Largest 454?


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The-Reaver
June 9, 2012, 09:00 PM
Haven't gotten into reloading yet, but I'm working on it.

So if I wanted to reload some heavy hitting 454 Casull what should I do?
I've seen in the books some 525 grain hard cast lead.

Anything else you guy got? or tried?

RvR

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rcmodel
June 9, 2012, 09:04 PM
The 454 is hard hitting with standard bullet weights for it.

The heavier then normal bullets seldom prove practical for several reasons.

Namely, the guns sights are not regulated for them and you may run out of adjustment.

And a extra long bullet takes up powder space you could use to your advantage with more normal bullet weights the caliber was designed for.

rc

oneounceload
June 9, 2012, 09:17 PM
The first thing you need to do is read several of the reloading books and also the stickies above before you decide you want to load hot 454 loads

56hawk
June 9, 2012, 09:25 PM
The heaviest I have tried is 340 grains, and they were a little too long for my Freedom Arms cylinder. I have loaded 700 grain bullets in my 500 S&W though. My first recommendation is to get H110 powder. It will give you the best performance out of a 454.

MEHavey
June 9, 2012, 09:29 PM
I'd strongly recommend starting in the mid-range when beginning as a reloader, and in this particular case sticking to the 250gr bullet regime, along w/ something like IMR/H4227 and/or Vitavhouri N-110 (not Hodgdon's H110) for flexibility.

You'll get all the stomp you can handle, as well as a feel for the handloading game w/ forgiving powders.

highlander 5
June 9, 2012, 10:27 PM
320 gr won't fit my SRH usng 454 cases.I'll try them in a 45 Colt case later.

50 Shooter
June 10, 2012, 01:46 AM
The heaviest that Ive shot out of my Raging Bull is a 405 gr. hard cast bullet with gas check. I think I used 23 grs. of H110, would have to check my paperwork to be sure.

This round is punishing, I shoot 5 and then put it away for awhile. It was more of a can I do it and how bad will it be type of thing. Shooting lighter loads for accuracy or for speed is also another thing to do. That's the best part of rolling your own and knowing what your gun is capable of.

56hawk
June 10, 2012, 01:47 AM
Was doing some searching for 525 grain 454 bullets and this website is the only thing I can find that mentions them: http://www.levergun.com/articles/454_factoryammo.htm The third set of bullets in the picture below are 525 grains. Doesn't look like there is a lot of room left for powder.

http://www.levergun.com/articles/images/4pair.jpg

The-Reaver
June 10, 2012, 02:56 AM
56; This is the same place I got my info.
I was thinking about just sticking to like 300Gr stuff.

Not that I'll ever need it the biggest deer or bear we got in Florida is a couple hundred pounds. This was more of a curiosity type thing.

Thanks gents.

Hammerdown77
June 10, 2012, 03:15 AM
The other problem with long, heavy bullets is that the twist rate of the rifling might not be able to stabilize them.

260 to 335 or so grains is where the best results will lie in 454 Casull. Wanna load heavier bullets? Step up to the 475 Linebaugh and 500s (Linebaugh, Wyoming Express, JRH).

41 Mag
June 10, 2012, 10:17 AM
I can honestly say that after several years of playing with plenty of different loads and bullet weights that the above post about keeping within 260'ish and 325'ish is about the best advice I also could offer.

Within this range, you will get all the velocity you will need to drive most any of these weights fast enough to drop just about, if not, anything in NA and most of anywhere else.

The best thing I have found for mine, was pouring my own boolits. I can taylor the alloy to get expansion even on the heavier weights, and also taylor the velocity so as not to over drive the lighter ones which may or may not have a HP design. Not that the 300gr WFN loads I run between 1550 and 1700fps are lacking in any way, form, or fashion, but there is something to be said for a softer 250'ish gr HP running along at a modest 1150-1250fps when it hits soft tissue.

The nice thing about the 454 is that you DO have the choice to open it up to as much as you want or slow it down to just about 45 Colt loads. I haven't done much with the lighter HP's just yet, I have been working on a few other things, but here is a quick vid of the 300gr Lee RF hitting a 6 gal bucket at 50yds, skipping along at 1550fps.

Just click on the pic,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Shooting/Cast%20Boolit%20Loading%20and%20Shooting/th_300gr454.jpg (http://s49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Shooting/Cast%20Boolit%20Loading%20and%20Shooting/?action=view&current=300gr454.mp4)

This is the recovered boolit in the middle was found on the ground beside the set up. It penetrated two of the buckets full of water completely, and smacked an indention in the side of the third hard enough to permanently leave an nose sized indention. These are poured from straight WW alloy which from testing mine averages around a 12-13 BHN.
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Shooting/Cast%20Boolit%20Loading%20and%20Shooting/P7290251.jpg

If measured this would be over 24" of water, plus the half inch or so of plastic involved with the bucket sides. Not too shabby for a hunting load. I can also testify that at 87yds it will hit a hog just as hard.

shinyroks
June 10, 2012, 11:47 AM
heaviest I've loaded is a 405 resized to 452. Lyman has a load for it (if you use the 395 cast data). I don't think I would shoot this out of a handgun, but it matches the original 45/70 load at 1400 fps out of my 20" Puma. No yaw at 100yds, and I have hit what I imagine to be <18" rock 8/10 shots on irons at about 400 yds with the load. I dont think I would go any larger, just due to the fact there is hardly any room left for powder.

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