Shoot With One Eyed Closed


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ShamboPyro
June 6, 2012, 07:38 AM
I was reading online that shooting with both eyes open is better for situation awareness (and other benefits); but for some reason, I can't. Whenever I try to aim down the sights, I see double. I don't have glasses or anything, before you ask.

By the way, I new to THR, and I'm a 14 year old shooter.:D

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HDCamel
June 6, 2012, 07:50 AM
Try squinting your other eye.

valnar
June 6, 2012, 08:22 AM
Hi Sam. Welcome.

I am in my 40's and I can't keep both open either. Others can. But I'm also cross-eye dominant, so I have a host of other problems.

Resist Evil
June 6, 2012, 08:30 AM
It takes practice to aim accurately with both eyes open. You are young and you will adapt if you are determined to do so.

I had the flu one time when I was 12. My mother begrudgingly put a 12-inch B&W television across from me in an effort to keep me from bothering her with the fever, the pukes, the shivers, etc. I spent enough time looking at the TV sideways because my head was on the pillow that when I was able to sit up, the TV picture actually appeared sideways to me!

I'm way older now and both eyes open during sighting is natural.

Loosedhorse
June 6, 2012, 09:00 AM
I still shoot with one eye closed. Both eyes open slows me down, with the same "two sets of sights" issue.

You can do a search here on eye dominance (or eye dominant, or cross dominant) and see what pops up.

Eye dominance: some folks have a strongly dominant eye, and that eye "takes over" with both eyes open so they have no problem shooting that way. Others have a weakly dominant eye, or even co-dominance. For those people, there's often no dependable way around the "two rear sights and two targets" problem when focused on the front sight, or the "two front sights" problem if focused at the target, other than to close one eye.

Tactically, open your eye immediately after the shot, as you scan and search for other threats. For those who can and do keep both eyes open, great.

Some people are successful in training themselves to shoot well with both eyes open even if it started out difficult. You can try that. But it didn't work for me, and it might not work for you. Everyone is different, and training will not work for everyone.

Flopsweat
June 6, 2012, 09:07 AM
Welcome to THR Sam!

With a holographic sight it only took me a few hours to get used to shooting with both eyes open. I've been able to do it with scopes for some time now - sometimes it helps me see clearer, sometimes not. There are some iron sights that I still can't do this with no matter how hard I try.

I think the method that worked best for me was to shut the non-dominant eye and then open it a few times until I could see the sights properly. At first it wouldn't stay that way for long, but over time I got better at it. You eventually learn to ignore the image from the other eye. When shooting trap, I like to sight in over the trap machine with one eye shut, relax, open both eyes and yell for the pull. Depth perception helps a lot when shooting at a moving target.

joecil
June 6, 2012, 09:23 AM
Well I lost my left eye at 12 years old but was taught to shoot with both eyes open. Now I have no choice but it doesn't seem to effect much more than my depth perception. But living with one eye for 54 years this month I've learned to even compensate for no depth perception. So basically if you can shoot with one or two eyes really doesn't matter if you can hit what you aim at and are aware of your surroundings.

PBR Streetgang
June 6, 2012, 09:28 AM
I've been shooting for 50 something years,one eye only. I have no problem shooting strong side /dominate eye or week side/weak eye.
As I get older my eyesight isn't what it was ,I have ventured into red dot sights and shooting with both eyes open. After using a rds for about a year I find I can now shoot both eyes open with normal sights and it feels almost normal.

Who says you can't teach a old dog new tricks

Stump Water
June 6, 2012, 11:01 AM
I tend to hit what I'm aiming at when I close one eye, I don't when I leave both open, so I close one eye when I aim.

I figure that any situation that requires the additional "situational awareness" that the peripheral vision of my non-dominant eye would provide isn't going to require a lot of aimed shooting.

dcarch
June 6, 2012, 11:05 AM
I shoot with one eye too. I always have the "double sights" issue too... :) You're not alone.

shuvelrider
June 6, 2012, 11:12 AM
Practice at it to understand the perspective. Sight alignment first with both eyes open, then add in the sight picture of the front sight on your target. The rear sight will fade/blur out, keep your focus on the sight picture up front.

Your eye's open will keep the front sight in focus on the target, when it all "clicks" for you, then you'll see its not difficult. Practice will make sight alignment a natural reflex, then just focus on your sight picture.

A lot less strenuous on your eyes and greatly reduces eye fatigue, taught that to myself years ago for pistol and rifle. Works very well with aperture type sight such as found on the M16/M4 series rifle.

kcshooter
June 6, 2012, 11:14 AM
After you've verified which eye is dominant, put a piece of scotch tape (not the crystal clear kind, use the foggy translucent kind) over the lens of the non-dominant eye and shoot with both eyes open.

Do this until you train your brain to ignore the target/sight picture you get from the weak eye.

You will do yourself a great service by learning to focus on the front sight now, as a young shooter.

Also, practice, a lot. Even dry fire practice will help you learn front sight vs target focus and help train out the secondary picture.

ConstitutionCowboy
June 6, 2012, 11:32 AM
I just turned 66 at the end of last month and am just now trying to start shooting with both eyes open. Young or old, it's tough.

One thing that helps me is the use of red dot sights. With both eyes open, focused on the target, the red dot appears superimposed on the target as if it were a laser. It's not so simple trying to focus the one eye on the front sight and keep the sight on target when the other eye wants to assume a similar focus, wanders toward the front sight, and now you have TWO rear sights in your vision to sort out!

It'll be interesting to see if I can master the new trick as an old dog.

Woody

Drail
June 6, 2012, 12:07 PM
The advantage of shooting with both eyes open is it causes much less strain to the eyes than closing one. The problem most people have is that it will cause you to see two front sights, one for the left eye and one for the right eye. Most people are uncomfortable with that because the human brain wants to merge the two images together and you are telling it not to. You have to teach your brain to relax and accept two images - you just ignore the one in front of your weak eye and concentrate on the one if front of your master eye. When done properly it will give you a huge advantage. One way to get comfortable with this is to place some frosted Scotch tape over the lens of your weak eye. This allows light to enter the weak eye but does not allow it to resolve a focus or be strained by squinting it shut. Then concentrate on the focused image from the other eye. You can practice this with just your index finger in your living room or garage or anywhere. You need to stay relaxed and not force it. Your brain will learn how to do this even though it doesn't want to. It will allow you to shoot and be aware of much more of your environment than closing one eye.

farson135
June 6, 2012, 03:32 PM
You have to train yourself to keep both eyes open. When I first started shooting small bore I had to use a blinder, now I do not need one. I suggest you use a blinder, just put an index card between your non-dominate eye and your shooting glasses and keep both eyes open.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
June 6, 2012, 03:40 PM
Can't say I have that issue.


Sent from my MP3/Hands-Free/Web-Browsing Device

HGUNHNTR
June 6, 2012, 03:47 PM
ANother often overlooked advantage of "two eyed" shooting is that your balance is much better.

Texan Scott
June 6, 2012, 03:55 PM
with a target-focus, everyone sees a paralaxed image of the front sight, don't they? but some of us quickly and easily train to not notice, and others can't so much. sounds like an eye dominance problem, which isn't anything wrong with the eyes... just a perception issue. don't have that problem myself, so i can only advise you look into some informed professional sources... i WILL say that my wife seems to be cross-dominant, and the odd 'compensation' she receives for the trouble she has shooting strong-side is that she shoots just as well weak-side... a true ambidextrous shooter!

ShamboPyro
June 6, 2012, 04:28 PM
Thanks for the help. I taped up the left side of my shooting glasses, and now I only see one gun (although two guns did look cool). I think I'll just use that configuration until I don't need the tape anymore. There is one negative about the solution though, I'm gonna look pretty damn stupid at the range!

kcshooter
June 6, 2012, 04:39 PM
I'm gonna look pretty damn stupid at the range! No, you won't.
In the first place, most of those guys at the range either learned the same way, or never bothered to learn correctly in the first place.
Second, it's only until you learn to control your brains perception of the image.
Think about how good you'll look when you're outshooting the guys who have been shooting as long as you've been alive.

Drail
June 6, 2012, 04:59 PM
Some of the best IPSC shooters in the world have used the scotch tape trick. As another poster said after a while you won't need it any more. It's simply a matter of reconditioning your brain to see the world as two separate images on different angles when it wants to combine them into one image so it can construct depth perception. :scrutiny: The best is yet to come - after you learn to see this way the image of the front sight that you are focusing on will appear semi transparent - you can actually see throught the front sight and see the bullseye at the same time. Now your brain is seeing much more information than it used to. I'm not making this up. You too can be a Jedi pistol shooter.

Loosedhorse
June 6, 2012, 05:15 PM
A problem with the Scotch tape approach: if you draw your gun in a SD emergency, you won't be wearing it.

Are you going to keep both eyes open if that shows you two pairs of confusing sights? Or are you going to close one eye and get a clear sight picture? I don't think the Scotch tape approach will decide that for anyone.

kcshooter
June 6, 2012, 05:26 PM
if you draw your gun in a SD emergency, you won't be wearing it.Dude, he's 14.
I think by 21 he'll have it figured out.

CharlieDeltaJuliet
June 6, 2012, 05:28 PM
I shoot with both open. It just seems like it is easier to get my sights or scope back on target.

Loosedhorse
June 6, 2012, 05:33 PM
Dude, he's 14.
I think by 21 he'll have it figured out. Why tell me that? OP: he says you'll figure it out by the time you're 21.

:D

Dean1818
June 6, 2012, 05:54 PM
I am left eye dominate and right handed

The ONLY way i can shoot a shotgun is closing my left eye


When i pistol shoot i use my dominate eye to look down the sights and my right eye is open

Chin on shoulder


Its fairly common

Skribs
June 6, 2012, 06:26 PM
My right eye sucks, so I use my left eye only for a lot of things.

carbuncle
June 6, 2012, 06:29 PM
Hi Sam. Welcome.

I am in my 40's and I can't keep both open either. Others can. But I'm also cross-eye dominant, so I have a host of other problems.

Ditto onall counts: welcome to the board, first, and I have the same problem. In close I'm fine with both eyes if I turn my head, but for longer range target accuracy I have close one eye or the other.

jmr40
June 6, 2012, 07:14 PM
Dry firing is your friend. It does not matter what type of gun you are using or what type of sights both eyes open is far better. With practice anyone can do it, but if you have done it wrong all your life it is harder to change.

You can sit on your couch while watching TV and get in hundreds of dry fires for free each evening. With a little time you will figure it out.

I am left eye dominate and right handed

The ONLY way i can shoot a shotgun is closing my left eye




Then you should really learn how to shoot left handed. My brother had the same issue and was an average shot at best until he made up his mind to learn how to shoot left handed. It took a while, and at first his shooting was worse, but after he mastered it he became far better shot than before. Once again dry firing is your friend.

ShamboPyro
June 6, 2012, 09:17 PM
Correction: At the range I GO TO, the rangemaster may look at me as if I'm stupid. I find him quite annoying, as he originally told me to keep one eye closed, and he just buts into my business (as well as other people's) kind of alot. ("lower the target, Your case must be zippered shut before stepping away from the booth, not as your stepping away from the booth, I'm almost as bad as the police here, nag, nag, nag.) What really bothers me is his cocky, arrogant tone of voice. Anyway my dad, not being "a gun guy" (such as myself), might laugh at me before I explain to him why my eyes are now "pirate style".

ShamboPyro
June 6, 2012, 09:24 PM
I'm still figuring out this posting system. I can't figure out how to delete this reply.

Ole Coot
June 6, 2012, 09:41 PM
I've shot with both eyes open for 60yrs and it's much easier to judge distance and keep your target aligned. I would recommend it if you're not set in your ways.

tekarra
June 6, 2012, 10:00 PM
A few years back Jim Cirillo wrote an article on both eyes open combat shooting by looking along the sides of the slide or barrel to get an equal sight picture. I practiced the technique for a while and found it surprisingly accurate and quick.

Nushif
June 6, 2012, 10:03 PM
I squint one eye, I know it's not ideal but to call either eye of mine "dominant" is an overstatement, seeing as my eye dominance shifts when I put on glasses or take them off. 8)

At a certain point reality has to be injected into the training and frankly at tis point I think I at least am better off training with a slight squint.

Inebriated
June 6, 2012, 10:07 PM
Just thought I'd pass along a little tip I've found that helped more than the glasses trick...

When you are getting your sight picture, start with one eye closed, then slowly open it. That should keep your dominant eye focused, and combining that with the glasses trick will get you up and running in no time... well, it takes a while, but you will get it. Also, don't worry about the range so much... you can practice all of this at home, which also acts as excellent dry fire practice (also highly recommended).

lloveless
June 7, 2012, 05:53 PM
Both eyes open firing in the dark makes you blind. This whole thing about both eyes open is much ado about nothing. If it works for you great, don't diss those of us who shoot one eyed and like it.
ll

jmr40
June 7, 2012, 08:49 PM
God gave us 2 eyes, 2 legs, 2 ears, and 2 arms for a reason. Everything works better when both are put to use. Fortunately we CAN get buy with one if we have to, but why would you only use 1/2 of the resources given to you unless you have no other option.

kcshooter
June 7, 2012, 10:02 PM
This whole thing about both eyes open is much ado about nothing.No, it's about something.

There's a reason every defensive handgun instructor will tell you that you should keep both eyes open.

Loosedhorse
June 8, 2012, 10:19 AM
There's a reason every defensive handgun instructor will tell you that you should keep both eyes open.
"If you can." If keeping both eyes open slows down fire or makes it inaccurate, that's no advantage.

Any instructor who doesn't recognize individual needs and differences is not a good instructor. Every one that I've met, has.

kcshooter
June 8, 2012, 10:25 AM
If keeping both eyes open slows down fire or makes it inaccurate, that's no advantage.
Any instructor who doesn't recognize individual needs and differences is not a good instructor.Any good instructor would try to teach how to do it properly, rather than just saying "Oh, you can't? Then don't."

buck460XVR
June 8, 2012, 02:34 PM
Think about how good you'll look when you're outshooting the guys who have been shooting as long as you've been alive.


Dude......Claiming that by puttin' a piece of scotch tape over your dominate eye temporarily will automatically make you a Marksman Extraordinaire is foolish. The OP may already be out-shooting many folks that have been shooting longer than he's been alive, but don't give all the credit to 3M. Odds are there are many folks that shoot with one eye closed that will out-shoot him and you both no matter how long you practice.

Dude.....many of us grew up learning to shoot long before the idea of "dominate eye" was around. We were taught to put our cheek to the buttstock close the other offside eye and aim. For me it has worked well for almost 6 decades. For those that have not realized it, those of us that close one eye don't walk around with the eye continuously closed. For me, it is closed for the short time while I'm focused on my sights right before the shot. If others don't like the way I shoot, I don't really care. I like the way I shoot and I shoot accurately, that's all that really matters. Like many claim here on the internet.....I NEVER miss.;)

Dude, he's 14.
I think by 21 he'll have it figured out.


Dude.....I also grew up in a time when the word "dude" was a derogatory noun and it was an insult to call someone a dude. Since you seem to think it is a term of endearment, I will appropriately use it for you. You can take the context any way you want.

kcshooter
June 8, 2012, 02:39 PM
Unbunch your panties, DUDE.

Nushif
June 8, 2012, 05:36 PM
Dude.....I also grew up in a time when the word "dude" was a derogatory noun and it was an insult to call someone a dude.

Oddly enough I live in a time where "Sir" is used either as a joke or prior to insulting someone. But I hardly think the linguistic changes of the personal address in English is part of this board' mission to figure out.

I do however think someone here has made a very good point that is often conveniently overlooked by the people advocating a zero tolerance policy for open eyes:
It's not like the one eye is consistently shut. It only goes shut during the time of sight alignment and trigger squeeze. When I shoot rapidy that's not exactly a long time. In my case oftentimes it is no more than a "Clint Eastwood" style squint. Not to mention that yes, some people (much like myself) are very, very weakly dominant.

So, let's say I shoot with my glasses on: The height of the target in relation to me would determine whether I am shooting with my left eye mildly dominant or my right eye. Seeing as my dominant eye with glasses and without is different and my glasses sit on my nose. (I know, very improper. My pants also sit on my hips, what can I say?)

There simply isn't an easy answer that can be summed up in one hady dandy little forum paragraph filled with "rightness" and the "proper way" to shoot effectively. Maxims and doctrine have their place. But stuff like EVERYONE EVERYWHERE SHALL ALWAYS ONLY EVER BE TAUGHT TO SHOOT WITH BOTH EYES OPEN IRREGARDLESS OF ANY DISCOMFORT MEDICAL STATE OR LACK OF COMFORT ON PSAID PERSON'S PART is something I wouldn't be surprised to hear in a gun store for advice. Right along the lines of "This little lady needs a nice titanium weight six shooter. Look how light it is!"

Loosedhorse
June 8, 2012, 05:51 PM
Any good instructor would try to teach how to do it properlyThere is nothing to "teach" here. If someone shows up without a right hand, you can't "teach" him to shoot with either hand, even though that is something all good defensive handgun instructors will emphasize.

Similarly, if someone can't shoot quickly and accurately with both eyes open, you can at most ask them to try it in the class. If they try it and it works for them, great--well done; it's always possible that the reason they shoot with one eye closed is because they were told to do that, not because they have to.

If instead they try and confirm for you that it slows them down and/or reduces their accuracy, tell them keep closing one eye while firing, and re-open when they are scanning and searching for additional threats.

Training time is short. A good instructor will spend time on things that the student can change, not on things that he can't.It's not like the one eye is consistently shut. It only goes shut during the time of sight alignment and trigger squeeze. When I shoot rapidy that's not exactly a long time. Not to mention that yes, some people (much like myself) are very, very weakly dominant.Bingo.Dude.....I also grew up in a time when the word "dude" was a derogatory noun and it was an insult to call someone a dudeWell, buck460XVR, that is exactly how I took it when he used it on me: uninvited familiarity, like "pal" or "bucko." Then, the way he used it on you confirmed he meant to be derogatory. Some folks are like that.

kcshooter
June 8, 2012, 11:23 PM
I was trying to give the OP a boost of confidence, as he is a 14 year old who is the next generation of firearms enthusiast. Since he's about the age of my own son, I want him to not worry about looking goofy with tape on his glasses, but to worry about shooting well, and having fun. Way to show him what the septuagenarian generation thinks, you two. Remember what it was like to be 14? Real credit to the field, you two are.


Guess you can't teach old dogs new tricks.
There is nothing to "teach" hereActually, there may very well be, if you're willing to learn.


Nobody said anything about right way or wrong way. But there is a better way. A way that is taught at the most highly respected defensive firearm training schools in the country. That's simply a statement of fact.

If your unwilling or uninterested in improvement, that's fine, but for those that are, (and for those that aren't so thin skinned to take a common part of today's vernacular as an insult,) maybe thinking about using a better way to defend yourself might be of interest.

I'm not saying that while standing still at the range and shooting at a static paper target that you aren't able to shoot accurately. I'm sure you are.

I'm saying that shooting while moving, transitioning from one target to another, learning to shoot defensively, will be better served if you don't block out half your vision and all of your depth perception.

If closing one eye works for you, great. If you'd like to improve yourself, both eyes open may be something you want to begin trying to train yourself to do.

Some people are happy with the way they are at the status quo. Great. Myself, I try to improve in all aspects of my life any chance I get. If there is a better way, I'm going to try it. If you don't want to try it, fine.

(If your cross eye dominance precludes you from being able to do this, then that's fine. http://pistol-training.com/archives/433 This may help with that.)




And you can take my use of the word "dude" however you want. I can't do a thing about that. If you think it's commonly considered an insult in today's day and age, well, that's not my problem, it's yours.

GunnerShotz
June 9, 2012, 12:35 AM
Dry firing is your friend.
You can sit on your couch while watching TV and get in hundreds of dry fires for free each evening. With a little time you will figure it out.

I've been doing that myself :) Working on trigger control and tracking moving targets with both eyes open at the same time. I can easily see the profile of the gun against the 'backlight' of the TV screen and I'm getting a much more complete picture of how it's oriented in realtion to the targets I pick. I'll dry fire a few on the TV, then pick a stationary target somewhere else in the room, dry fire and make sure I'm staying on target, then go back to the TV.

I'm orienting the gun first with both eyes (and both the guns I see in front of me) and placing the target right in between the two. Then my dominant eye takes over and I get a sight picture of the entire rear of the gun with the rear and front sight lined up. Then I focus on the front sight over the target, the rest blurs out... and squeeze the trigger.

It sounds complicated, but I'm getting faster at it and staying on target!

Everyone is going to be a little bit different with regard to eye dominance and the ability to let things go in and out of focus at will.... remember those rediculous dot pictures that were popular for a while? The ones you had to stare at and let both eyes go out of focus just to see? :eek: Practice makes better ;)

wow6599
June 9, 2012, 01:46 AM
I'm 35 years old. Been shooting since I was 6 or 7. I have tried shooting with both eyes open for the last 10 years, and can't do it.

I say do what ever works for ya.

Loosedhorse
June 9, 2012, 09:40 AM
But there is a better wayThat is an assumption on your part. There may not be.

As I already said, there is no way to teach someone without a right hand to shoot with their right hand. Similarly, there is no way to teach someone who cannot shoot unconfused with both eyes open to do so. We have had several people in this thread, including me, explain to you that we are such people--we do exist.

I have never said (look at my first post; heck, look at all of them) that if you CAN shoot well and fast with both eyes open, you should not. You, however, seem to say that even if you cannot, you should.

That you would insist that a person, if he does what he can instead of what he cannot, is doing it "the wrong way" shows a rigid small-mindedness that is not a credit to anyone (see below), and is belittling of students with different abilities.Way to show him what the septuagenarian generation thinks, you two. Remember what it was like to be 14? Real credit to the field, you two are.Interesting that with your disrepectful, ad hominem tone, you apparently feel you ARE a credit to the field? Another internet guru, bravely insulting those he doesn't agree with.

Let me state this clearly: you are wrong. That you can mount no better arguments against my position on this than calling me "dude", a septuagenarian, (I've personally learned a lot from older folks, and would never try to use that term as an insult), and sarcastically "a real credit" shows that you admit that you are wrong, and so must use insult instead of argument to "make your point."

Or make your bones. A way that is taught at the most highly respected defensive firearm training schools in the country. That's simply a statement of fact.Funny that I've been to several of these "most highly respected" schools--a few twice--and no one has tried to change my shooting with one eye/scanning with both eyes. I guess either they were all asleep that day, or you are not speaking correctly when you tell us how they actually approach this issue in practice.

Color me surprised.

kcshooter
June 9, 2012, 10:04 AM
That is an assumption on your part. There may not be.I'm sorry, are you saying shooting with a full field of view and having depth perception is not a better way? That, if you can do so, it isn't better to shoot this way rather than having no depth perception and half your vision?

That just seems like a failure of logic.


As I already said, there is no way to teach someone without a right hand to shoot with their right hand.You can say it as many times as you want, doesn't make it even remotely relevant to the conversation.



That you would insist that a person, if he does what he can instead of what he cannot, is doing it "the wrong way"
You need to pay attention. Your typical way of claiming people said things they didn't won't hold water when I specifically state: Nobody said anything about right way or wrong way



Let me state this clearly: you are wrongWell, since I haven't claimed to be right or wrong, but you clearly think you are right, even though this is a highly contested subject with loads of people on both sides, let me tell you, I think you are wrong to call me wrong. Especially when I said: If closing one eye works for you, great.



and sarcastically "a real credit" shows that you admit that you are wrong, and so must use insult instead of argument to "make your point."Wow. The failed logic of your ad hominem attack, after calling me out for one, is impressive.


Funny that I've been to several of these "most highly respected" schools--a few twice--and no one has tried to change my shooting with one eye/scanning with both eyesOdd. So have I. And I've never heard anyone say that it isn't prefered to shoot with both eyes open if you can. Have you?

Loosedhorse
June 9, 2012, 10:42 AM
I'm sorry, are you saying shooting with a full field of view and having depth perception is not a better way?I'm sorry, are you saying that shooting slowly and inaccurately is a better way? :rolleyes::D

By closing one eye you (briefly) give up 30 degrees of visual field. Not everyone has "depth perception" with both eyes open (one of my past instructors does not), and depth perception is not important to the process of aligning sights on target. Guess I'll never win an arguement with someone who fails at logic.You'll never win an argument when ad hominem insult is your form of "argument."doesn't make it even remotely relevant to the conversation.That you refuse to see or admit that it is completely relevant says everything.You need to pay attentionI don't "need" to do anything. But I am happy to show what you are saying. That you say "better way" instead of "right way"? Immaterial: your way is not the "better way" for some students.this is a highly contested subjectIt is not. Weak ocular dominance and ocular co-dominance are well established entities: no controversy. Training cannot change ocular dominance: no controversy. Some students with weak (or no) ocular dominance can successfully train to "ignore" their double vision, but many cannot: no controversy.

See, if you want, this article (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=ocular++weakly+dominance&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CF4QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.peteblakeley.com%2Fpdf%2Farticle2.pdf&ei=jk3TT872B4nJ6gHTqqCeAw&usg=AFQjCNF2j4pSUD8tDuVF9psTZEyNAUDlHg) by Pete Blakeley, a well known TX competitive shooting instructor:Acquire the target with both eyes open. By doing this we have retained everything that nature has given us, full peripheral, full stereopsis and full binocular vision. Close the “off” eye a split second before the shot is taken, just as the correct target/barrel relationship is seen. Unfortunately, some shooters abandon objectivity and often display a stubborn reluctance to try this because the myth still exists that we must shoot with both eyes open. But if we can be more consistent in a competitive environment by closing the off eye, why not give it a try?"Stubborn reluctance"--sounds familiar. Of course, you may decide that his "give it a try" attitude is just what a septuagenarian would say! :rolleyes:

You have, I am guessing, never had the experience of dealing with a discouraged student shooter who is ashamed that he or she "can't do it right," and can't get shots on target quickly keeping both eyes open. And then when you tell them that, it's okay--many people have to shoot with one eye closed, and they are "allowed" to do that, it's fine--what a transformation that makes as they start putting shots in the A-Zone quickly.

I have. It makes for a really worthwhile day. I try to give benefit to all of my students, not most.The failed logic of your ad hominem attackPointing out what you do and say? That's neither ad hominem nor illogical.And I've never heard anyone say that it isn't prefered to shoot with both eyes open if you can.My bold. So...you are agreeing with me, now, that if the student can't shoot well with both eyes open, he should close one eye?

Great...but then why did you argue the opposite, and spew all the ad hominem?

Deanimator
June 9, 2012, 10:53 AM
I can't shoot with both eyes open, at least not and use the sights.

If something doesn't work for you, it just doesn't work. It's not THAT important.

exbrit49
June 9, 2012, 10:39 PM
After reading this thread for specific reason, I am surprised at some of the responses.
There is a darn good reason why some folks find it easier and more accurate to shoot with one eye closed. There is a medical reason! Most brains differ in the way they process visual information and that is a given. Read any good medical book and you will see that this is a fact of life. Some will be comfortable shooting with both eyes open and others will not. For some, their brains wll not process the information that will allow them to shoot comfortably
Personally, I used to shoot with both eyes open but after several eye surgeries I had to learn to shoot with my non dominant eye. I shoot handguns right handed, using the left eye. I had to learn to shoot all over again and I am now very comfortable doing so. Now, if I use both eyes I will not be able to focus on the target.
I have a couple of friends that also shoot using one eye, they dont have any medical reasons but they have both tried to shoot with both eyes open and their scores drop drastically and they say it is so hard to focus.
So I dont care which side of the fence you sit on, Let individuals choose their own style of shooting and dont say they are wrong for shooting as they choose, It is their choice!.
Hope no one ever tells me which eye or eyes to shoot with, the response might not be too polite.
After 40 years of shooting handguns I am quite capable of anylizing what it takes for me to shoot targets that I am happy with. This is probably true for most others too.

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