spray lube and semi-autos


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tightgroup tiger
June 17, 2012, 09:47 PM
Do any of you leave spray lube on 9mm shells after loading them so they go in the magazine easier, and run through the semi-auto easier?

I know we don't dare do that with larger caliber handguns and rifles, and I know why, but with a 9mm do you see anything wrong with this practice?

And if so why?

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cfullgraf
June 17, 2012, 09:51 PM
No.

Same reasons as for rifle cartridges and large caliber handguns.

greyling22
June 17, 2012, 10:02 PM
Since you ask what we DO, not what we OUGHT to do:

sometimes I will lightly spray my 9mm cases to assist in resizing them. I never clean them off afterwords. never had an issue in thousands and thousands of rounds. (I have a leading issue, but that is another issue I think I've finally resolved). Of course, I also only size down 2/3 or so of the case too so my advice may not carry much weight with everybody. And I don't clean off my rifle cases either, which can be a no-no. (but I've been using lee's lube and i'm stingy with it. The cases take a lot of effort and come out pretty clean, and get wiped off by fingers as I trim them. I just bought some of hornady's unique and it looks far messier. I may start cleaning after that.)

tightgroup tiger
June 17, 2012, 10:02 PM
I understand

tightgroup tiger
June 17, 2012, 10:10 PM
I'm sort of new to loading 9mm. Only been doing it for about 4years. I've always left the spray lube on instead of tumbling after loading. Maybe lazyness, but I've never had a failure of any kind either, but that doesn't mean I'm doing it right.

I don't load to maximum with 9's, usually middle of the road, but I was just wondering if I was flirting with problems.

rcmodel
June 18, 2012, 12:33 PM
Clean the lube off all reloaded ammo.

Your gun will thank you.

The lubed ammo will pick up grit and grime and increase wear.
Also rub off and build up in the mag and eventually do the same thing there.

Clean it off.

rc

Blue68f100
June 18, 2012, 03:22 PM
There's a reason for using carbide dies so we don't have to mess with the lube.

4895
June 18, 2012, 03:26 PM
I tumble all of my loaded ammo for about 5 minutes to take off the lubricant. It all comes out looking as close to new as I can make it.

ArchAngelCD
June 19, 2012, 04:05 AM
I sometimes use a small amount of One Shot on my 9mm and .45 Auto brass and even though I know i should clean them off I don't. I usually store my clean brass in 50 round trays that come with new ammo boxes and when I turn them out on the bench the 10 pieces on the sire get a light spray so it's every 5th that has a little lube. It's so slight I really don't bother cleaning it off... (I know, I know, I really should)

GT1
June 19, 2012, 07:02 AM
Sizing lube, maybe not so great, maybe no problem at all for those who are fastidious about caring for their firearms.

There are some comp shooters that spray down their boxes of ammo with silicone dry lube, however.

jmorris
June 19, 2012, 12:10 PM
I generally post load tumble but have had to load the morning of a match before and just dump them on a towel, rub them around a bit, casegauge and go. Never hurt anything.

There's a reason for using carbide dies so we don't have to mess with the lube. my carbide rifle dies still require lube. Most of the people I know that don't lube pistol cases with carbide dies have never tried it. It makes the process notably smoother with greatly reduced effort.

GLOOB
June 20, 2012, 02:49 AM
I wonder if it might make a small difference if the gun is straight blowback. The action might open sooner.

IIRC, one of the communist countries made a 9x19 version of their 9x18 blowback gun. They put ridges in the chamber to help retard the slide. Leaving lube on the cases is going the opposite direction, albeit just a hair.

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