I think I've changed my philosophy


PDA






Skribs
June 1, 2012, 03:27 PM
My philosophy regarding what guns I want has changed over the past few years. It could be that I'm young and fickle, it could be that I've learned and grown wiser...either way, its changed. I was just wondering how others have changed, or what others think of how I've changed. Ready for a ramble? Here goes:

I used to want a large variety of guns and calibers, so that I could have a lot of options available to me when I decide to carry or what to grab in a HD situation. For me, personally, all my guns are for self defense (and practice). I don't do competition, I don't want a plinking-only gun, I don't hunt, I don't collect (well, I was planning on a collection that fit within my other criteria), and I don't do long-distance target shooting. I simply practice and plan for SD.

My original plan, before I even purchased a firearm, was to have a lot of different styles of a lot of different calibers. After picking the criteria I wanted for a self defense pistol, I realized I'd rather have one basic style (DA or striker-fired), and my philosophy evolved. However, I still liked the idea of having multiple calibers available to me, for everything from .380 ACP to .45 ACP (and maybe even get that Glock with the .50 GI conversion).

Over the past week, however, I started thinking...why would I need both a 9 and a .45 in the same model? If I were to only grab one in self defense, shouldn't I already know ahead of time what to grab? Shouldn't I know, in the dark, which one I'm pulling out of the gunvault multi? I also came to the conclusion that I don't really need as big a variety of platforms.

My new philosophy is, then, that I will get options with only a limited amount of variability. For handguns, one caliber for social work against 2-legged predators, one caliber for woods work against 4-legged predators, both in semi-auto. For shotguns, specifically 12-gauge tube-fed shotguns...in fact I think I may already have all the shotguns I need (may get a Saiga, who knows). For rifles, I think I'll end up settling on 6.8mm once I get one, and then only get one or two instead of the several I was planning on.

Granted, some of this change is based on some guns that weren't available when I was looking at it 3 years ago, specifically in regards to pocket pistols.

In the end, this will save me money (because my collection will be smaller), and I think aid in training and practice. I guess I'm approaching the "be afraid of the man who has only one gun" ideology slowly. Of course, I never will have "one gun" (I believe that a pocket pistol for BUG or EDC, a handgun for night stand/carry, and a rifle OR a shotgun is the minimum I want), but I am approaching that point.

What is still kinda unclear to me, based on my new philosophy, is whether I need a pump-action shotgun when I have a semi-auto (instead of having 2 semi-autos to have a backup) and whether I need both a rifle and a shotgun if I'm only going for one long gun in SD. Anyway, just my musings as I look back on where I was 3 years ago and where I am now, as far as my personal wishlist is concerned.

If you enjoyed reading about "I think I've changed my philosophy" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
MrDig
June 1, 2012, 03:52 PM
My change has been more towards quality. Having fired a few revolvers I am more inclined towards my Ruger GP100 or my S&W Model 10. My preference for Browning Hi-Power 9 mm is well known.
I own a Benelli Montefeltro 12 gauge. But for HD I would grab one of my Mossberg 500 12 gauge, I may also grab my KelTec P11 9mm mostly because if I am involved in a shooting giving a 250.00 gun to the police for custody is better than giving them one of the High Powers or the Montefeltro that can cost close to a 1000.00 to replace. I know that I can't trust evidence lock up to care for my firearms as I would, there for I'll give them an inexpensive one to treat like crap. That way if I don't get it back or I get it back unusable I'm not out much if I have to replace them.

Skribs
June 1, 2012, 04:01 PM
if I am involved in a shooting giving a 250.00 gun to the police for custody is better than giving them one of the High Powers or the Montefeltro that can cost close to a 1000.00 to replace. I know that I can't trust evidence lock up to care for my firearms as I would, there for I'll give them an inexpensive one to treat like crap. That way if I don't get it back or I get it back unusable I'm not out much if I have to replace them.

I don't really own anything expensive, and when I do it will simply be because the AR is that expensive, but I see your philosophy.

My philosophy on purchasing anything (guns, computer parts, food, clothing, etc) has always been the same. Some people shop for the best deals (Taurus), some people want name brands (Baer), I want something that offers the best price for the quality and features I need, or the most cost-effective if I did not have any preset parameters.

HGUNHNTR
June 1, 2012, 04:50 PM
I have gone through a similar phase. As I have grown up, I've figured out that the difference between a 45 and a 9mm isn't enough to justify countless hours of internet research. I probably own 8% of the guns I once did, and feel that I am much more streamlined and sensible in my selection. Basically I no longer wanted all of the variety I once had, and really enjoy the simplicity of my new set up. This is subject to change however...:)

Skribs
June 1, 2012, 04:56 PM
Well, I don't have that big of a collection yet (just the 5), more of a wish list. And it is changing...unfortunately 3 of my 5 no longer fit what I want with my new philosophy (based on platform or caliber). Oh well; as I replace them with something that does, I can either sell them or give them to family/friends as a gift.

Jetplane19
June 1, 2012, 06:08 PM
This thread is interesting to me because I too am just about at the 3yr mark when I got my first pistol.

I jumped into this world wanting 1 of everything.
3yr later, and many buys + sells later, I've learned a lot, changed many views I once had, and have pretty much settled on this philosophy:

**I will not accept poor quality for SD. My once-loved thin/light/cheap carry gun broke at the range. Not acceptable. I carry a $500 gun instead of a $250 gun, sacrificing a bit of weight in the process. I will not carry a $1500 gun [often] for the reason stated above (in case the cops must take it).

**It is OK to have a safe-queen. My expensive-to-me 1911 is worth owning just because I care about higher-end things, and adore this piece of artwork from Dan W...and it shoots like a dream.

**Buy an AK or something along those lines now so the grand-kids I'll hopefully have in 30 years will be able to have it. Because by then, I'm pretty sure an AK will no longer be legal for purchase in the USA.

**Reloading is good. Collect brass, run a progressive press in bulk, stockpile the ammo. Run a single-stage for expensive rifle ammo for accuracy and lower cost. It is a good skill to learn.

**Own the caliber(s) that is/are accurate for YOU. Not the one that creates the bigger hole.

**"Tactical" is funny. C'mon, no need to walk around the house with a molle vest & thigh-rig. Live your normal yuppie / homeboy / hillbilly lifestyle, and pack your heat in comfort....and >>be prepared<< by having the essentials packed up properly, out of sight.

**Once a sensible arsenal of guns is obtained, use fun-money for other important means. Lots and lots of dollars are better used on a backup generator, gasoline, stacks of cash stashed away, or converted to silver rounds or junk silver, college fund, etc. Put extra money to use elsewhere.

**I won't drag my kids to the range and drill him on all the rules; rather I'll wait until they ask. Let them dig in the dirt and play light-sabers instead. Teach them the rules at home in a fun environment. Let the kids hold a safety-checked gun...feel the heft of it...lose any curiosity at an early age. They might find one under a bed when playing hide-n-go-seek at a friend's house someday.

OK, I'm getting off track.
Bottom line for me, is that I have lessened my priorities on quantity, focused on quality, don't go over-the-top with crazy high-end stuff, and stopped being so serious (except for the safety part).

Old judge creek
June 1, 2012, 06:21 PM
Any of us whose opinions/philosophy on firearms has NOT changed over the years simply is NOT paying attention to what's going on or learning any lessons at all...

Period!!

I'm still learning and re-evaluating what I know (or think I know) in the light of new information and very real practical experience nearly every day... and I'll be 70 on my birthday and have been a shooter since I was six years old.

Nothing ever stays the same... dangit! :banghead:

(old farts don't like having to adapt to change)

Dr T
June 1, 2012, 06:44 PM
Beware the man with only one gun. It is likely that he knows how to use it.

It is likely that in a home defense situation that you will not have the luxury of time to ponder that whether the 9 or the 45 would be the best one to shoot at the home invader that is breaking down the door. In that case, settle on one thing and learn to use it well.

That is not to say that I am opposed to building a collection. I have been doing it for over 30 years. It is driven by the tastes I acquired while young and shaped by recent changes in technology. However, my collection is my toy chest. My using guns are in my collection; however, I have taken care to become proficient with them.

So my advice is that for specific purposes it is better to be very good with a few things rather than marginal with a bunch of things. To learn how to shoot a handgun or rifle, get a 22 similar in configuration to what you think you really need in a pinch and put a couple or three thousand rounds through it (I used to go through about 500 rounds a month when I was 10 or 12 years old). As you get older and have stable finances that will allow to you buy and keep, start building the collection you dreamed about when you were younger.

At least, that is what I did.

Badlander
June 1, 2012, 07:26 PM
I have gotten to where I only have (want) 1911 .45cal autos and Smith and wesson revolvers. I have little interest in the new handguns being made. I still like A variety of rifles and calibers. I like my Leverguns best but still have what I consider more serious guns ARs, Fals, And long range Bolt actions.
I prefer common calibers for availability.

Skribs
June 1, 2012, 07:31 PM
Badlander, I'm the opposite for handguns. I want striker-fired 9s only for my pistols (I don't even have one of those yet, but after a pocket .380, a .357 revolver, and a pair of striker-fired .40s, that's what I figured I want).

Badlander
June 1, 2012, 07:40 PM
Skribs. I can't warm up to plastic guns with the funny triger. A friend recently bought A Glock 36. I can't say A bad thing about it. Shoots good. I just like guns made of steel.
Besides 9mm is for teaching women and children to shoot!
You do need A .357 revolver should be high on your list.

JohnBiltz
June 1, 2012, 08:14 PM
I'd say you have just learned, its the logical result of experience

HDCamel
June 2, 2012, 01:00 AM
I was decidedly anti-polymer (the ignorant "plastic breaks" type of anti-polymer) through most of middle and high school.
I still prefer wood and steel on an aesthetic level, but I don't have anything against polymer anymore.

Otherwise, the guns I want haven't really changed over the last 10 years and my go-to gun is my 1911 and it will continue to be that for the forseeable future.

Pilot
June 2, 2012, 08:37 AM
The cost of the gun I'd have to give to police after a legal shoot is the absolute last thing on my mind. The legal costs, potential job loss, unfair incarceration, or even wrongfull conviction are at the top of my lists. The tens of thousands of dollars or more you will spend in legal fees far outweighs the cost of the gun, ANY gun. Not to mention the horrible thought of having to end someone else's life.

If you enjoyed reading about "I think I've changed my philosophy" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!