Rust Prevention Tests: Found 2, any others? + Other tips


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wacki
May 29, 2012, 12:40 AM
What's the best in rust prevention? Feel free to make comments/suggestions on any category listed below.

Rust Prevention Products vs. Salt Tests:

This test Shows Eezox (link (http://www.eezox.com/)) as the clear winner with corrosion-x 2nd. Break free is 3rd.http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html
Eezox & Break Free win here:http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html


Any other tests?

Here's an old (2008) but good thread (http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/index.php/t-386897.html) which I've summarized:


DO's
CLP (clean lube Protect)

Eezox
M-Pro7 (no test data available)
Boeshield T-9 (no test data available)
Corrosion-X
Balistol [PDF (http://www.ballistol.com/1_Ballistol%202010%20Amazing%20Story%20Flyer%20PROOF3.pdf)]


Home remedy

90wt gear oil
lithium grease
Wax. Car paste wax, RenWax, Commercial floor wax., Johnson's Paste Wax
Silicone Spray
Petroleum Jelly


Military

cosmoline



Dessicants

Pelican 1500D
Hydrosorbent OSG-40 - Cobalt Free (pelican knock off?!?!)
Kitty Litter (it's just cheap silica gel)
(store:carries wide range of desiccants Texas Technologies (http://www.texastechnologies.com/site/index.php/moisture-corrosion-control/desiccants-and-adsorbents.html))


Moisture Barriers

Bags that prevent moisture (store (http://www.texastechnologies.com/site/index.php/moisture-corrosion-control/moisture-barrier-bags.html))
Pelican case might work here. It's not foolproof but it's certainly better than nothing


Cloth/Bag

Synthetic / Silicon cloth bags like Bore-Stores won't absorb moisture



Refinish

http://www.ccrrefinishing.com/
Gun-kote
Dura-kote
Cerakote


Dont's:

Lay guns on leather, foam, or other moisture absorbing material. Basically your average gun case and carrier is bad.








.

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jhco50
May 29, 2012, 01:19 AM
Under home remedies you list auto paste wax. Don't use the past wax unless you are positive they don't have the grit in them. Better is the auto liquid waxes like 2000 Washes or Nu-Finish.

303tom
May 29, 2012, 09:40 AM
Grease.........

BCRider
May 29, 2012, 10:50 AM
Just a note on the "soft" stuff like gun cases. The moisture issues only occur when the environment alters the temperature a lot when the air is humid. When that happens you get dew forming in the materials which then acts on the steel surfaces. Those of us living in less humid conditions simply are not going to see rust issues even from storing our guns right in a soft wrap or gun case. Folks near oceans or in well known highly humid areas is another issue.

Add one more oil to the "home remedies". Canola cooking oil. I use it for some cases on my black powder guns FOR SHORT TERM USE ONLY. Testing with it on some bare steel samples showed me that it prevented rusting even better than Breakfree CLP, automotive engine oil, WD40 (threw it in to see if it is as bad as everyone says) and a raw control piece. The Canola actually beat out the rest up to the point it turned into a varnish under the heat and light of the direct sunlight. So it is not a long term solution due to this. But testing with it kept in the dark and in a cool area did not see any noticable gumming up even after two months. So for swabbing down a BP gun for temporary protection for a week or two between shoots it's fine.

On a day of actual shooting I found that the Canola breaks down and frees up BP fouling on my revolvers similarly to how a good CLP oil works on smokeless fouling in modern style guns.

For longer times between shoots I use Ballistol on my BP guns. Which is another oil known to be BP friendly.

I found out recently that Canola oil (it's an oil derived from rape seed) was used on steam engine valving during the last war and perhaps from earlier times as well.

jcwit
May 29, 2012, 11:46 AM
Under home remedies you list auto paste wax. Don't use the past wax unless you are positive they don't have the grit in them. Better is the auto liquid waxes like 2000 Washes or Nu-Finish.

Just a note "Nu-Finish" contains abrasive polish.

kris7047th
May 29, 2012, 11:55 AM
Rig Rag ??

holdencm9
May 29, 2012, 04:36 PM
Anyone heard of, or tried anti-corrosion emitters from VCI? I received one of these small round emitters from a vendor at an engineering conference, figured why not? Put it in my safe. No rust on any of my guns, but then again, my anti-tiger rock has also proven 100% effective so far.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=59367&cat=1,43326
http://www.safepack.com/catalog/PDS/SP-MDE.pdf

oneounceload
May 29, 2012, 05:04 PM
Kitty litter is NOT silica gel - it is either clay, bentonite or diatomaceous earth

Don't forget to include WD-40 - while a water displacement, this displacement has shown to be a proven rust preventative

Powerglide
May 29, 2012, 07:43 PM
If you are concerned with storage in a cloth or leather gun case, just leave the end open a bit.Never had a problem assuming I did my pre-storage wipe down.

bergmen
May 29, 2012, 07:44 PM
Dont's:

Lay guns on leather, foam, or other moisture absorbing material. Basically your average gun case and carrier is bad.


I've seen this several times before and I disagree. I have kept firearms in foam lined cases and regular canvas gun cases with fleece lining since the 1960's with zero problems with rust.

The ONLY time I have encountered any rust was when I was young and stupid and didn't wipe my fingerprints off with an oily rag after handling them.

I have guns over fifty years old that look brand new.

I DO live in California (over 50 miles from the sea coast) which is a dry climate and that may be the key. If it is, climate conditions need to be a part of any suggestions for rust prevention (including proximity to a sea coast).

Dan

wacki
May 29, 2012, 11:34 PM
I've seen this several times before and I disagree. I have kept firearms in foam lined cases and regular canvas gun cases with fleece lining since the 1960's with zero problems with rust.

The ONLY time I have encountered any rust was when I was young and stupid and didn't wipe my fingerprints off with an oily rag after handling them.

I have guns over fifty years old that look brand new.

I DO live in California (over 50 miles from the sea coast) which is a dry climate and that may be the key. If it is, climate conditions need to be a part of any suggestions for rust prevention (including proximity to a sea coast).

Dan

I'm glad you realize that you are in a dry climate. You could probably do whatever you wanted with your guns and you'd be OK. My friend in Connecticut refuses to touch his guns unless he's wearing nitrile gloves and he's still got rust issues with his Vietnam era rifle. His newer production pistols have held up well though. Everything is stored 1st floor in a gun cases. The slowly rusting rifle is in a foam case and wrapped in canvas.

My evidence is of course anecdotal and if I had the resources (and location) I'd do a series of experiments. As of right now all I know what he's doing isn't working and he's pretty OCD with stuff.

wacki
May 29, 2012, 11:42 PM
Kitty litter is NOT silica gel -it is either clay, bentonite....

Clear Choice Silica Crystals for $2 a pound
http://www.amazon.com/Clear-Choice-Crystals-Pail-12-Pound/dp/B0002ML1OK

That said, bentonite isn't that far behind silica gel as a desiccant. A google search on Amazon reveals the purpose built stuff is about

$10 a pound
http://www.amazon.com/Packs-Loose-Silica-White-Non-Indicating/dp/B001UYNQAG

$14 / pound with the orange/green indicator stuff
http://www.amazon.com/Dry-Packs-Silica-Indicating-Desiccant/dp/B001UYYL82/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_img_b

Gotta wonder how pure the kitty litter is.

tarakian
May 30, 2012, 09:14 AM
Kitty litter is NOT silica gel - it is either clay, bentonite or diatomaceous earth

Actually, Fresh Step Crystals kitty litter is silica gel.

ZCORR Jay
May 30, 2012, 10:38 AM
If you want to avoid greases and oils you can look into VCI bags.

VCI molecules protect metal surfaces by basically creating a shield preventing any corrosive elements and once the metal is removed from the bag the molecules dissipate and leave no residue behind. The military has been using VCI materials since WWII so it's no new technology but it is extremely effective and efficient.
http://i806.photobucket.com/albums/yy346/ZCORRJay/VCIHIWcopy-1.jpg

Let me know if you want me to post more info on this method.

788Ham
May 30, 2012, 10:47 AM
The best item I've read about, and used, is "Renaissance Wax." This wax is used by many of the top museum's for metal preservation, NRA museum uses it, plus many of the top Museums in Europe!

holdencm9
May 30, 2012, 11:55 AM
ZCORR Jay,

Did you see my links about the Safepack VCI Emitters? They allegedly last for 2 years and the small one can provide rust protection for up to 5 cubic feet. I got one as a freebie awhile back. It is only 2.25" in diameter and 3/4" thick, and has some adhesive backing, so I just stuck it on the inside wall of my safe. It is probably past its 2-year lifetime by now. But for only 8 bucks I am tempted to order a few more. In any case I'd be interested in learning more.

rajb123
May 30, 2012, 02:46 PM
I used car wax paste for 40 years until I had one gun I left on a wood floor under a bed got rust on the barrel. I now use a oily spray goo for firearms and locks that I buy at Home Depo.

I get a lot of humidity in summer months - NY.

The rust was removed with 1000 steel wool.....

Pat M
May 30, 2012, 06:26 PM
I'm a big fan of Beeman MP5 metalophillic oil. I wipe all of my guns down with a thin layer as the humid months set in (now).

pat701
May 30, 2012, 06:47 PM
mobil 5w/30 3 parts & one part automatic transmiion fluid. No rust in transmittions.

valnar
May 30, 2012, 07:48 PM
I use Weapon Shield for my CLP. I believe it fares well against Breakfree and Eezox, but I can't remember where I saw a semi-official test.

I've read a lot of good about Renaissance wax on the military surplus forums, and I might give that a try.

oneounceload
May 30, 2012, 09:00 PM
Non-clumping conventional litter

One of the first commercially available cat litters was Kitty Litter, available in 1948 and marketed by Ed Lowe. This was the first large scale use of clay (in the form of Fuller's earth) in litter boxes; previously sand was used. Clay litter is much more absorbent than sand, and its larger grain makes it less likely to be tracked from the litter box. The brand name Kitty Litter has become a genericized trademark,[where?] used by many to denote any type of cat litter. Today, cat litter can be obtained quite economically at a variety of retail stores, including "dollar" retail outlets. Conventional clay litter is indistinguishable from clay-based oil absorbent (used to clean oil spills); as the latter is far less expensive, it is often used as a substitute. Non-clumping cat litter is often made of zeolite, diatomite and sepiolite.

The cat-box that the litter is poured into can give off a dreadful odor. It is recommended that it is kept in an area in the home that is not often used, such as a basement or laundry room. There are special types of litter to cover or lessen the odor. They contain baking soda and/or odorized crystals. If kept in room with an intake vent, an air freshener may be added on the furnace filter to isolate the odor from the rest of the house.
Clumping litter
Close up of cat litter

Litter clumps were first developed in the UK in the 1950s by the Fuller's Earth Union (FEU), later to become a part of Laporte Industries Ltd. The type of clumping litter developed by the FEU was calcium bentonite, a less swelling and less sticky type than American bentonite. Subsequently in America, clumping bentonite was developed in 1984 by biochemist Thomas Nelson. Most are made from granulated bentonite clay which clumps together when wet and forms a solid mass separate from the other litter in the box. This solid clumped material can be scooped out and disposed of without changing the entire contents of the litter box.

Clumping litter usually also contains quartz or diatomaceous earth (sometimes called diatomaceous silica, which causes it to be mistakenly confused with silica gel litter). Because of the clumping effect, the manufacturers usually instruct not to flush clumping litters down the toilet, because it could clog it.[1]

Clumping clay cat litters also contain crystalline silica, or silica dust, which in California is treated as a known carcinogen under Proposition 65.[2] Clay litter is also criticized by the more expensive manufacturers of non-clay litter as being commonly produced in a strip mine in an environmentally degrading process.[3]

Nevertheless, while a nice absorbent, it is not the best for rust prevention

MEHavey
May 30, 2012, 09:15 PM
Folks might want to look into WeaponShield:
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2910945&postcount=20

I used BreakFree as the ultimate cat's meow from `81 until just two years ago, so I'm not one to flit from one fad to another.
But WeaponShield is "it" at this point.

merrill
May 31, 2012, 12:11 AM
The best dessicant I have found is calcium chloride. You can get it at most auto parts stores. Look for a product called Driveway Heat. Put a can of it in your gun safe and it will absorb water from the air eventually becoming liquified. Throw it out and replace with fresh. I use it for my photographic equiptment which I keep in a cooler. I used it as a drying agent when Itook analytical chemistry.

clamman
June 1, 2012, 10:24 AM
I keep a 1911 hidden under my work bench out in the shop. No matter what I use, it rusts. I started lightly wrapping a dish rag around it sprayed with CLP. No more rust.

wacki
June 5, 2012, 02:25 AM
Interesting perspective on Eezox vs others:

Eezox is a fantastic rust preventer, decent cleaner, and an OK lube. It is a diester based lube that forms a wax like coating after the solvent evaporates. I used to use it some and liked it overall except for the STRONG fumes that come from the solvent. I still use it on some safe queens.

WS is a much better lube and cleaner. The results of informal "tests" on line have shown it to be a good rust fighter as well.
The biggest thing about WS is the ease of cleaning from its use. The more you use it, the easier cleaning becomes. Junk just doesn't stick and guns seem to get less dirty in the first place.
Has a nice cinnamon smell and contains NO solvents. It's about all I use now for my shooters.

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1303333

JustinJ
June 5, 2012, 09:04 AM
I've always been happy with Birchwood Casey Barricade. According to their ads it "withstands 500 hours in ASTM humidity test and 96 hours in ASTM salt spray test" but I've never been able to find docs verifying this.

C0untZer0
June 5, 2012, 09:49 AM
I started using Meguiar's Gold Class Carnauba Plus Paste Wax for the exterior of the slide. Meguiar's Gold Class Carnauba Plus Paste Wax is fairly oily, it also is PH neutral and has no abrasives in it.

I waxed the slide on my G34 and I like it. It is easier to cycle the slide than if it had a light coat of oil on it. And it's more protected than if the slide were wiped completely dry.

The way I do this though is that I put a light coat of fairly thick oil on it first. I use Halvoline SAE 50 on the outside of the slide - just basically wiping down the slide with it. Then I wrap the pistol in cloth and let it sit over night. The next day I give it a wipe down with a dry cloth so I can't see the oil. The oil is still there... you can smell it and you can feel it with your fingers... it is in the pores of the finish. But anyway, then I apply the wax. The wax takes longer to dry because it's not being applied to a painted surface with a clear coat finish - it's being applied to a surface that's been oiled. So anyway the wax probably takes three times as long to dry as it would on a car, but it does dry. maybe the wax is acting as a wick to evaporate the chemicals in the oil that would dry up over time - I don't know. But anyway, I then polish it out with a cotton cloth and my slide has a fairly hydrophobic coating on top of the gun's finish.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=165738&stc=1&d=1338904143
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=165737&stc=1&d=1338904143

C0untZer0
June 5, 2012, 12:06 PM
Under home remedies you list auto paste wax. Don't use the past wax unless you are positive they don't have the grit in them. Better is the auto liquid waxes like 2000 Washes or Nu-Finish.

I did call Meguiar's and they confirmed that Gold Class Carnauba Plus Paste Wax has a neutral PH and no abrasives

wacki
June 17, 2012, 11:55 PM
If i was going to run my own tests... what steel best mimics popular firearms?

ColtPythonElite
June 18, 2012, 12:07 AM
A Glock slide needs next to nothing to prevent rust. I'e carried one a duty weapon for 13 years and don't put anything on it and have never had rust.

As far as wax goes Johnsons paste wax is hard to beat on wood and metal.

wacki
July 1, 2012, 04:36 PM
Carnuba is the hardest natural wax. What's the best synthetic?

Also, any waxes out there that produce a matte finish? Seems like all the waxes go for super-glossy which is fine for cars... not so much for guns.

oldbear
July 1, 2012, 04:45 PM
I've owned and stored handguns over 40 years now and I've only had a rust problems with one, an early Dan Wesson, so I'm not sure that counts.

I clean them well after every use, lite oil, wipe down with clean cotton cloth, then place in a silicon treated storage bag. depending on the amount of use each revolver receives it gets two thin coats of Johnson's and Johnson's paste wax once or twice a year. The wax keeps them looking nice and offers protection to the exterior surfaces.

My "ready revolvers" get a wipe down after every handling.

floorit76
July 1, 2012, 04:59 PM
"The best dessicant I have found is calcium chloride. "

You might mention that calcium chloride is corosive if exposed directly to metal. Especially when in liquid form.

zenner22
July 2, 2012, 10:55 AM
I am in the northeast and have had guns rust sitting in foam cases. One sat in a foam case for about 6-8 months and the cylinder was badly rusted where it contacted the foam. I don't do that anymore.

I was thinking about how to store without metal touching the foam and the obvious answer struck me. Guns are shipped from the factory in their cases. The pistols themselves are in plastic bags.

I started wiping them down with Breakfree (pretty much all I use), put them in ziploc bags inside the pistol cases and never had a problem since.

Knew there had to be a reason they shipped in plastic bags. Sometimes the answer is right under your nose...

Old Fuff
July 2, 2012, 12:11 PM
That isn't good! Under some circumstances you can get condensed moisture trapped in the bag. Manufacturers usually warp the gun in a piece of Vapor Inhibitor Paper (VIP), and put the gun in a plastic bag.

However do not use VIP on nickel or other plated handguns, and it is advisable to remove and wrap plastic, antique hard rubber, ivory, pearl, and some light wood stocks separately.

VIP can be obtained from www.brownells.com

zenner22
July 2, 2012, 01:00 PM
I've only seen S&W use the paper instead of a plastic bag. I'm sure other companies use it too, I haven't seen them however. Most of the pistols I buy they come in plastic bags inside the case.

I have not had a problem in 10 years using the plastic bag method, but I do understand your concerns. People should be made aware of potential dangers of any storage method.

I also use Bore Stores silicon pouches for storage. Been using them for about 5-7 years and again, so far, no troubles.

Old Fuff
July 2, 2012, 03:06 PM
A lot depends on where you store your guns. If the temperature is stable you may (or may not) be safe from condensed moisture. But if for whatever reason it should go from cold to warm condensation may form on the metal, and be trapped in the bag. The VIP wrap is an insurance against this as it releases a gas that protects the metal.

With or without a VIP element, another good practice is to wrap the gun in a plastic bag and then use one of those machines designed to vacuum pack food to draw out the air and then seal the bag. No air = no condensation.

I have refinished guns that badly rusted after they’re owners stored them in sealed plastic bags, especially in a motor vehicle.

HEAVY METAL 1
July 4, 2012, 11:12 AM
"The best dessicant I have found is calcium chloride.... it will absorb water from the air eventually becoming liquified. "

I used that once & it caused me GREAT GRIEF! The crystals expanded, overflowed the container, spilling its contents on a couple of guns & the side of the metal cabinet & rust set in big time. It absorbes moisture very well indeed, but if it so much as touches your guns you will have rust. I made the mistake of putting the container on a shelf in my cabinet because if I put it on the floor I might knock it over:banghead:. I use golden rod dehumidifiers and canned dessicants sold for gun cabinets only (in addition to oil rub downs as discussed above).

Well Now
July 4, 2012, 11:25 AM
http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f35/rust-protection-fluid-film-vs-xf7-vs-wd-40-a-38007/

jcwit
July 4, 2012, 03:12 PM
As Well Now showes Fluid Film is an excellant product for rust prevention and alsp for stopping rust. I believe is was first developed for the marine industry. For those wishing to buy it and try some, John Deelers usually have it or can get it. Its available in spray cans, quarts, gallons, and drums. I use is as a rust preventive on my autos, super product and highly recommended.

merrill
July 5, 2012, 01:06 AM
Calcium chloride is corrosive to metals. The idea is to keep it off of your guns. As a dessicant, it is hard to beat. A little caution is indicated when using it. I use it to store my cameras and lenses and fill a plastic container about 1/2 full, but to each his own.

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