomcat47
May 15, 2012, 09:48 PM
^^ Yep ^^

But I'm not buying into the myth that cowboy movies help sell 30-30's.........:what:................:scrutiny:

after 118 years..............88 more!.............No Problem! :D

Nematocyst
May 15, 2012, 11:05 PM
Behind ... reading now ...
will update ...
____

Caught up reading.

I have just this to say for now:

Da'um, this is an interesting thread ...

Running high tide, like Fundy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_of_Fundy).

What say you?

NoirFan
May 16, 2012, 01:01 AM
The hollyweird projections basically go one of two ways. It's either a very sterile environment with everyone driving brand new, space-ship like cars and having just a few possessions that are all state-of-the-art, OR it's doom and gloom, TEOTWAWKI situations with everybody in rags and scrounging for functional 20th century relics.


No no, these days the post-apocalypse fashion zeitgeist is swinging back towards the Old West. See "Book of Eli" or "Priest" if you don't believe me. If civilization collapses it won't be fifteen minutes before everyone throws away their modern guns and starts dressing up like cowboys and schoolmarms. I forsee a healthy future for the lever 30-30 :)

Nematocyst
May 16, 2012, 01:05 AM
^ Or, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. :D

Nematocyst
May 16, 2012, 01:09 AM
Of course, one of the benefits of levers is,
like in the days of points and carburetors,
before the days of electronic ignition and fuel injection,
with a screwdriver and emery paper,
one can fix a lever gun.

Can't do that as easily with newer designs.

:neener: :evil:

JustsayMo
May 17, 2012, 11:45 AM
I'll put on my swami hat and look into the imaginary bowl of water and foretell the future...

Leverguns are no longer produced, nor are any others. The "Long Emergency" began 85 years earlier - Fiat money collapsed, fossil fuels became scarce due to international conflicts, demand drove the prices out of reach, the great famine resulted, governments and nations became irrelevant, small remote farming communities adapt to the "New Normal" using more primitive labor intensive techniques (and draft animals) due to the inability to get fuel for the equipment. The food grown there is consumed locally as transport is next to impossible not only due to fuel shortages but the lack of refrigeration and dangers of travel through areas without the "rule of law."

During this interval of disorder and subsequent reorganization to a much more localized existence much technological expertise will have been lost. Even those with the experience and knowledge that have survived will not have the communications beyond the local. Books were lost in the great fires that burned out of control across the nation and in the stoves that heated and cooked meals in the small shanty homes of those with the fortitude and will to live.

My Marlin 30-30 will have passed two or three hands beyond me. The stores of loaded ammunition and components- powder, primers and bullets - long gone, its owner now salvages the powder from other ammo scrounged or traded for, carefully presses out the primers and recasts the bullets. They are used only in an emergency or when a game animal of significant size cannot be trapped or snared which are then dispatched with a club or spear in order to save the precious ammunition. It most likely sits at the ready, much like it does now, capable and reliable, it's stocks and bluing bearing scars of "experience."

About 2800 societies will again reach a technological level where steel can be made and machines are once again used to produce tools. Someone will find my old Marlin, marvel at its genius and replicate it.

But don't take my word for it... I'm just guessing. :neener:

Sheepdog1968
May 17, 2012, 12:10 PM
I don't see a technology replacing firearms any time soon. Even if lasers become possible I suspect government won't let civilians own them. Thus firearms will likely be around. A good classical design is timeless. We will have lever actions and 1911s etc. the calibers that have been around for 50 to 150 years will still be there. Sadly I likely will be worm food by then.

Kush
May 17, 2012, 01:01 PM
Lasers will never replace firearms, no one would use a weapon that would cauterize the wound that you just made. You think people complain about the lack of stopping power of some rounds now, just wait until they get to complain about a weapon where shot placement is even more important as there would be no expansion of the projectile nor the person bleeding, not to mention problems with overpenetration. However electrolasers and particle beams that stop the target by electrocuting them may be accepted.

Comedian
May 17, 2012, 04:21 PM
People buy them today because they think they are using a gun of historical significance. Most of which is based on Hollywood fantasy instead of fact.Non-replica swords, bows, crossbows, and muzzle loaders are still manufactured and sold today despite having no implied historical significance. Provided there is still a firearms industry and it's still legal for civilians to purchase them I see no reason they'd suddenly die out.

henschman
May 17, 2012, 04:38 PM
They still make Brown Besses and Charleville Muskets nowadays... it seems that reproductions of the best weapons from any era have always been made. I fully expect that reproduction lever actions will still be made in 2100.

I will tell you that if my future great-great-grandkids ever get rid of the Winchester 94 that I will be passing down to them, whether by sale or by surrendering it to some armed tax-eaters, I will come back and b!tch slap them from the grave.

That is, if I can't do it in person with my cybernetic arm... here's hoping someone figures out how to digitize human consciousness in the next 55 years or so!

BoltActionPrepper
May 17, 2012, 05:05 PM
possibly i think....but more for nostalgias sake than anything else....they still produce flint-locks for that very reason.

Jason_W
May 17, 2012, 08:10 PM
Barring a worst case scenario meltdown of civilization, I'm sure leverguns will still be produced in 2100. The design is practical and affordable for a variety of uses.

It's possible that there will be improvements made to the design, though. Maybe they will be made from stronger, more corrosion resistant materials. Perhaps advances in propellent technology will ramp up the performance potential of existing cartridges.

I won't live to verify this, but I have a feeling that if humanity ever colonizes other worlds, the settlers - in a manner similar to their 19th century American counterparts - will be sporting wood and steel leverguns.

Nematocyst
May 17, 2012, 09:23 PM
... I have a feeling that if humanity ever colonizes other worlds, the settlers
- in a manner similar to their 19th century American counterparts
- will be sporting wood and steel leverguns.
What a cool image: Luc Piccard sporting a .30-30 lever. :D

They will be assimilated!

BCRider
May 17, 2012, 09:38 PM
More like the fringe worlds in the Firefly universe.

tarosean
May 18, 2012, 01:17 AM
Yes... Sooner or later these shtf knuckleheads will realize that is not going to happen, so they will need a real gun thats proven itself for hundreds of years. :)

mustanger98
May 18, 2012, 08:19 PM
I know the .30-30 cartridge and various leverguns chambered for it do the job. My first deer joined his ancestors pretty rapidly. My Daddy once opined that he doesn't know why I shoot anything else. My old '94 just fits and works for me.

"Firefly" got mentioned... I was noticing that too.

Whether leverguns will still be produced in 2100 I couldn't say. Browning discontinued the A5 several years back. FN closed the New Haven Winchester plant. I was rather disgusted with both actions, but they didn't ask any of us. I can say I HOPE they'll be produced and affordable.

By this account, I shop the "novelty" and antique aisles too. Older designs are just a lot more enjoyable to some of us.

Owen Sparks
May 18, 2012, 10:24 PM
The kicker is none of us will ever find out.

jdh
May 19, 2012, 05:36 PM
Owen,
Speak for yourself. I make a threat to my VA case manager to live to be at least 200 years old. A threat I intend to keep. That will put me well past 2100.

On the other hand the world is going to come to an end this December.

jeepnik
May 19, 2012, 09:09 PM
No, the 30-30 will be scientifically proven not to be enough gun for deer.:neener:

But, 45-70 leverguns will still be produced and will still be killing the biggest and baddest critters on this world, and any others we happen to inhabit by then.:D

Googleplex
May 19, 2012, 09:48 PM
Pssshhhaawww... In 2100 mankind will have devolved significantly following a major appocalyptic disease that infected only intellectuals. And henceforth, the gun designers of the future will end up reinventing the wheel-lock. :uhoh:

HOOfan_1
May 19, 2012, 10:19 PM
I hope so...how else will I arm every Zig to keep Cats from taking all my base the next year??

Click For Great Justice (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WikHpuwdPFs&feature=related)

Nematocyst
May 19, 2012, 10:34 PM
And suddenly, the thread veers into the realm of humor, science fiction and apocalyptic predictions. :eek:

Re .45-70: I hope that one survives, also, along with .22 and .38/.357 mag in lever.

CZguy
May 19, 2012, 10:57 PM
I think that lever action 30-30s will still be made in the next century.

But I believe that they will be made from something other than steel and wood.

If you stop and think about it, can't you imagine someone one hundred years from now, looking at a Glock and marveling at how labor intensive they were to build.

Googleplex
May 19, 2012, 11:00 PM
Ain't nothing ever gonna replace the .22. Everybody makes one. And then there's mossberg keeping up with the times, slapping a synthetic m82 style muzzle-break on their bolt action plinksters. :what: The future looks REAL bright, don't it? The .45-70 already went away once- then it was revived by Marlin. Best thing Marlin ever did, and they did a lot of good things back in their day. I got an 1895 from 2008. It was after the FGI buyout, but it was before the New Haven factory closed, and before it became common knowledge that New Haven was doomed. It's fantastic. The .45-70 is a wonderful cartridge. I too hope it stays around this time. I would say the .45-70 is one of the most versatile cartridges of all time.

I have to agree with CZguy. It's already happening- just look at that goofy mossberg.:barf:

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 12:04 AM
This (http://www.marlinfirearms.com/firearms/Centerfire/336BL.asp) is the one I want in .30-30.

Yeah, it's a Remlin, but I'll send it to a gunsmith to tune it up.

http://www.marlinfirearms.com/images/centerfire/photo-336BL.jpg

Googleplex
May 20, 2012, 12:14 AM
Very nice. I love the Marlin looks. It's such a shame what FGI has done to that fine company.:(

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 12:35 AM
Had to search 'FGI'.

http://www.freedom-group.com/

Why did they do that to Marlin?

19-3Ben
May 20, 2012, 12:46 AM
Here's another thought that I don't believe has been brought up.
Think about legislation. At some point, someone could re-ban standard capacity EBRs; ban hunting rifles for being like "sniper rifles," etc... etc...

The levergun is a rather innocuous looking rifle with low capacity, and very "American." I think that if we see a ban in this country they way they have in several European countries, the leverguns will be among the last to be banned. They are the just about the most "politically correct" type of rifle, and would still make a darned fine fighting gun in a pinch.

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 12:53 AM
^ +1.

No. Wait. Did I really write, "+1"? :uhoh:

Oh, yeah. Guess I did. Oh well. :evil: :cool:

Googleplex
May 20, 2012, 12:55 AM
I've heard that the guy who runs it is a staunch anti-gunner, but it may just be that he's an aristocratic moron trying to be the next Oliver Winchester- and failing miserably. I'm not sure, but as bad as Marlin has gotten, I'm inclined to think it's the first reason. It isn't like Remington, whom FGI also owns, is any semblance of their former glory, either. Luckily, FN owned companies are still producing quality, and Smith & Wesson is also a holding company, so whatever companies in which they are the primary stock holders (T/C, etc.) are safe. And then there is also Colt, which is fairing well and unlikely to be purchased any time soon.

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 01:01 AM
(T/C, etc.)

I can only dream of T/C taking over Marlin.

Can you imagine what they'd produce?

whalerman
May 20, 2012, 01:07 AM
If I were to buy a new Marlin, made by Remington, what should I be worried about? What are they doing wrong? What will I need to be on the lookout for? If they're such a bad company, simply sending it back won't be a promise of a fix. Is buying a new one simply out of the question?

Googleplex
May 20, 2012, 01:07 AM
A lever action break open katahdin carbine with a thumbhole stock, underbarrel muzzleloader attachment, and side-mounting single shot shotgun. Calibers include .458x2 American, .309 JDJ, 7-30 Waters, and 1 inch photon gama incindiary ray. Bolt action variant coming soon.:what:

Whalerman- sometimes the bolt won't even close properly due to poor barrel alignment or excessively rough surfaces on the bolt. The wood is now some low grade walnut plywood sort of thing as opposed to a well finished walnut stock, screws may be improperly threaded, sights may be loose, and I've even heard of parts missing altogether on a NIB rifle. Scary stuff.

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 01:12 AM
^ Yeah, something like that.

(But not that's not what Whalerman needs to be worried about.
His post just happened to be in the same minute (12:07) as yours.
That's what he should look forward to. ;) )

Googleplex
May 20, 2012, 01:17 AM
Got 'er covered. And whalerman, too. Dayam, I'm good.:cool: That 1 inch photon gama incindiary oughta be just the ticket for taking erant woodchucks.:scrutiny:

Panzercat
May 20, 2012, 01:24 AM
First, let's define a levergun... Are we talking the same configs as we see today? If so, it will probably be an anachronism, only seen in a minority of settings.

But if you expand on that a bit... Allowing for stronger materials, faster propellants, guided bullets... I really don't see why not. Sounds silly but we're talking 2100ad. I'm sure I can find some use for my 15+1 space alloy levergun with guided hyper velocity rounds and real wood furniture. And if you want a tiny glimpse of that, hornady says "hi". Sure the format will never be cutting edge, but a levergun is still a great peace keeper / hunting platform no matter how you slice it.

IMO and all that.

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 01:29 AM
Zoom <lever> zoom.

HOOfan_1
May 20, 2012, 01:32 AM
I've heard that the guy who runs it is a staunch anti-gunner,

An internet fabrication disproven time and again

Nematocyst
May 20, 2012, 01:36 AM
Good. Then he can improve the quality of Marlins,
which were fine for decades before the transition. :scrutiny:

Tahitian.Ted
May 20, 2012, 01:42 AM
What is the email address needed to sign into the lever 30-30 thread

(tahitian.ted@gmail.com) Thanks, Ted

Art Eatman
May 20, 2012, 05:06 PM
Tahitian, are you new to the Internet and emailing?

Don't jump on him, folks.

valnar
May 20, 2012, 05:13 PM
Maybe by 2100 Remlin will get them right.

Walkalong
May 20, 2012, 06:06 PM
to sign into the lever 30-30 thread
The 336 thread?

Just post...

Here it is.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=258000

CmdrSlander
March 2, 2013, 05:53 PM
If we are ever hit with a Semi-Auto ban then yes, because lever actions will become the default all purpose rifle (Jeff Cooper's 'street sweeper' - a 336 with a 16" barrel and tritium illumn'd ghost rings sights comes to mind). If not, then probably still yes, because it is a design that cannot be killed, sort of like the M1911. Will they be production rifles? Perhaps not.

I fear that guns will go the way of say, fine swords and the like, presentation items not considered to have a practical use that are bespoke, hand crafted pieces whose price limits them to the rich and connected. If this does happen then guns of the "old west" will be quite popular because the cowboy mythology will endure as long as America does and perhaps even beyond that.

ZeSpectre
March 2, 2013, 06:04 PM
Nah, they won't be "produced" but if someone wants one they'll have to pay a licensing fee and then they can whip one up on their 3D printer or matter compiler (http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/content.asp?Bnum=241) or whatever outgrowth of that production tech exists by then.

(and if you think THAT idea is impossible far-fetched science fiction then you need to keep up with the scientific journals more).

Roadking Rider
March 2, 2013, 06:27 PM
Heck I'm not sure at the rate we're going there will be a world left. Much less guns. If by chance the world is still here I doubt we'll still be using lead or any kind of bullets especially ones using gun powder.. Think about how far we've come in weapons in the last 100 years. Technology is moving faster than ever, so no I do not think they will be producing lever action gun rifles. The ones that remain will be old wall hangers in someones man cave. As for now though I love my Marlin 336C.

Nematocyst
March 2, 2013, 10:27 PM
Thread back from the dead. Good to see this one still kicking.

Interesting to see what opinions are now in light of recent events and politics.

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