Chrome lined??


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RonDeer10mm
June 20, 2012, 10:37 PM
Can a steel rod ruin my rifles rifling if a steel rod was inserted down the bore and my rifle is chrome-lined? I don't use steel rods (EXCEPTED THE NYLON COATED KIND) but I didn't have much of a choice. :(

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Walkalong
June 20, 2012, 10:42 PM
As long as it is clean, you will be fine. No different than a coated rod in that regard. Grit on the rod can definitely harm the barrel.

meanmrmustard
June 20, 2012, 10:45 PM
You may experience very small, nearly microscopic peens or scrapes to your lands that could degrade accuracy. Chrome, however, is a hard material and protects well. Hopefully, your adventure was short lived and the rod was undersized of your bore diameter? I'd say, if you were careful not to jag the rod at a funky angle, and only went through once, shoot the gun and be happy.

RonDeer10mm
June 20, 2012, 11:08 PM
the one used wasn't coated.

animator
June 21, 2012, 01:08 AM
Steel rods to more damage to the muzzle than they do the overall bore of the gun.


Damaging the muzzle is going to have the most detrimental effect on accuracy, which is why it's recommended to clean from the breech end, regardless of the type of cleaning rod. In instances where this isn't possible, it's recommended to use a bore guide.


So unless you dinged the crap out of your muzzle, your barrel will be unaffected.

madcratebuilder
June 21, 2012, 09:30 AM
Steel rods to more damage to the muzzle than they do the overall bore of the gun.


Damaging the muzzle is going to have the most detrimental effect on accuracy, which is why it's recommended to clean from the breech end, regardless of the type of cleaning rod. In instances where this isn't possible, it's recommended to use a bore guide.


So unless you dinged the crap out of your muzzle, your barrel will be unaffected.
This.

One reason you see a lot of mil-surps that are counter bored. Muzzle damage from years of cleaning by conscripts wears the muzzle and degrades accuracy.

Cleaning rods are made from a mild steel that is softer than barrel steel. Just use common sense and a steel rod well be OK.

sansone
June 21, 2012, 09:49 AM
+1 again..
watch that muzzle, your rifling is fine buddy. Avoid inserting anything from the muzzle end. I don't even pull the brush back through the muzzle when cleaning.
I unscrew the brush.

rcmodel
June 21, 2012, 02:30 PM
Can a steel rod ruin my rifles rifling if a steel rod was inserted down the bore and my rifle is chrome-lined?No.
Military GI issue cleaning rods for the M16 and M4 are steel, phosphate coated, and jointed to come apart in several sections.

If they harmed a chrome lined barrel, the entire U.S. military would be fighting wars with damaged barrels.

And they are not.

All I use in the shop are polished stainless steel cleaning rods.
They will not harm a barrel either.

rc

Skyshot
June 21, 2012, 02:58 PM
No.
Military GI issue cleaning rods for the M16 and M4 are steel, phosphate coated, and jointed to come apart in several sections.

If they harmed a chrome lined barrel, the entire U.S. military would be fighting wars with damaged barrels.

And they are not.

All I use in the shop are polished stainless steel cleaning rods.
They will not harm a barrel either.

rc
Agreed, steel rod won't hurt the barrel, it's pinging the crown with an oversized jag or other attachment that will cause you grief.

meanmrmustard
June 21, 2012, 10:06 PM
This is why I use bore snakes.

rcmodel
June 22, 2012, 12:47 PM
Bore snakes are not the end-all means to cleaning.

You need a rod & brush to properly clean bottleneck chambers.
You need a rod to properly use copper solvent or bore lapping compound.
You need a rod to try to get the bore snake out after the string breaks off in the barrel.

rc

meanmrmustard
June 22, 2012, 09:38 PM
Bore snakes are not the end-all means to cleaning.

You need a rod & brush to properly clean bottleneck chambers.
You need a rod to properly use copper solvent or bore lapping compound.
You need a rod to try to get the bore snake out after the string breaks off in the barrel.

rc
I use bore cleaner compound on the snake.
It's machine washable.
I've had the same ones for years, no broken strings ( lucky I guess).
I do not use nor like rods of any design, and have not noticed any discernabe loss in accuracy or reliability in using one. My gunsmith friend says this is not a silly thing, as microscopic peens on the rifling is as if not more detrimental than shooting dirty as far as accuracy is concerned. I trust his judgment.
Do not using lapping compound. I'm of the JSI school of gun ownership.

Stack
June 23, 2012, 12:00 AM
Don't forget a bore guide to protect the chamber.

Sheepdog1968
June 23, 2012, 12:54 AM
I tend to be a 3 MOA shooter give or take a MOA out to 300 yards. Yes on occasion a shoot a 1 MOA group. Given the size of my groups I suspect these issues are unlikely to impact my group size.

bhk
June 23, 2012, 08:31 AM
Steel rods cause no damage when cleaning from the breech and when a bore guide is used. Steel, uncoated rods were the prefered cleaning tool for benchrest shooters for many, many years and nobody cares more for their bores than the benchrest folks. Plain steel was often prefered over coated rods because the coated rods were more likely to retain abrasive grit on their surface.

My rods are all one-piece steel. I also use a Bore Snake for quick cleaning, but it doesn't come close to cleaning as well as a rod, jag, brush, and patches. Doubt it? Clean your rifle first with a Bore Snake. Then break out the cleaning rod and proper fitting brush and patches. You will amazed at the filth that comes out of the supposedly 'clean' Bore-Snaked barrel.

meanmrmustard
June 23, 2012, 08:39 AM
Steel rods cause no damage when cleaning from the breech and when a bore guide is used. Steel, uncoated rods were the prefered cleaning tool for benchrest shooters for many, many years and nobody cares more for their bores than the benchrest folks. Plain steel was often prefered over coated rods because the coated rods were more likely to retain abrasive grit on their surface.

My rods are all one-piece steel. I also use a Bore Snake for quick cleaning, but it doesn't come close to cleaning as well as a rod, jag, brush, and patches. Doubt it? Clean your rifle first with a Bore Snake. Then break out the cleaning rod and proper fitting brush and patches. You will amazed at the filth that comes out of the supposedly 'clean' Bore-Snaked barrel.
I have done so. When first deciding to make the transition to bore snakes, I did put a clean patch through after six passes with the snake to see what remained. Either I suck at using a rod and jag, or the the bore snake worked better. Been using them almost exclusively ever since. Those who do not use solvents and repeat the process more than one pass through are getting junk left in their barrels.

It's what works for me, anyways. To each their own.

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