Pregunta sobre Blue Dot


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Cacho Cuchi
June 20, 2012, 02:58 PM
Estimados foristas:
Necesitaría saber opinión sobre la siguiente carga en .38 Spl. para un Smith & Wesson cañón 4 pulgadas, en perfecto estado pero fabricado aproximadamenteen el año 1925.
Ful. Federal - 10 Grains Alliant 2400 - bullet Lead SWC 160 grains
Ful. Federal - 7,5 grains Blue Dot - bullet Lead SWC 160 grains
Ful. Federal - 6,5 grains Unique - bullet Hornady XTP 125 grains

Estas cargas están más altas que las recomendadas por los actuales manuales de recarga.
La pregunta: Es realmente peligroso para usarlas en unos pocos tiros de prueba y tenerlas luego como munición de defensa personal?
Agradeceré respuesta de gente que tenga experiencia en uso de las mismas.
Quedo a la espera

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rcmodel
June 20, 2012, 03:00 PM
No Comprende Senor!

rc

bds
June 20, 2012, 03:46 PM
Could anyone translate?

Perhaps Google translate?

saaman
June 20, 2012, 03:52 PM
Question about Blue Dot
Dear forum members:
Need to know views on the next load in .38 Spl. for a Smith & Wesson 4 inch barrel in excellent condition but made ​​about the year 1925.
Ful. Federal - 10 Grains Alliant 2400 - Lead bullet 160 grains SWC
Ful. Federal - 7.5 grains Blue Dot - Lead bullet 160 grains SWC
Ful. Federal - 6.5 grains Unique - Hornady XTP 125 grain bullet

These loads are higher than those recommended by the current manual reloading.
The question: Is it really dangerous to use in a few test shots and then have them as ammunition for self defense?
Grateful response from people with experience in using them.
I look forward

saaman
June 20, 2012, 03:56 PM
I would not use heavy loads in an older Smith & Wesson.

Yo no usaría cargas pesadas en un viejo Smith & Wesson.

T Bran
June 20, 2012, 03:58 PM
The gentleman wishes to know if it is safe to use these loads in a 1925 S&W 38 special as they are over the max in the manual available to him if my spanglish isnt failing me.
He wants to know if anyone else is experienced with these loadings and would obviously like recomendations with these components.
Hope I got the gist of the question. These seem to be intended for personal defence.
T

jim8115
June 20, 2012, 04:08 PM
What is the spanish word for Kaboom?

beatledog7
June 20, 2012, 04:19 PM
El Kaboomo?

1911Tuner
June 20, 2012, 05:02 PM
If someone can type it up in Espanol...tell him to have the gun checked for headspace and excessive endshake before firing it with anything hotter than target wadcutters.

jim8115
June 20, 2012, 05:14 PM
Somebody better stop this guy.........6.5 Grains Unique? in a 90 yr old gun?
Thats over max for a modern +p

Josh45
June 20, 2012, 05:36 PM
La pistola que to tiene is muy viejo por los cargos que tu quire tu usar.
Le mejor cosa te hacer is to compra una neuvo libra por reloading.

Compra una que llamme " Lyman 49th"
Por favor, No hace nada por momentos. Quando tiene la libro, Despues hacer con reloading por tu pistola.

Los cargas que tu quiere tu usar es muy peligroso por tu y tu pistola.

Stumper
June 20, 2012, 07:17 PM
Se puede encontrar estas cargas en algunals libros de anos atras. Sin duda muchas revolveres de la misma edad de la tuya han dado fuego de estas cartuchos....pero.... El revolver es viejo y estas cargass provablement causan presion mas que la normal. Un poco menos es advisible.

Lost Sheep
June 20, 2012, 09:33 PM
Spanish

Bienvenido al foro y gracias por preguntar nuestro consejo.

Ingles

Welcome to the forum and thank you for asking our advice.

Spanish

En el pasado, los libros de carga dio recetas que eran más poderosos que los mismos editores dan hoy en día. Especialmente con las rondas magnum, pero para las rondas de estándar también.

Ingles.

In the past, loading books gave recipes which were more powerful than those same publishers give today. Especially with magnum rounds, but for standard rounds also.


Spanish

El equipo de prueba en los laboratorios de balística se han vuelto más sofisticados y (algunos dicen) los editores y los fabricantes se han vuelto más temerosos de la responsabilidad (demandas).

Imgles

The test equipment in ballistics laboratories have become more sophisticated and (some say) publishers and manufacturers have become more fearful of liability (lawsuits).

Spanish

Anuncio # 9 de 1911Tuner (un moderaror del foro) sugiere lo siguiente:

Compruebe la pistola de espacio de cabeza (la separación entre presentación de nalgas [o trasera de la cámara de arma de fuego] y el trasera del cartucho) y "endshake" excesivo (la cantidad de movimiento libre del cilindro a la parte delantera y en la parte trasera) antes de disparar con nada más caliente que la munición de destino.

Ingles

Post #9 from 1911Tuner (a moderaror of the forum) suggests:

Check the gun for headspace (the clearance between breech and cartridge) and excessive endshake (how tightly the cylinder is held in the frame or the amount of free movement of the cylinder fore and aft) before firing it with anything hotter than target ammunition.

Spanish

¿Sabe usted la historia de esta arma en particular? Conocer su historia puede ser útil en la evaluación de su fuerza.

Ingles

Do you know this history of this particular gun? Knowing it's history might be useful in evaluating its strength.

Lost Sheep (oveja perdido)

"Lost", en Inglés tiene múltiples significados, que utilizo como un juego de palabras (extraviado, perecido, desorientado, quedado y olvidado) así como la parábola de la oveja perdida en Mateo (18:12-14). He estado todos los que en mi vida.

"Lost", in English, has multiple meanings, which I use as a pun including as well as the parable of the Lost Sheep in Matthew (18:12–14). I have been all of those in my life.

Thanks to Texan Scott (post 17) and to Wankerjake (post 18) for their linquistic critiques.

Gracias a Texano Scott (puesto 17) y Wankerjake (puesto 18) para sus comentarios linquistic.

Pit4Brains
June 20, 2012, 11:50 PM
Handloading as a Second Language.

How does he know how to reload but doesn't know the dangers of loading for antique firearms?

Lost Sheep
June 21, 2012, 12:52 AM
Handloading as a Second Language.

How does he know how to reload but doesn't know the dangers of loading for antique firearms?
I don't know about that. He has a Smith & Wesson 38 Special in perfect condition but questions if loading to the power levels he has found in his loading manuals is dangerous simply because of the age of the gun. It seems a reasonable question to ask.

He does apparently know the dangers of loading for antique guns. That's why he asked.

As far as I know, steel does not weaken just by sitting around for 87 years. If the gun has not been abused, it should be as strong as it was when new. A lot of reloaders have wondered why loading manuals have lower charge weights in 2012 than were published in 1980. I have no idea what charge weights were published in 1925. 1912 - 1930 was a time of great changes in the development of propellants. It's an intelligent question.

Or maybe it's a troll.

Benefit of the doubt

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep

Pit4Brains
June 21, 2012, 01:18 AM
Many things can be a factor. Metallurgy used in the firearm at the time, diameter and composition of the available ammunition at the time. I'm no expert here but sometime's great grandpa's old gun just needs to stay on the mantle.

If the firearm has indeed been cared for it's whole life and not suspected to rust and mom's occasional cleaning off with whatever cleaner that could cause hydrogen embrittlement, then by all means, build up some conservative loads and enjoy.

Texan Scott
June 21, 2012, 03:24 AM
I just thought it might also be worth pointing out a bit of idiom... depending on where he's from/ what dialect he speaks, 'nalgas' might mean butt-cheeks, not 'breach'.... and 'oveja perdido' might well mean 'damned sheep'. Cultural exchange is fun!

wankerjake
June 21, 2012, 01:25 PM
'nalgas' might mean butt-cheeks, not 'breach'

Hahahaha, that is indeed my understanding of the word "nalgas." I miss Tucson sometimes.

ArchAngelCD
June 22, 2012, 02:03 AM
Doy la bienvenida al foro ...

Estoy de acuerdo que usted no debería usar las cargas calientes en ese revólver. Se puede hacer daño y que sería una lástima.

I agree that you should not use hot loads in that revolver. It can hurt and it would be a shame.

16in50calNavalRifle
June 22, 2012, 03:25 AM
Just want to salute everyone in the thread - the linguists, the wags, the mod, those wishing to help, everyone - for again illustrating why THR is one of the most interesting, useful, admirable, and intermittently hilarious forums on the web. Special kudos to Lost Sheep for his excellent response.

My Portuguese allowed me to understand his question but I'm glad I got here after the Spanish-speaking members had taken care of business.

Now where are the Russian-speaking handloaders with questions so I can scurry to my dictionary? (hmmm - the only Russian vocabulary I recall related to weaponry deals with bombers, submarines, ballistic missiles, multiple-re-entry vehicles, and Functionally Related Observable Differences - wonder what "cartridge overall length" is po-russki?)

bds
June 22, 2012, 04:23 AM
16in50calNavalRifle, Google Translate is not perfect but does a decent enough job to get the message across - http://translate.google.com/

Here's Google translation to Portugese. How is it?
Google Translate não é perfeito, mas faz um trabalho decente o suficiente para fazer passar a mensagem


Russian:
Google Translate не является совершенным, но делает приличную работу, чтобы получить сообщение через


Japanese?
Google Translate は完璧ではないが、全体でメッセージを取得するためのまともな十分な仕事をしていません

Texan Scott
June 22, 2012, 10:04 AM
The main problem with auto-translation is, as with guns, not the machine but the person using it (as all High Roaders know). Particularly when a word has more than one meaning in either language, it's often difficult to know whether a word is a synonym, or a different term entirely (such as 'nalgas' for 'breech'. It DOES mean 'breech', but only in the same older, idiomatic English sense as 'fundament').
Unfortunately, technical language ESPECIALLY becomes rather idiomatic. WE know what we mean by 'headspace', but it doesn't translate into other languages as a recognized term. Sometimes it's frustratingly necessary to define/ explain rather than label or name.
Spanish is particularly difficult because it's not nearly as standardized worldwide as English. Most Brits seem to understand most Americans at least 95%, because we share a lot of T.V./ movies/ books/ magazines; Spaniards and Guatamalans, for instance, DON'T. My Spanish is primarily European, with a bit a Castillian... I actually understand Sicillian Italian quite well, but struggle with people from Nuevo Laredo a couple hours away.
Lost Sheep, I do apologize if it seemed like I was poking fun. You made a very worthy effort, and I'm sure the OP appreciated it. For what it's worth, I once knew a family that did missionary work in Venezuala... their first time down, the wife confused 'embarassed' with 'embarrazado', tossed in an odd verb tense, and instead of telling the elders of a local chuch that she was embarassed by their kind welcome, she roundly informed them that their hospitality had impregnated her. :what:
I think it's great that people around the world look to us as sources of reliable information, and even better that you were willing to step forward and give it your best shot.

Lost Sheep
June 22, 2012, 09:48 PM
Lost Sheep, I do apologize if it seemed like I was poking fun. You made a very worthy effort, and I'm sure the OP appreciated it. For what it's worth, I once knew a family that did missionary work in Venezuala... their first time down, the wife confused 'embarassed' with 'embarrazado', tossed in an odd verb tense, and instead of telling the elders of a local chuch that she was embarassed by their kind welcome, she roundly informed them that their hospitality had impregnated her.

I enjoy poking fun and being fun-poked as well (which might have its own double-entendre). I enjoyed your comments in the spirit in which they were written.

I don't want to side-track the thread, but I recall a conversation between two couples who shared an apartment building. All good friends, both the husbands were Ameircan Airmen, but one of the wives was a Brit. The British wife, knowing the schedule of the other couple, innocently asked the other's husband (when both couples were at dinner), "On your way to work tomorrow, would you stop 'round our flat and knock me up?" (As opposed to "ring me up"?) For several minutes the three Americans could not stop laughing long enough to explain to the Brit what she had just said.

I know a bit of high-school Spanish, and I tried to back-translate the Google translator to ensure against translating (especially terms of art) nonsensically. Not with 100% success, but apparently close enough. I also provided original English text so Cacho Cuchi could cross-check if necessary.

Lost Sheep

mackg
June 24, 2012, 09:34 PM
Bienvenido al foro

Como se dice Cacho Cuchi en Engles? :D

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