My Experience with the PA State Police Over Memorial Day Weekend.


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ATBackPackin
June 3, 2012, 04:11 PM
I decided that I wanted to share my interaction with the PA State Police over Memorial Day weekend with everyone here at The High Road.

On Saturday while driving on the turnpike I passed an officer on the side of the road while speeding. He immediately pulled out and hit the lights, so without a doubt he was coming after me, I went ahead and pulled over. I was getting my license out when he walked up and checked my license plate, inspection stickers, and VIN. The officer finally approached my window and asked for my license, registration, and proof of insurance. I handed him my license, but said there was a problem with the registration and proof of insurance. I continued to explain that they were in the glove box and that I had a pistol in there as well. I stated that I didn't want him to walk up and see me reaching in there where there was also a pistol. I usually do not volunteer that I have a gun, but I didn't want to be seen reaching toward one and risk getting shot. He walked around to the passenger side of the car and pointed to the door. I responded that the door was unlocked thinking he was going to take possession of the gun. He told me to put the window down which I did and then waited for him to open the glove box to take possession of the gun. "Go ahead", he said. So very slowly I opened the glove box and with two fingers took the holstered gun and laid it the seat. I then retrieved the paperwork he wanted and handed it to him. He was standing in a defensive position with his hand on his gun while I did so, but did not seem threatened by me at all. Of course he had no reason to be but he did not know that. He did ask me if I had a LTCF (License To Carry Firearms), which I said yes and handed it to him. "I've been on the job for 25 years and usually have a good idea when someone wants to shoot me", he said. With the pistol still on the seat he told me that I was going to receive a citation and he would be back in about ten minutes.

He returned and said, "I cut you a break and gave you a citation for a turnpike violation instead of a speeding ticket. There are no points, no speed even indicated on the citation, and the fine is not as expensive as it would have been. Fair enough."

"More than fair sir", I said and thanked him. He explained what I needed to do to pay it and told me to be safe. I told him to be safe too and thanked him again.

My reason for sharing this is not that he cut me a break, but rather his complete professionalism throughout the interaction. He didn't act like a gun nut and ask me about my guns or anything like such. However, he also did not become all defensive and on edge after finding out I was armed. We often criticize LEO's and rightfully so sometimes, so I wanted to congratulate this officer and the PA State Police for his complete professionalism and not being threatened by an armed citizen.

If by chance he sees this, thanks again.

Shawn

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ByAnyMeans
June 3, 2012, 04:42 PM
Great to hear the story. What barracks was he from? I live in Monroe County and have had a few interactions with the Swiftwater officers. I have heard others had issues with them but they have never been anything but professional with me.


When I had just moved from Queens I got a flat on the 209/33 interchange. I had just bought the used car and while I made sure the spare tire was good I forgot to check for the jack. A officer pulled over while I was waiting for AAA. I was on the way to a gunsmith and had an AK and bolt action in the back seat. The AK was not in a case but just wrapped in a towel and had started poking out when I had pulled over. Needless to say having just moved from NYC I was not real sure how this would go. As he approached I informed him of the AK in the back seat and the pistol on my hip. He asked about my LTCF and after I responded yes and handed it to him not another word was said about it other than for him to say he "hoped I had an AR in the case for some balance." I told him "no" but there were some in the safe back home.

Told him the situation, he called the tow company to see how long it would take since I was in a bad spot of the road and then bs'd with me for ten minutes until they got there to jack the car. Really nice guy and the interaction gave me the assurance I made the right move getting out of NYC.

Owen Sparks
June 3, 2012, 04:49 PM
Sounds like you handeled it very well.

In the future you might not want to store your pistol and legal papers in the same location.

twofifty
June 3, 2012, 05:08 PM
Many decades ago, four of us teens in an out-of-state sub-compact were speeding on I-81 in mid-PA when we were pulled over, at night. Instead of a fat ticket the Trooper gave us a short calm lecture that stayed with me through decades and probably saved my life and that of others.

The officer took a few minutes to relate that a car like ours was a 70mph deathtrap if anything happened; that he was tired of prying dead youngsters from wrecked cars; and that we needed to smarten up and slow down, particularly on HIS section of I-81.

His message didn't turn me into an instant angel but it did bring about a permanent improvement in my driving behaviour.

Way to go PA !

leadcounsel
June 3, 2012, 05:20 PM
In my experience, which is minimal thankfully, most cops are VERY professional if you treat them with intellegence, courtesy, and respect.

I've had two interactions with Denver PD while I was committing traffic infractions, and never had issues. Told them I was armed both times, no issues.

Conversely, right after I came home from my 4th deployment to Iraq, I was speeding in California and the jerk California cop "cut me a break" when I was going like 15 over, so I didn't get a $650 ticket. He gave me 10 over, which is "only $250!!!" Wasn't armed in the Republik, so that wasn't even an issue...

ATBackPackin
June 3, 2012, 05:32 PM
Sounds like you handeled it very well.

In the future you might not want to store your pistol and legal papers in the same location.
Problem was rectified immediately afterward.

beatledog7
June 3, 2012, 05:57 PM
Good to hear a "LEO did right" story. We tend only to hear the "LEO did wrong" stories these days.

Regarding having both your pistol and your papers in the glovebox, I hope it was the pistol you moved. It's too far away over there.

Shadow 7D
June 3, 2012, 06:14 PM
Amazing what happens when you are civil,

BUT it is a two way street

Texan Scott
June 3, 2012, 06:17 PM
Know what? Cops are human, too. They have an oath to uphold, and a (largely ungrateful) public to protect, and a tough job. Some of 'em might just be jerks, but it's always a pleasure to meet or hear about one that wasn't. My job no longer carries possible death as a common job hazard, thank goodness; much respect to the men and women whose jobs still do.

BCCL
June 3, 2012, 06:31 PM
More often than not IME, the tone of most traffic stops are set by the attitude of the driver at that initial moment of contact at the window.

Good example here from both of you!

medalguy
June 3, 2012, 07:14 PM
I agree with this comment. ^^ I've been stopped a couple of times by Texas DPS officers because of my heavy foot. I always have my hands on the steering wheel, plainly visible, when the officer walks up to my car. I always greet him in a friendly manner and they usually ask if I know why I have been stopped, well duh, I answer I suppose I was going a little fast, no excuse. They ask for DL and insurance card, and I hand them my CHL on top of my DL and lastly the insurance card. Every time they have asked if I was armed, if so where was the gun (usually in the console) and they usually say to just leav it where it is. One asked what kind of gun I had and we discussed the merits of a 1911. I have never received a citation although I have gotten two warnings.

The officers have always been extremely courteous and polite, nothing else. Yes the tone is indeed set by the first couple of words exchanged.

Skribs
June 3, 2012, 07:35 PM
I can understand him keeping his hand on his gun, doesn't sound like he was freaked out - just cautious.

NavyLCDR
June 3, 2012, 07:45 PM
I've gotten stopped 5 times in Washington for speeding. 2 tickets, 3 warnings. Never had an officer even place his hand on his gun even though I had a pistol in the car, 4 of 5 times on my belt, 1 in the glove box. The one time in the glove box I had the folder with my papers out of the glove box and the glove box closed before even stopping. Firearms were never mentioned in any of my stops.

The solution to my problem: slow down! Which I have.

99% of police officers are good guys.

ATBackPackin
June 3, 2012, 07:54 PM
I can understand him keeping his hand on his gun, doesn't sound like he was freaked out - just cautious.
Absolutely, I was extremely shocked that he wanted me to move the gun in the first place. I was certain he was going to take it and unload it. I cannot fault him for taking a precaution.

This was the first time I have ever been stopped with a gun in the car other than on my body and in PA you do not have to notify. I don't volunteer the info because I don't want to put them on edge for no reason. So I was really uncertain how it was going to play out. Went really well and I have even been closely watching my speed since. LOL

Deltaboy
June 3, 2012, 08:35 PM
Good to hear this. !

danez71
June 3, 2012, 08:50 PM
Conversely, right after I came home from my 4th deployment to Iraq, I was speeding in California and the jerk California cop "cut me a break" when I was going like 15 over, so I didn't get a $650 ticket. He gave me 10 over, which is "only $250!!!" Wasn't armed in the Republik, so that wasn't even an issue...

To me, he sounds like a nice cop and not a "jerk" as you put it.

Ive only been pulled over in CA in my ~30 yrs of driving. Ive only received one warning and 4 tickets.

1 ticket was bogus. I wasnt passing over the double yellow. I was swerving out of the way of someone coming out onto the hwy and about to hit me. :fire:

1 ticket was sorta bogus. I changed lanes the last 25 feet before the red light to make a right turn. He wrote me for turning from a straight lane and should/could have wrote me up for changing lanes over a solid white. Oh well.

1 ticket was totally correct.

1 ticket I was doing 27 over the limit on a rural hwy with no one around but me... and the CHP :uhoh:

He wrote me for 25 over. It was less than the $650 noted above but I think anything 26+ over the limit can be considered 'reckless'.

The previous ticket before that was like 8-9 years prior so I think he cut me a break. The CHP (CA Hwy Patrol) are known to ticket their own retire LEO grandmother accodig to my BIL who is a CA LEO.


You know whats missing in this post?... The gun related issue.


Never once was I asked if I wad a weapon and all of them were handled professionally by various LEA's in CA.

KTXdm9
June 3, 2012, 09:05 PM
Thanks for sharing a positive experience. Always good to hear the other side.

Salmoneye
June 3, 2012, 09:13 PM
Though you both handled it well, I can not understand that the masses don't realize that the best place for registration and insurance cards are tacked to the inside of the visor...

The last time I was stopped (granted it was 1992, and it was for a light out on my way to work at 4AM), I was complimented for having my license, registration, and proof of insurance in my left hand (with both hands on the wheel) as the officer approached...

They HATE it when people start 'rummaging' through their pockets, glove boxes, and consoles...

And I don't blame them in the least...

Compliments to the officer that stopped you, and you for your actions...

loadedround
June 3, 2012, 11:37 PM
Without going into a boring detail, I was stopped for speeding on the Pa Turnpike around the Hershey exit. Pennsylvania State Police officer (PSP) noticed my NRA stiker on the rear window and aske if I had firearms in the car. The answer was yes, two in the trunk. Asked what they were and he bs'ed with me for about 5 minutes before giving me a verbal warning to slow down. I was doing an honest 82 mph in a 65 mph zone. PSP officers are both good guys and very professional in my book.

stbarsh
June 4, 2012, 01:45 AM
A few years back, a PSP trooper pulled me over for speeding...about 76 in a 65. He even pointed at me as I passed him. Obviously, I pulled over right away, and he got all my paperwork and returned to his car. When he came back a few minutes later, I had a written "warning," no ticket. He didn't say a word about why...just said, "Slow down and be safe." To this day, I think he gave me the warning instead of the ticket because it was the day after my birthday.

My experience with PSP has been very positive. Always get to talk to some at Penn State football games, too...all seem like great guys...with a tough job to do!

Driftertank
June 4, 2012, 04:08 AM
Had an experience similar to the OP only slightly less dramatic, a few years ago with a county sheriff's deputy in my area.

Got pulled for a brakelight. The deputy approached my window and asked me for license, registration and insurance. I handed over my license and she prompted me again for reg and insurance.

I politely said, "Well ma'am, i have them, but they're both stowed in the glovebox under my sidearm. I figure it's easier for both of us if i didn't reach for it with you standing here."
She responded, "That's fair enough. Is the car in your name?"
"Yes ma'am."
"No warrants on you?"
"No ma'am."
"Okay. I'm going to run your information. Please just stay here and keep your hands up on the wheel."
She checked me out, informed me of the taillight, and let me on my way. Probably the most pleasant exchange i've ever had with a LEO. Probably had her a little on edge though. :D

Flopsweat
June 4, 2012, 07:44 AM
I remember tooling down a highway in SoCal on my bike, feet on the highway pegs and back against the pack lashed to the passenger seat, just enjoying the beautiful sunny day. I spot a small black car coming up an on-ramp a half-mile behind me, and instantly think unmarked CHP Mustang. Take a couple of looks in the mirror, and decide it's a Celica, ease it back up to a comfortable speed. I was wrong. I pull all the way to the far edge of the shoulder, park, pull the keys, dismount and remove my helmet.

Chippie walks up with a big smile on his face.

"How you doing?"
(sheepish)"Well, I was doing a lot better 5 minutes ago."
(grin)"You looked like you were enjoying the sunny day, leaning back and all."
"Yeah, it sure is nice out today."
"I saw you checking me out. Why didn't you slow down?"
"I thought it was a Mustang at first, but I decided it looked more like a Celica. Sorry about that, my license is inside my jacket. I'm going to slowly pull it out if that's OK." It would have looked just like drawing a gun.
"Sure, go ahead."
"Here you go. I have to pull the seat to get the insurance and registration."
"I don't need to see that - I'm just giving you a warning. Next time will be a ticket. 75 or 80 wouldn't be a big deal out here in the middle of nowhere, but you were way over that. You need to slow down." And the rest of the spiel. Really nice guy, and he did succeed in getting me to slow down.

I too was unarmed, since my county wouldn't give a crippled 80 year old jewelry merchant a permit, let alone me.

CHP were always the nice guys. Locals would write you up every time. At least that was the case a couple of decades ago, before I moved out of state.

fallout mike
June 4, 2012, 09:25 AM
I average 60,000 miles a year for the past 16 years. I've been pulled over A LOT!! But I've only been gotten 1 ticket. The rest warnings. Im always really nice. I've always had guns with me but never been asked about them even when they are visible. Now most of these stops were like for 10mph over so nothing crazy. The few people I know who talk about really bad experiences with cops all have the same thing in common. A rap sheet.

paramedic70002
June 4, 2012, 11:41 AM
I was traveling I-64 between Charlottesville and Richmond VA late one night when I became very sleepy, so I pulled over as far as possible from the roadway and took a nap. With my gun on my lap. When I awoke, there were blue lights flickering off my mirrors and a VSP Trooper at my driver's door. His left hand held a flashlight, which was shining on the gun. I'm pretty sure where his right hand was! The car was turned off so I couldn't use the windows. I VERY SLOWLY moved the gun onto the passenger seat and then cracked the door open. He explained to me that he was checking cars and that I should go a few more miles down the road to a rest area. I gave a sincere "Yes Sir, thank you" and moved on down the road. I think that went as well as it did because I had "Rescue Squad" license plates but he sure could have been a lot more excited than he was either way.

22-rimfire
June 4, 2012, 12:13 PM
The PA State Police are professionals. Many in the Sheriff's departments, cities, or in your case, Townships are not as highly trained as the state police officers. But still, most LEO's are no different from the rest of us. They are just doing a job.

Glad you had a good experience overall. Is the speed limit still 55 MPH on the Turnpike?

Tinpig
June 4, 2012, 12:33 PM
The few people I know who talk about really bad experiences with cops all have the same thing in common. A rap sheet.

Or an attitude and the mouth to go with it.

I broke down a couple of towns away from home on my way back from the range one evening. I was carrying, and had cased guns and ammo all over the back seat of my truck.:) A cop stopped to help and I immediately informed him about the guns. We had a great conversation about what we were shooting until the tow-truck arrived. We then transfered the guns to the cruiser and he drove me home!
To a lot of cops, especially in small towns, "Serve and Protect" is more than just a slogan. I made sure to write a letter of appreciation to his chief.

The suggestion to keep your registration behind the driver's visor is excellent.

Massachusetts does not have a duty to inform, but if stopped while carrying I do...surprises involving guns just don't make sense during an interaction with police.

Tinpig

ATBackPackin
June 4, 2012, 02:15 PM
The suggestion to keep your registration behind the driver's visor is excellent.

Does nobody else but me use their visor to block the sun? I know in our vehicles the visors have no pockets, so if you flip it down anything up there would fall in your lap.

22-rimfire
June 4, 2012, 02:25 PM
You can buy little attachment packs that slip over the visor to store a few things like the insurance card, registration, or a few bandaides.

Owen Sparks
June 4, 2012, 03:07 PM
It is perfectly legal in my state to carry a pistol in your car without a permit so there is no 'duty to inform' law. I would only tell the police if they were about to search my car and find anyway. It is generally a bad idea to volunteer information. It might be used against you as probable cause. Sort of like saying "You are not going to look in the trunk are you officer?

mdauben
June 4, 2012, 03:56 PM
My reason for sharing this is not that he cut me a break, but rather his complete professionalism throughout the interaction.
Thanks for sharing. We read so many stories of "bad" encounters with LEOs here on THR, that's its good to be reminded that there are still plenty of "good cops" out there.

Salmoneye
June 4, 2012, 04:09 PM
Does nobody else but me use their visor to block the sun? I know in our vehicles the visors have no pockets, so if you flip it down anything up there would fall in your lap.

Thus my use of the word 'Tacked' to the visor...

http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q62/anya678/13-large-paper-clip-iphone-stand.jpg

kb58
June 4, 2012, 04:22 PM
Gee, what a boring story. I hoped it would be another scenario that paints all LEOs in a bad light.

Seriously, thanks for posting this. It helps - in a small way at least - to balance out the disproportionate posts that have nothing but bad things to say about LEOs.

kb58
June 4, 2012, 04:27 PM
It is perfectly legal in my state to carry a pistol in your car without a permit so there is no 'duty to inform' law...
So having the cop see a gun in the glovebox that you're reaching into is of no concern because you don't need a permit? Common sense says to give the guy a heads-up, and so that you don't get yourself on the news as "the suspect was shot as he reached for his gun." But hey, if you don't need a permit it's not a concern...

hang fire
June 4, 2012, 04:48 PM
My last interaction with an LEO was positive too. He was an Indian Corporal in the tribal police in a area where the main HWY goes through the reservation. There are signs posted that no firearms are allowed on the reservation, but when told him I felt obligated to tell him there was a pistol in the glove box with papers he had asked for, he said don't worry about it. He took papers back to his vehicle, came back and said watch my speed as there were children in the area.

That was it, no big deal about the handgun and no ticket, but we did talk guns for a few minutes.

Jalexander
June 4, 2012, 05:08 PM
My experiences with the various Texas law enforcement agencies have almost all been positive, even when they were writing me tickets. I did have an interesting experience Memorial Day weekend, though, when I was driving my truck out to check out my cows. I don't actually drive the truck much these days, and it was out of commission from early March 'til the middle of May, and my registration and inspection were expired. I got nabbed at about dusk by APD when they saw the expired stickers, and I pulled over. When the officer asked me if I knew why they stopped me, I said sure, and apologized for the expired stickers. He was a little taken aback, I think, but while he was talking to me, his partner was looking in the rear side window into the backseat of my truck, and then through the passenger window. About the time the officer who took my license went back to write up my citation, another APD car pulled up behind the first one. I thought it was a little odd when the first officer's partner was peering through my windows, but what I found really strange was that the two officers from the second car also came up and peered through my windows. In fact, the last one stood on the passenger side of my truck with his hand on his pistol for the rest of the time that I was stopped. Maybe two cars per stop is SOP now? Or maybe they were bored?

James

Texan Scott
June 4, 2012, 05:14 PM
^ pretty common here. Not necessarily because it's SOP, or even that it was requested. Seems to be a professional courtesy amongst themselves... if a brother (even if she's a sister, she's a brother) officer is nearby, and has nothing pressing, why WOULDN'T they stop to back up a fellow officer? Always good to have someone watching your back.

loadedround
June 4, 2012, 05:21 PM
It's 65 MPH on the Pa turnpike now.

JShirley
June 4, 2012, 05:28 PM
I'd really like to move to PA.

I generally make it a habit to hand my CCL over if I've been stopped. I've been very lucky, though. I've received only one ticket that "stuck", an expired tag.

I had recently returned from my last deployment, and was on the way back from Derek's house, when I was stopped by a GA state trooper. I was in a new-to-me Grand Am, and was exceeding the speed limit by probably 15 or more. The trooper asked if the address on my license was correct, and I explained that was my old address, and I was still looking for a place after returning from deployment. He took my information and went back to his car to run it.

He came back a few minutes later with a warning. "This is a warning," he said. "It won't affect your insurance." That's all he said.
"Thank you, officer. I'll slow down." And I did.

John

cassandrasdaddy
June 4, 2012, 05:45 PM
So having the cop see a gun in the glovebox that you're reaching into is of no concern because you don't need a permit? Common sense says to give the guy a heads-up, and so that you don't get yourself on the news as "the suspect was shot as he reached for his gun." But hey, if you don't need a permit it's not a concern...


common sense has gone the way of the dodo

CharlieDeltaJuliet
June 4, 2012, 05:59 PM
That is the kind of story, I love to hear about. While there are a few police officers that got beat up everyday in school, and take their hostilities out on everyone else, the biggest majority are great honest, fair, hardworking men and women. The sad part is they usually even get a bad rap for doing their job. It sounds like this guy was exactly the type law enforcement officer this country needs.
It is also nice to hear someone "take their licks" like a man. And not whine about getting a ticket. So I am glad that he went easy on you. You did exactly what you should have done involving the handgun. Glad it wont cost too much.

ny32182
June 4, 2012, 06:38 PM
It also only took me one stop with a gun in the glove box to start carrying it somewhere else, but, once I informed him that is where it was, he just said "fine, set it on the seat", and that was that.

Honestly if he was then keeping his hand on his own gun while I felt the need to "SLOWLY reach into the glove box and move it with TWO fingers" like it was a stinky gym sock, I would probably just sit back and say "look, you're making me kind of nervous, would you please reach through the open window and secure the gun so we can get on with it?" Once you've told him that you have a gun, where it is, and that you will be placing it on the seat at his request, his mind should be at ease. If you were planning to shoot him, you probably would have done absolutely none of the above.

I've been stopped, as of March, now I think six times while carrying. Never once have I had an officer go for his gun.

Jalexander
June 4, 2012, 07:18 PM
^ pretty common here. Not necessarily because it's SOP, or even that it was requested. Seems to be a professional courtesy amongst themselves... if a brother (even if she's a sister, she's a brother) officer is nearby, and has nothing pressing, why WOULDN'T they stop to back up a fellow officer? Always good to have someone watching your back.

It wasn't so much the two cars at the stop that I found odd - I see that about half the time, when APD has anyone stopped - it was that all three of the officers who weren't actively writing my ticket made the effort to look into my back window and passenger window. Nothing in the back seat was that interesting, just some fencing tools and a denim jacket. Heck, maybe they'd never seen a wire stretcher.

And like I said, my interactions with Texas law enforcement officers have almost always been good, so I wasn't suggesting that I resent them being careful with their own safety.

James

Jaymo
June 4, 2012, 07:20 PM
The two times I was stopped while carrying, I handed my carry permit to the officer, along with my license and insurance card.
The first time, the officer shone his flashlight on my pistol, which (as I had informed him) was in the passenger seat. My hands NEVER went anywhere near it. I have no desire to get shot, and I let him know that. (Star Firestar .45)
The second time, the officer (different county) took my pistol and set it on the roof of my car, scratching my paint (didn't find out until later), but was otherwise not interested in it, other than curiosity about the make, and observing that it was a good size for an OD/BU pistol for him. He asked me how I liked it (reliability/accuracy/price/trigger pull) and said that he was going to have to buy one. (Makarov)

I has a GSP Lieutenant pull me over for going 95 in a 65 zone. He asked me if I had a reason to be driving so fast, and I honestly (stupidly?) blurted out that I was running late for class (tech school), and that if I was one minute late I'd have to make up a whole day (the truth).
Ya know what he did? He gave me a written warning and told me to slow it down, which I did.

Kaeto
June 4, 2012, 08:08 PM
Since I'm the only person who should be driving my car I keep my registration and insurance cards in my wallet with my licenses.

Texan Scott
June 4, 2012, 08:45 PM
The most negative story I have to tell is actually one my wife and I joke about now... I used to drive a Mercedes Benz. It was 14 years old, but it was well maintained and without looking real closely, it was hard to tell it wasn't an expensive car. I had just moved into a neighborhood where I was definitely in the minority.
One evening just after dark,I was going to pick up my wife from her new job, and as I left the neighborhood, I noticed a squad car following me. Obviously, from that point on I was doing everything 105% by the book, but he pulled me over anyway. The driver and his partner BOTH got out, and while the driver came up to my window, his partner came up to the passenger side with his hand on a Glock in a drop-leg thigh holster. They made me get out of the car, and warned me to keep my hands in plain view, asked me where I was going, what I did for a living, a number of things that had NOTHING to do with traffic law, ran my license for warrants, took a thumbprint on a palm-held thingy, and the cop was asking me who I knew in the neighborhood while he read my license. Suddenly he stopped and asked incredulously "Wait... (re-reads the updated address on the license)... you LIVE here? Apparently, a white guy driving a Benz in that neighborhood after dark scared the &#!# out of them...
The rest of the 'traffic stop' took about 90 seconds, and he cautioned me to 'make sure to come to a complete stop behind the sign.'
My wife still laughs about it... 'omg, YOU got racially profiled? You're the geekiest white guy I know!'
I never did mention the loaded .38 in the center console.

Robert
June 4, 2012, 10:07 PM
As a former CO State Trooper I love hearing about positive interactions with LEOs. But as much as I enjoy this thread, nice to have one the is not bashing cops for once, it is not really gun related and that makes it OT for THR.

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