My how things have changed!


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ole farmerbuck
May 13, 2012, 11:47 PM
My neighbor gave me about 10 boxes of 22-250 cases that he's had for a while. I couldnt believe the prices back then. Wow!
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn88/farmerbuck/prices.jpg

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FROGO207
May 14, 2012, 12:08 AM
Yeah don't you know it.:( It wasn't that long ago that one could buy loaded rounds for what you now buy brass for in the semi common calibers.

ole farmerbuck
May 14, 2012, 01:17 AM
Yep,$3.53 isnt too bad for a box of ammo.

Warp
May 14, 2012, 01:20 AM
What was minimum wage at the time? Gallon of gas? Median income? Avg cost of a new home? Don't forget to put prices in the proper context when going historical.

M2 Carbine
May 14, 2012, 01:56 AM
My how things have changed!

$17 for this then NIB GI 1911A1. I bought it from the government (yes our government) and it was delivered to the house by the Postman.
http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/1911A1Remington.jpg

This 03A3 and 03A4 cost $14.50 each. Also bought from our government and delivered to my house.
It's too bad THE government is no longer OUR government.
http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/03A3ontable.jpg

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/03A4CMP.jpg

The M1 Carbines were pretty expensive at $20 each.

M1 Garands were very expensive at something over $50, as I recall.
http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/M1bayonet.jpg


Guns up to and including anti-tank guns could be bought from magazine ads.
Such as German Lugers cost about $20. No government Red tape at all.



Check the dates on this $4 a box 9mm from Academy.
http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/9mmWWB.jpg


This Wolf 7.62x39 isn't too bad at $60/1,000 rounds but I still have a number of cases that cost me $54/1,000 round cases.
http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x464/Bell-helicopter-407/Ammoin50calcans.jpg

Warp
May 14, 2012, 02:08 AM
The stuff from 10-15 years ago is what gets really depressing. :(

I didn't start shooting and buy my first gun until 2005, and even the prices then seem like a pipe dream now.

FROGO207
May 14, 2012, 09:32 AM
Wishful thinking is OK but we can start the process of reversing this mess next Nov don't ya know.:cool: Anything worth having is worth spending the time it takes to get it. IMHO.:scrutiny:

Ryanxia
May 14, 2012, 09:53 AM
Marvelous that things were once so cheap (and not because of inflation but the over regulation and gouging of today).

Owen Sparks
May 14, 2012, 11:12 AM
Two things have caused the price of ammo to go up so much recently. One is the Worldwide demand for copper. India and China are going through something like the US did in the 1950's with rural electrification only China has about five times as many people as the US and India has about three times as many. This takes a lot of copper wire and they just can't dig the stuff up fast enough to meet demands. A short supply means high prices. This is basic economics.

The other culprit is inflation. This is when the governments increases the money supply via the printing press. Every time the money supply increases by 1% it makes the dollar in your pocket lose 1% of its buying power. Normally this happens so slowly that the average person does not notice but lately with all the stimulus spending and quantitative easing it is becoming more apparent. Since the Federal Reserve started printing unbacked currency in 1913 the dollar has lost over 95 percent of its value. In other words a box of amunition that cost grandpa $1 in 1913 would cost you $23.17 plus tax! Don't take my word for it, see for yourself:

http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

Then come back and tell me Ron Paul is crazy for wanting to go back to the inflation proof gold standard.

dcarch
May 14, 2012, 11:20 AM
This type of stuff really depresses younger shooters like me... You have no idea how much I wish I was my age during the '50s sometimes. I could have done the black leather jacket and hot rod Mercury thing... And that $17 1911 just makes me want to cry. Ah well. At least we have AR-15s.

HGUNHNTR
May 14, 2012, 11:27 AM
Yeah, I paid 5.99 for 9mm back in 2004, but I was making a heck of a lot less money than I am now. Costs increase, it's a part of life. Look at all of the improvements that have happened over that same time. I am one ot be a bit nostalgic from time to time, but looking back and longing for the "good ol days" will just prevent you from enjoying the present and preparing for the future.

SlamFire1
May 14, 2012, 11:44 AM
At the time you could buy ammunition for $3.53 a box, I will bet the minimum wage was close to $1.25.

Look that old ammunition is at least 40 years old. A rule of thumb for gunpowder shelf life is 45 years for single based and 20 years for double based. People have posted pictures of IMR powders that went bad in the can from the 80's, so these are just rules of thumb.

If the powder is going bad you could have split case necks upon firing, or worse, pressure spikes. Old gunpowder does not burn evenly and I have found references to blown up rifles with old ammunition.

Pull a couple of bullets and look for green corrosion on the bases. This is from nitric acid gas coming out of old gunpowder. If you see spots like this, I would dump the powder out of all of them. If I saw this I would also be suspicious of the cases, but that would be your call.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Reloading/Old%20Gunpowder/DSCN1108CorrodedBullets.jpg

M2 Carbine
May 14, 2012, 12:40 PM
If the powder is going bad you could have split case necks upon firing, or worse, pressure spikes. Old gunpowder does not burn evenly and I have found references to blown up rifles with old ammunition.


I have about a thousand rounds of 1942 GI 45ACP. It has lost about 25 FPS muzzle velocity. The surprising thing is the stuff is more accurate than just about any current 45 ACP I use.


When I bought those guns (early 1960's) the low middle income was about $100 a week.
So they cost about 15-20 percent of a person's weekly salary.

The cost of the guns and ammunition is of small importance compared to the lack of government intrusion then and how the government is trying to control ever aspect of our lives now.


Something else that's interesting is, back when guns were so unregulated and cheap and easy to own, even by children, there was no such thing as school shooting, kids "accidentally" shooting themselves, friends or family members, etc.

chris in va
May 14, 2012, 02:25 PM
There were also a lot fewer guns and people in the US.

Warp
May 14, 2012, 02:50 PM
In other words a box of amunition that cost grandpa $1 in 1913 would cost you $23.17 plus tax! Don't take my word for it, see for yourself:

http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

Then come back and tell me Ron Paul is crazy for wanting to go back to the inflation proof gold standard.

Do you realize that only represents a rate of 3.22%?

The US Treasury has been issuing RISK FREE Bills and Bonds as far back as at least 1928.

The geometric average interest rate on T-bills over that time frame: 3.61%

On Treasuring bonds: 5.14%

Owen Sparks
May 14, 2012, 02:50 PM
Look at how much the price of copper wire has gone up in the last 20 years. It has far outpaced inflation.

Warp
May 14, 2012, 02:54 PM
Look at how much the price of copper wire has gone up in the last 20 years. It has far outpaced inflation.

Of course. That will happen due to supply and demand.

That is part of my point, exactly. You cannot blame fiat currency (vs a gold standard) for that.

Ryanxia
May 14, 2012, 02:58 PM
M2 Carbine - as you said 15-20% of a low-middle income for some nice guns. If today's average low-middle income is around say $600/week at would be $120 in today's money. Sounds pretty good to me, but like you said, the government/regulation/etc. had to muddy things up which I think adds a bit to the cost. And of course people are probably more greedy these days :)

Owen Sparks
May 14, 2012, 03:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen Sparks
Look at how much the price of copper wire has gone up in the last 20 years. It has far outpaced inflation.

Of course. That will happen due to supply and demand.

That is part of my point, exactly. You cannot blame fiat currency (vs a gold standard) for that.


Fiat currency is part of the problem. Inflation is nothing more than an increase in the money supply. Like you said, simple supply and demand. The more money they print the less it will buy.
Play with the Inflation Calculator below to see exactly how much the currency has been debased.

http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

ny32182
May 14, 2012, 03:21 PM
Just think about how terrible life will be 10, 15 years from now... you should learn from the past, and rush out and buy 500,000 rounds right now at the super low prices of today. It is a limited time offer! Why are you still reading this? Get out there and buy ammo; it is a GREAT deal right now!

Warp
May 14, 2012, 03:26 PM
Fiat currency is part of the problem. Inflation is nothing more than an increase in the money supply. Like you said, simple supply and demand. The more money they print the less it will buy.
Play with the Inflation Calculator below to see exactly how much the currency has been debased.

http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

Good thing there are a lot of investment opportunities that will increase in value over time, and that your wages go up over time, eh?

Prince Yamato
May 14, 2012, 04:00 PM
We could always just import cheap Chinese ammo again...

kb58
May 14, 2012, 04:15 PM
Wishful thinking is OK but we can start the process of reversing this mess next Nov don't ya know.
Hate to break it to you, but Santa doesn't exist either.

Warp
May 14, 2012, 04:16 PM
I laughed.

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