Brand new Marlins..... are they really that bad?


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Jacob L Freeman
May 14, 2012, 05:57 AM
It seems that I've picked a rather inconvienent time to get into shooting.

Ever since seeing some SAA videos and talking to people who own lever guns, I've been wanting one. Badly. I decided the Win 94 was the one for me, but I've read just too much enough bad news lately about how the quality just isn't the same anymore and decided to put my quest for one on hold until I can afford a pre-64.

So my next choice was Marlin. My dad has a 336 that is a blast to shoot, so I checked out their models. I fell in love with the looks of the stainless steel on grey wood guide gun and the thought of 45-70 power.

But now I read that Marlin too has suffered from a lack of quality ever since the Freedom Group/Remington takeover? Not at all what I wanted to hear. I certainly have nothing against a used gun, but this is one I really wanted to own new out of the box. I shoot recreationally, and honestly probably won't ever hunt, although the thought of it excites me. So, for a person who shoots for fun instead of possible bear attack (where I obviously wouldn't take any chances) are Marlin's new rifles still worth it? Have any parts changed or is it mostly fit and finish issues? Are there bad apples in the mix with the diamonds? And how do I tell?

If a used rifle is the only option I should consider, did they make the type I'm after (SS, short barrel, 45-70) before quality went downhill? I would not be opposed to 30-30 either. Thanks all in advance!

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Pilot
May 14, 2012, 07:06 AM
You can my used, older Marlin 336's all day long. Go that route.

Salmoneye
May 14, 2012, 07:17 AM
If a used rifle is the only option I should consider, did they make the type I'm after (SS, short barrel, 45-70) before quality went downhill?

Yes, they did...

However, if you can actually touch a Remlin in your local gun store, and cycle dummy cartridges through it, and look it over carefully for fit and finish, and verify that the barrel is not canted, and...You get the idea...

I would not hesitate to buy new IF I could put it under MY microscope in my hands before buying...

I would be very leery of anything online I can not touch, at least for the time being...

Jacob L Freeman
May 14, 2012, 07:56 AM
Thank you. I think I will likely look for a newish used Conneticut made gun then. And I may add some more vintage guns to my collection as well. I am not enough of an expert to examine a new rifle for defects. It's a shame that two of the most iconic American rifle manufacturers have gone downhill, but.... I suppose I can always just hope they turn around.

Panzercat
May 14, 2012, 08:11 AM
The Mossberg 464 is a patterned loosely off the 94. Early iterations had extractor issues, but that problem has been weeded out as I hear. And they're cheaper. Test drive one of those :)

Ah, but only in 30-30 so far. Sorry :(

Sav .250
May 14, 2012, 08:11 AM
You can my used, older Marlin 336's all day long. Go that route.
As stated, take your time and look around for a used one.

DPris
May 14, 2012, 11:58 AM
Quality began to go downhill the last year of the Connecticut plant's operation & BEFORE Remington bought the company.
It got markedly worse with the new factory production, Remington underestimated the complexity of manufacture.

Over the past several months Remington made a sizable investment in new machinery & training, and the goal was to "make the best Marlins ever".
QC has been improving, I saw mixed results at their SHOT Show booth in Vegas in January, and the 3-phase plan was supposed to be complete by now.
I have not looked at any personally since then.

Buying a Connecticut gun is no guarantee. The last year of production suffered, as mentioned, and you may not be able to determine old vs new production anyway because the new guns at Ilion were built using remaining barrels from the old factory with the old JM stamping until they ran out.

You best bet in a new one, as mentioned above, is to check it out thoroughly in your own hands. Look at wood to metal fit, cycle the action, if at all possible cycle a couple rounds to check feeding & ejection, look for canted sights, and so on.

Denis

1858
May 14, 2012, 02:29 PM
Buying a Connecticut gun is no guarantee.

I agree.

I have four Marlins all with the JM barrel stamp rather than the newer REP stamp but both '94s had to go back to Marlin for various issues. The Cowboy Ltd in .45 Colt had a severely scored barrel the whole length of one of the grooves and a broken stock. The .357 Mag (stainless) had a scored barrel on the outside. Both of my '95s were perfect and Marlin CS (prior to the FG buyout) was outstanding.

zeke
May 14, 2012, 08:38 PM
Just sent back a 336 compact. The chamber was scored so bad it stuck the action on 4 out of 20 rounds. The forearm instantly loosened up, which has a serious affet on accuracy.

Have sent back a 1894 32-20 several years before Rem took them over. Marlins didn't have a real good track record with QC over the last couple of years to begin with. And yes i got more than a couple of em.

greyling22
May 14, 2012, 08:52 PM
I tried 3 of the 1894 stainless 357's. they were all junk and went back. crooked barrels and sights, stripped screws, rough rough actions, very gappy all around. If they start making the best marlin's ever I'll buy 2. in the meantime I'll keep my old ones.

If you're going to shoot recreationally can I suggest something less punchy and expensive to feed than a 45/70? something in pistol caliber perhaps?

ExAgoradzo
May 14, 2012, 08:54 PM
My 1895 is fine. I got to hold it before I bought it about 2 months ago. RM stamp on it...

Tophernj
May 15, 2012, 06:24 AM
I just took my new "Remlin" out to the range yesterday. It's the 1894C. I have to say that aside from some clunkiness that I know will smooth out, it's fantastic. Only problem I am having is that I now want to own more of them!!

C

Beak50
May 15, 2012, 08:01 AM
You would think that the company would have gotten their quality control issue under control as soon as it surfaced poor management in my opinion.Didn't Remington just get a contract for the AR type rifle?I hope they don't put out junk for our troops.

DPris
May 15, 2012, 01:02 PM
Remington didn't realize what they'd gotten into when they moved the guns from Conn to New York.
It didn't help that the former Marlin employees did not move with the equipment.
They had new people trying to build guns on old equipment, and it got to the point where Remington had to suspend production of several models while reassessing the situation, and working out the new equipment and training.
Denis

JohnBT
May 15, 2012, 04:12 PM
www.marlinowners.com/forum/marlin-rant-forum/

There are some reports of functional guns turning up. But lots of good reading with posts by former employees.

dugasgunner
May 15, 2012, 10:04 PM
Have you looked at HENRY??

Sheepdog1968
May 16, 2012, 01:21 AM
Yes mine was. I posted details in 336 thread. Not that long ago I wrote a letter to Rem and in doing so I think the tally was eight defects that if I could have inspected prior to purchase I would have passed on it.

Ridgerunner665
May 16, 2012, 01:53 AM
Rossi...

Captain33036
May 16, 2012, 10:16 AM
I got a new "remlin" Marlin 1894C a few months ago and am very happy with it.

I ordered from a dealer on GB and took the time to inspect the rifle carefully before accepting it at my FFL. Fit and finish were very good, no gaps in the wood fit to the stock, sights in correct alignment, metal work very good, no stripped screws, action smooth. All the things I read about on the net that people had been complaining about. Most, if not all, seemed cosmetic (at least for the 1894C).

Shooting was a dream. Incredibly accurate. No issues at all.

Not sure if I got lucky, but, I hope it was careful inspection that proved important.

Wouldn't you carefully inspect ANY gun you were about to purchse.

And...it is my impression...please correct me if I am wrong...that you CAN inspect an arm purhased and shipped to your FFL and if not satisfied...NOT accept it? It then is not a sale and you do not have to pay??

Thanks

J

Salmoneye
May 16, 2012, 10:19 AM
And...it is my impression...please correct me if I am wrong...that you CAN inspect an arm purhased and shipped to your FFL and if not satisfied...NOT accept it? It then is not a sale and you do not have to pay??

Depends on the seller...

dubya450
May 17, 2012, 03:27 AM
If you happen to live in Minnesota the cabelas in Rogers has two or three LNIB used pre-remington marlin 45-70 guide guns (I think they're guide guns) in the brown laminate for under $500 in very good shape. I almost left with one but my girlfriend was with me and i didn't have an excuse off the top of my head lol.

Sheepdog1968
May 17, 2012, 12:22 PM
My local gun store was special ordering it for me and their policy is such that you can't reject it. Theymaremgood to me in general and I can't fault the policy. I'd likelyndonthe same if I ran a store. Rather than send it back to Remington to get fixed I opted to send it to someone whos specializes in lever actions so it would definitely get fixed.

If I had to do it over I would have bought a used one.

valnar
May 17, 2012, 12:35 PM
Since the Remlin employees are also the Remington employees, is there any reason to suspect that Remington brand quality has also gone down?

PR-NJ
May 17, 2012, 01:15 PM
Since the Remlin employees are also the Remington employees, is there any reason to suspect that Remington brand quality has also gone down?
Good point. I don't see much news about 870s being POS's. They still seem to be the consumate pump shotgun.

valnar
May 17, 2012, 03:05 PM
Well, I have read bad things about the 870 Express....

northark147
May 18, 2012, 08:49 AM
I don't know for sure, but I don't want to find out. I'm hunting for a pre Remington 35 Remington (if that makes any sense.. lol) Oh well sooner or later I will find one.

DPris
May 18, 2012, 02:32 PM
Remington quality in rifles has been variable for several years, shotguns (aside from the Express models) are still generally pretty good.
Denis

shootr
May 19, 2012, 07:28 AM
Well I was sure sad to see Cerberus get in the game with Rem and Marlin. Lucky to have acquired 70s & 80s era 336s.

Googleplex
May 20, 2012, 12:06 AM
I have an used marlin 1895 guide gun from 2008 (after the FGI takeover, but before the New Haven closing) that I got for $550. Spectacular rifle worth every penny. It has an after market trigger and a limbsaver pad, and these are wise investments, but likely not mandatory with normal trap-door safe loads. If you get buffalo bore or garret cartridges ammunition, then you might want that limbsaver, but the marlin 1895 is a great gun and inexpensive. You can find several on gunbroker. Aviod rifles that start with an MR in their serial number. 2009 manufacture rifles can also be questionable, as that's when the situation at marlin started to become really apparent to employees, from what I hear. If you take the first two digets of the serial number and subtract them from 100, you have the year made. For example serial number 92######### would be made in 2008. Serial number 24############ would be made in 1976.

red rick
May 20, 2012, 12:08 PM
Thanks, that's good to know.

BoneDigger
May 20, 2012, 12:14 PM
I have a Marlin 336 bought new in 2010 from WalMart that is an exceptional shooter and no issues at all. I have killed many a hog with it. I also own two Marlin XS7 rifles and both are very good. Again, no issues with either.

Todd


Sent via Todd's IPhone using Tapatalk.

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