Neck Sizing .223 & 22-250?


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parker51
June 9, 2012, 05:56 PM
Does anyone just neck size these rounds fired in bolt action rifles? I have a 22-250 neck sizing die and was thinking about getting one for .223, but have found that neck sizing 22-250 may not be working out. I find that only about half of the 22-250 rounds that I have neck sized will eject easily and some need excessive pressure to chamber in a Rem 788. Anyone neck size these smaller calibers? If yes, how many reloads would you estimate before having to run brass through a F/L resizer? Thanks!

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Clark
June 9, 2012, 06:22 PM
Are you saying the brass was fired in a rifle different than the Rem 788?

Friendly, Don't Fire!
June 9, 2012, 06:24 PM
I always use a small base full length resizing die and I always resize the entire case for my 22-250 tack-driver. I am anal about case-length so I trim and chamfer each case regularly.

I use these in a bolt action rifle that I have accurized.

MarkA
June 9, 2012, 06:28 PM
If chambering after neck sizing only is getting tight, I'd think that you probably need to bump your shoulders back a couple thousandths. Had the same problem after loading three times with the Lee Collet die. Changed over to a Forster shoulder bump neck sizer and the problem resolved itself (alternative is the afore mentioned FL size). A Wilson case gauge would be a wise investment for checking your fire formed brass. You'll find out real quick if you've got a headspace issue.

parker51
June 9, 2012, 06:30 PM
Are you saying the brass was fired in a rifle different than the Rem 788?
No, same rifle.

parker51
June 9, 2012, 06:34 PM
If chambering after neck sizing only is getting tight, I'd think that you probably need to bump your shoulders back a couple thousandths. Had the same problem after loading three times with the Lee Collet die. Changed over to a Forster shoulder bump neck sizer and the problem resolved itself (alternative is the afore mentioned FL size). A Wilson case gauge would be a wise investment for checking your fire formed brass. You'll find out real quick if you've got a headspace issue.
Need to pick up a case gauge for the 22-250. I also posted thread about some "hot" loads I received from Winchester. I believe this may be why I was having problems with this brass. I purchased a bag of new Win brass today and will try neck sizing these after I fire form them for this gun.

parker51
June 9, 2012, 06:38 PM
I always use a small base full length resizing die and I always resize the entire case for my 22-250 tack-driver. I am anal about case-length so I trim and chamfer each case regularly.

I use these in a bolt action rifle that I have accurized.
How many reloads on the average do you get using a small base die? Seems like you would be working the brass more than necessary if shooting from a bolt action. I have small base dies for .223 and 308, but only use them when resizing some military brass. Thanks.

243winxb
June 9, 2012, 06:53 PM
After firing, the brass should eject normal on your 22-250 unless loaded to hot or the web area has expander from the to hot factory ammo. It the bolt face is not square to the chamber, you will have problems with only neck sizing. From your other post > As I suspected, these were definitely hot rounds. Out of 60 rounds 8 had split necks (found 2 more after the brass was cleaned) and the primer pockets had expanded so much that only 12 would hold a WLR primer tightly. All of the rest I could push the primers out by hand with only minimum force. I ended up using CCI primers in these so I could get at least one reload from this brass. So much for my plans of having a bunch of fire formed 22-250 brass from this lot. Definitely a case of getting what I paid for. Scrap the brass.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
June 9, 2012, 11:48 PM
How many reloads on the average do you get using a small base die? Seems like you would be working the brass more than necessary if shooting from a bolt action. I have small base dies for .223 and 308, but only use them when resizing some military brass. Thanks.
Although I do not keep a record of how many loadings, I must also say that, now that I have the load pefected I only shoot the rifle when I need to take out a woodchuck at 200 to 300 yards or other type game, such as a predator or skunks we have a problem with.

I have about 150 cases (Winchester) that I purchased new and I would say at the present time the majority of those are working around the fifth reloading, or so. Give or take one or two. This load is a hot load, being up at about maximum using IMR 4064 powder and CCI BR2 Small Rifle Bench Rest Primers.

jfrey
June 10, 2012, 01:07 AM
I only neck size my 220 Swift brass if shot in the same rifle. I only get 3 or maybeeee 4 reloads out of a case. The Swift IS a hot load. I know a fellow who has a rifle identical to mine and we can't swap ammo if we neck size only for both guns.

gamestalker
June 10, 2012, 01:17 AM
Extractions issues can certainly be an indication of excessive pressures. But chambering issues indicates that you may likely need to run them through a FL die to reset the shoudlers a tad, as already mentioned. Has this brass ever been reloaded before, or is this it's first session following the factory loads? I generally get several neck sizings prior to resetting the shoulders .002".

I'm kind of think you may need to look closer at the chamber. Having that many factory rounds splitting necks would at least justify ruling any such issues out.
GS

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